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Tagged with “products” (5)

  1. Mark Adams from Vitsœ talks to Dieter Rams

    As head of design at Braun, the German consumer electronics manufacturer, Dieter Rams emerged as one of the most influential industrial designers of the late 20th century by defining an elegant, legible, yet rigorous visual language for its products. The exhibition showcases Rams’ landmark designs for Braun and furniture manufacturer Vitsœ, examines how Rams’ design ethos inspired Braun’s entire product range for over 40 years and assess his lasting influence on today’s design landscape.

    From: http://designmuseum.org/podcasts

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  2. Bill Buxton and Jared Spool (Spark | CBC Radio)

    Earlier this week, I wrote about digital Swiss Army knives. Today, Nora talked to researchers Bill Buxton and Jared Spool about the relative merits of single-purpose and multi-function devices. A shorter version of this discussion will air on Spark 98, but you can hear the full, uncut interview below, or download the MP3. [runs 38:34]

    http://www.cbc.ca/spark/2010/01/full-interview-bill-buxton-and-jared-spool/

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  3. Tim Brown: Change By Design

    Tim Brown

    CEO, IDEO; Author, Change By Design

    One myth of innovation is that brilliant solutions leap fully formed from the minds of geniuses. In reality, we don’t simply realize solutions; we design them. Design thinking is now being applied to address a wide range of concerns, from delivering clean drinking water to improving airport security and microfinancing.

    This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on November 9, 2009

    http://fora.tv/2009/11/09/Change_by_Design_Tim_Brown_of_IDEO

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  4. From Pixels to Plastic

    As a point of departure, Matt Webb introduces us to the concept of Generation C, a generation not defined by age but by a mindset shaped by the internet. People in Generation C are connected in communities, are creatively involved, and like to control their surroundings.

    Designing products that appeal to Generation C involves looking at the experience that products produce and treating experience as a design surface on which to work. Using entertaining examples, Matt illustrates the colors in the experience pallet. He discusses the enjoyment we get out of watching familiar things happen, why we like to work with semi-autonomous things, and the pleasure we get from conceiving complex activities as a single object.

    This design philosophy tends to blur the boundaries between hardware, software, and the Web. Concepts like desktop widgets can be abstracted to new products that transcend the computer desktop. Pixels can become plastic.

    From: http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail3491.html?loomia_si=t0:a16:g2:r2:c0.183942:b16407789

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