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Tagged with “process” (12)

  1. 003: Craig Mod – I Want My Attention Back! - Hurry Slowly

    Designer Craig Mod on how you can break free from the shackles of “attention slavery” and regain control over your powers of concentration.

    http://hurryslowly.co/003-craig-mod/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Sugar and salt: Industrial is best

    Henry Hobhouse’s book Seeds of Change: Five Plants That Transformed Mankind (now six, with the addition of cacao) contains the remarkable fact that at the height of the slave trade a single teaspoon of sugar cost six minutes of a man’s life to produce. Reason enough to cheer the abolition of slavery, I suppose. But that doesn’t mean that everything is sweetness and light in the business of sugar. Or salt. A photo gallery in The Big Picture made that very clear, and inspired Rachel Laudan, a food historian, to write in praise of industrial salt and sugar.

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/sugar-and-salt-industrial-is-best/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. The Haber-Bosch Process

    Saving lives with thin air - by taking nitrogen from the air to make fertiliser, the Haber-Bosch Process has been called the greatest invention of the 20th Century – and without it almost half the world’s population would not be alive today. A 100 years ago two German chemists, Fritz Haber and Carl Bosch, figured out a way to use nitrogen from the air to make ammonia, which makes fertiliser. It was like alchemy; ‘Brot aus Luft’, as Germans put it, ‘Bread from air’.

    Haber and Bosch both received a Nobel prize for their invention. But Haber’s place in history is controversial – he is also considered the ‘father of chemical warfare’ for his years of work developing and weaponising chlorine and other poisonous gases during World War One.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04f77rg

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Modular Design — Responsive Web Design

    Imagine you’re embarking on a CMS replatforming and website redesign. Ethan and Karen explain how a modular design process that puts content modeling and design patterns first will help you.

    http://responsivewebdesign.com/podcast/modular-design/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Remembering the Everyday Developer with Rachel Andrew | The Web Ahead

    An inordinate amount of attention is being paid these days to complex tools chains, JavaScript frameworks, and the assumption that the web is an application platform. Has the web actually been taken over by this one flavor of site? Aren’t we getting off-track when we act like nothing else exists anymore? What about the everyday developer? Rachel Andrew joins Jen Simmons to discuss.

    http://thewebahead.net/104

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. RWD Podcast Episode #17 : Stephen Hay — Responsive Web Design

    This week I welcome Stephen Hay to the show. I had a great time chatting with Stephen about his work on responsive design workflow, how he approaches the design process and he even parts with the Ultimate Advanced Responsive Design technique.

    http://responsivedesign.is/articles/rwd-podcast-episode-17-stephen-hay

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. The Web Ahead #80: The Complexity and the Humanity with Trent Walton

    Trent Walton joins Jen Simmons to tell tales of working on the microsoft.com homepage and other big projects — sharing what can go right and what can go wrong.

    http://5by5.tv/webahead/80

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Stephen Hay – Responsive Web Design Workflow » UIE Brain Sparks

    The web is no longer fixed width. Designs are more malleable than ever because of fluid grids, media queries, and everything else that comes with responsive web design. This makes using static photoshop comps as a deliverable unmanageable. Design workflows inevitably have to change and adapt as the way we design for the web evolves.

    In his virtual seminar, Responsive Web Design Workflow, Stephen Hay outlines how his workflow has changed in the face of new design processes. He believes that taking a content first approach is instrumental to working with fluid designs. This allows you to mold the design around the content instead of trying to fit the content into a fixed design.

    The audience had a bunch of great questions during the live seminar. Stephen joins Adam Churchill for this podcast to answer some of those questions.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2014/01/30/stephen-hay-responsive-web-design-workflow/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Ben Callahan – Structuring Your Workflow for Responsive Web Design » UIE Brain Sparks

    As responsive web design becomes more prevalent, our approach to designing for the web is changing. With former assumptions, as dismissive as they may have been, that the web was a fixed width, it was easier to have a more linear workflow. With the need for the web to reconfigure and adapt to different devices and displays, designers and developers need to adapt to changing workflows.

    Ben Callahan of Sparkbox has experienced this changing landscape firsthand. He has found that even down to the core of how they price projects has changed with responsive work. The fact that their development and design process have continued to get more iterative and collaborative has had a ripple effect on all aspects of projects. This has allowed clients to become more involved in the process.

    Ben says that getting the client involved from the beginning helps shape the scope and phases of the project. They try to learn as much as they can to inform what it is they’ll do next. He says that his team has really tried to embrace the idea and approach clients with “The understanding that we know less about your project today, then we will tomorrow”.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2013/12/17/ben-callahan-structuring-your-workflow-for-responsive-web-design/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Beyond The Planet of the Geeks

    Brendan Dawes is a big-a-geek as anyone; he loves nothing more than making and experimenting with all the wondrous technologies, tools, toys and other magical things that constantly surround us. But the thing is, geeks never changed anything, well not in a real-world sense. Making cutting edge Javascript demos with the likes of Canvas or SVG are all well and good but for things to really change and have an impact stuff needs to move beyond the confines of the world of the geek and become common place, the norm and paradoxically, invisible!

    In this session Brendan takes you through his process of experimentation with purpose and how he and the team at magneticNorth are now actively using these exciting new technolgies on real client work that goes beyond bouncing ball demoes to create new interfaces and new ways to explore.

    http://2011.full-frontal.org/schedule

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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