adactio / tags / privacy

Tagged with “privacy” (34)

  1. Episode 7: The Computermen — The Last Archive

    In 1966, just as the foundations of the Internet were getting dreamed up…

    the federal government considered building a National Data Center. It would be a centralized federal facility to hold computer records from each federal agency, in the same way that the Library of Congress holds books and the National Archives holds manuscripts. Proponents argued that it would help regulate and compile the vast quantities of data the government was collecting. Quickly, though, fears about privacy, government conspiracies, and government ineptitude buried the idea. But now, that National Data Center looks like a missed opportunity to create rules about data and privacy before the Internet took off. And in the absence of government action, corporations have made those rules themselves.

    https://www.thelastarchive.com/season-1/episode-7-the-computermen

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. The Superhuman Brouhaha With Mike Davidson - Techmeme Ride Home

    Remember the whole Superhuman kerfuffle of the last week or so? Mike Davidson wrote a blog post calling out some shady stuff in the Superhuman email product, all of silicon valley debated it, Superhuman walked things back a bit, and actually, I didn’t mention this, but Mike had a second post about this, which was even more in depth an eloquent than the first one. So, I reached out to Mike to talk about this whole thing, not because I wanted to re-litigate it, but because I wanted to poke at… well, what I said last week… what does this whole debate say about the discourse in tech at the moment?

    https://pca.st/6h6w

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. My Recode Decode Interview with Kara Swisher | Matt Mullenweg

    “We want to make the best tools in the world, and we want to do it for decades to come. I’ve been doing WordPress for 15 years, I want to do it the rest of my life.”

    The last time I chatted with Kara was in 2013 in the back of a pedicab in Austin. This time I got to sit in the red chair at Vox headquarters in San Francisco, and per usual Kara was thoughtful, thorough and to the point: we talked about WordPress and the future of the open web, the moral imperative of user privacy, and how it all relates to what’s going on at Facebook.

    (As it turns out, Facebook also is turning off the ability for WordPress sites — and all websites — to post directly to users’ profile pages. The decision to shut down the API is ostensibly to fight propaganda and misinformation on the platform, but I think it’s a big step back for their embrace of the open web. I hope they change their minds.)

    Kara and I also talked about distributed work, Automattic’s acquisition of Atavist and Longreads, and why every tech company should have an editorial team. Thanks again to Kara and the Recode team for having me.

    https://ma.tt/2018/07/my-recode-decode-interview-with-kara-swisher/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Zeynep Tufekci: Machine intelligence makes human morals more important | TED Talk | TED.com

    Machine intelligence is here, and we’re already using it to make subjective decisions. But the complex way AI grows and improves makes it hard to understand and even harder to control. In this cautionary talk, techno-sociologist Zeynep Tufekci explains how intelligent machines can fail in ways that don’t fit human error patterns — and in ways we won’t expect or be prepared for. "We cannot outsource our responsibilities to machines," she says. "We must hold on ever tighter to human values and human ethics."

    https://www.ted.com/talks/zeynep_tufekci_machine_intelligence_makes_human_morals_more_important

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Maciej Ceglowski – The Internet With a Human Face – beyond tellerrand Düsseldorf 2014

    The Internet as we’ve built it is getting boring and creepy. Everything is tracked forever, not just by sneaky governments, but by advertisers who see any human relationship as a sales opportunity. We’re told to confess our interests, our activities, and our physical location to a small group of centralized companies, or risk being forever left behind. But being left behind is starting to sound more appealing.

    What would it mean to have a more human Internet? How can we keep the convenience and fun without sacrificing so much of our dignity? How can we fix the online world so we’ll be proud to pass to our children? And where do we begin?

    ===
    Original video: https://vimeo.com/102717446
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Spark 246, CBC Radio

    Are you ready to run your own cloud? Be your own Windows XP tech support? Watch total strangers play video games? Debate whether it’s possible to design things for forever on the internet?

    http://www.cbc.ca/spark/episodes/2014/03/30/spark-246/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Unfinished Business 53: A bedroom and no social life

    It’s a good one this week. I’m joined again by Elliott Kember to talk about whether being acquired is just a poncy way of saying that you’re taking a job at a big company. We discuss Google buying a nest thermostatNest Labs for $3.2billion when they could’ve got one for a hundred quid at B&Q and why some people have reacted very negatively to the deal.

    Best of all, we start and end this episode with a song that sounds absolutely nothing at all like Purple Rain. You don’t get singing like that on The Freelance Web or The Big Web Show, I can tell you.

    http://unfinished.bz/53

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Gabriella Coleman on the ethics of free software

    Gabriella Coleman, the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy in the Art History and Communication Studies Department at McGill University, discusses her new book, “Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking,” which has been released under a Creative Commons license.

    Coleman, whose background is in anthropology, shares the results of her cultural survey of free and open source software (F/OSS) developers, the majority of whom, she found, shared similar backgrounds and world views. Among these similarities were an early introduction to technology and a passion for civil liberties, specifically free speech.

    Coleman explains the ethics behind hackers’ devotion to F/OSS, the social codes that guide its production, and the political struggles through which hackers question the scope and direction of copyright and patent law. She also discusses the tension between the overtly political free software movement and the “politically agnostic” open source movement, as well as what the future of the hacker movement may look like.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2013/01/08/gabriella-coleman-2/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

Page 1 of 4Older