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Tagged with “preservation” (73)

  1. Abby Smith Rumsey at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    Abby Smith Rumsey at The Interval: Memory is not about the past, it is about the future. Historian and media expert Abby Smith Rumsey explores how digital memory, which cannot be preserved, will shape the future of knowledge and affect our survival. From March 02016.

    Abby Smith Rumsey is a historian who writes about how ideas and information technologies shape perceptions of history, of time, and of personal and cultural identity. She served as director of the Scholarly Communication Institute at the University of Virginia, and worked for more than a decade at the Library of Congress. Her book When We Are No More, How Digital Memory Is Shaping Our Future (02016) looks at how human memory from pre-history to the present has shed light on the grand challenge facing our world—the abundance of information and scarcity of human attention.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02016/mar/29/how-digital-memory-shaping-our-future

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  2. Abby Smith Rumsey on Remembering, Forgetting, and When We Are No More - Econlib

    You might think your tweets on Twitter belong to you. But in 2010, the Library of Congress acquired the entire archive of Twitter. Why would such a majestic library acquire such seemingly ephemeral material? Historian Abby Smith Rumsey, author of When We Are No More, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about this decision of the Library of Congress and the general challenge of how to cope with a world when so much of what we write and read is digital. Subjects discussed include what we can learn from the past, the power of collective memory, what is worth saving, and how we might archive our electronic lives so that we and those who come after us can find what we might be looking for.

    http://www.econtalk.org/abby-smith-rumsey-on-remembering-forgetting-and-when-we-are-no-more/

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  3. Infinite Scroll

    Our distant ancestors often felt overloaded by information. (“Have you read Cicero’s latest speech?” “I don’t have time!”) Throughout history we’ve invented shortcuts like tables of contents, indexes, book reviews, and encyclopedias. What technological solutions might help us cope with the information overload we experience today? Guests include: Stewart Butterfield, CEO of Slack, and Nathan Jurgenson, Snapchat sociologist.

    https://slate.com/technology/2018/11/tools-to-manage-information-overload-tables-of-contents-indexes-encyclopedias-slack.html

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  4. The Free-Range Archivist: Jason Scott

    Today, The Keepers continues with the launch of "Keeper of the Day," our new daily, year-long social media series featuring keepers from around the world. {Kind of like baseball cards}. Keeper of the Day will arrive in an array of modes—radio, podcasts, photographs, graphics, videos, quotes…. 

    Along with more stories of activist archivists, rogue librarians, curators, collectors and historians, we’ll be featuring keepers of all kinds—river keepers, seed keepers, climate keepers, peacekeepers—stewards of culture, civil liberties, the land, the free flow of information and ideas—people who take it upon themselves to preserve and protect.

    Keeper of the Day (#keeperoftheday) will appear on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, kitchensisters.org, emails, and beyond. We’ll be telling in a medley of mediums. Daily for a year. A keeper a day.

    We begin this wing of the series at the Internet Archive in San Francisco. Twas there we met him. 

    Keeper #1: The Free-Range Archivist: Jason Scott, the public facing mouth of the Internet Archive. Listen and you’ll see why. This story was produced by one of our mighty interns, Juliet Gelfman-Randazzo, in collaboration with The Kitchen Sisters. This is Juliet’s first story. She took the reins and we were knocked out by what she did. Jim …

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/kitchensisters/the-free-range-archivist-jason-scott
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 16 Oct 2018 22:20:20 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  5. Setting the Record Straight by Going Wayback

    The public web is a fact checker’s dream, but not everything stays up forever. More than just an invaluable contribution to collective memory, the practice of web crawling, indexing and archiving empowers the research and journalism that is ultimately required to speak truth to power.

    Speaker: Mark Graham - Director, the Wayback Machine, The Internet Archive

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/onlinenewsassociation/setting-the-record-straight-by-going-wayback
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 08 Oct 2018 20:50:20 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  6. Languages on the Brink – Can technology save our endangered languages?

    We can now record the world’s languages at an unprecedented rate, precisely at the moment they are most threatened. What does the future hold for language in the age of digital tech? At Melbourne Knowledge Week 2018, linguist and international guest of the festival Laura Welcher (The Long Now Foundation), Nick Thieberger (Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures) and Paul Paton (First Languages Australia) get together to discuss the future of language preservation. Date recorded: 7/5/2018

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/knowledgemelbourne/languages-on-the-brink-can-technology-save-our-endangered-languages
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 09 Aug 2018 20:22:21 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  7. The Vault - 99% Invisible

    Svalbard is a remote Norwegian archipelago with reindeer, Arctic foxes and only around 2,500 humans — but it is also home to a vault containing seeds for virtually every edible plant one can imagine. The mountainside Crop Trust facility has thousands of varieties of corn, rice and more, serving as a seed backup for humanity. For each crop, there’s an envelope with 500 seeds.

    This featured episode explores an unusual reserve of invaluable resources. It is designed to be egalitarian, beyond everyday politics and international strife. Any nation can store seeds in the vault for free, making the vault a sort of world peace zone. South Korea’s seeds sit next to North Korea’s. Ukraine’s are right next to Russia’s. Protecting our food supply is one thing the whole world can get behind.

    The vault’s origins start with one man during World War II — a global existential crisis if ever there was one. His name was Nikolay Vavilov and he lived in what was then the Soviet Union. He grew up during some intense famines in eastern Europe, and he was determined to never let them happen again. As Vavilov began his work as a botanist during the 1920s, he developed an idea: maybe collecting the seeds, and understanding how crop diversity across the world works, could help to fight off crop failures and to prevent famines. Vavilov and a team began gathering hundreds of thousands of different kinds of seeds from 64 countries during more than 100 expeditions.

    Vavilov’s team continued his mission through the siege of Leningrad, which lasted almost two and a half years. More than a million people died — half of them from starvation alone. They persisted even when they were starving and the seeds they were protecting could have saved their lives. In total, twelve scientists perished protecting seeds. Vavilov himself starved to death in prison. But the seeds survived.

    The Svalbard vault is a direct descendant of this legacy, and the building in St. Petersburg where Vavilov first began his work is now the Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry.

    The First Withdrawal

    ICARDA (International Center for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas) facility in SyriaThe Svalbard Global Seed Vault may be the most famous such facility in the world, but it is not the only one. 99pi producer Emmett Fitzgerald looked into another seed bank in Syria, run by the organization ICARDA (International Center for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas). He spoke with the former director Mahmoud Solh. Like Nikolai Vavilov, when Dr. Solh was a young plant scientist he set off on his own seed collecting journey. He made his way through Central Asian countries including Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Turkey and Afghanistan.

    Dr. Solh drove all over Afghanistan in a Jeep looking for wild lentils and chickpeas. The seeds he gathered were the beginning of the ICARDA collection. ICARDA stores seeds and breeds plants that can help farmers in dry parts of the world. They have one of the world’s largest collections of drought tolerant seeds, including thousands of varieties of barley, lentil, and fava beans.

    English: Formerly located just outside of Aleppo, Syria, ICARDA left its headquarters due to the war and re-established sites in Lebanon and Morocco. (J.Owens/VOA)For years this collection was stored in a facility in Aleppo, Syria, but when the violence in that country broke out in 2011 the plant scientists started to get worried about their seeds, and so they sent seeds to other seed banks around the world before they were forced to leave Aleppo.

    Cary Fowler, the founder of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, ended up calling Dr. Solh and inviting him to store some ICARDA seeds up in the Norwegian Arctic. “We got them up to Svalbard,” he recalls, “and when it became clear that those researchers were not going to be able to go back to their institution and they had re-established themselves in Morocco and Lebanon … they asked for their seed collection back so they could re-establish their seed bank.”

    ICARDA seeds in storage at the Svalbard Global Seed VaultThis was the first time that anyone had taken seeds back out of Svalbard, and they used those seeds that had been stored in Svalbard to create two new seed banks, one in Morocco and one in Lebanon. Cary Fowler says this shows that the seed vault can function like a back-up hard drive. And he points out that when it comes to our food supply, the risk of not having good backup is really high. “In the past this would this kind of event would likely have led to extinction. And in this case I think it’s pretty clear that that would be the extinction of something terribly valuable to world agriculture … because in the future you can imagine that drought- and heat-tolerant varieties of wheat, barley … lentils … chickpeas  and such are going to be in high demand.”

    https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/the-vault/

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  8. The Far Future

    How do we prepare for the distant future? Helen Keen meets the people who try to.

    If our tech society continues then we can leave data for future generations in huge, mundane quantities, detailing our every tweet and Facebook ‘like’. But how long could this information be stored? And if society as we know it ends, will our achievements vanish with it? How do we plan for and protect those who will be our distant descendants and yet may have hopes, fears, languages, beliefs, even religions that we simply cannot predict? What if anything can we, should we, pass on?

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05sxgvj

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