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Tagged with “presentation” (37)

  1. Maciej Ceglowski - Superintelligence: The Idea That Eats Smart People (Keynote)

    Talk given at WebCamp Zagreb 2016. https://2016.webcampzg.org/talks/view/superintelligence-the-idea-that-eats-smart-people/

    KEYNOTE A skeptical view on the seductive, apocalyptic beliefs that prevent people in tech from really working to make a difference. Apocalyptic ideas have traditionally been the province of religion, but nerds have found a way to import them into the world of computer programming. These ideas are a cognitive hazard that preferentially infects smart people, making them useless for more practical work. Like other forms of religious obsession, fantasies of superintelligence prevent us from tackling problems in this life by convincing us to focus on the life to come. This talk is an attempt to vaccinate the next generation of developers against the seductive ideas of existential risk, superintelligence, and the charismatic religious figures who will try to eat their brains.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kErHiET5YPw
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 08 Dec 2016 09:43:06 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Let Us Now Praise Ordinary People – Mike Monteiro – btconfBER2016

    Everywhere you turn, companies are promising to change the world. But when the people already on top promise to change the world, you have to wonder how and for whom. The how isn’t usually in your benefit, and the for whom isn’t usually for you. The world is working exactly as they’ve designed it to work. So if we really want to change it, we need to change not just how we design it, but who is designing it.

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    Original video: https://vimeo.com/190834270
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 11 Nov 2016 15:44:28 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Produced For Use: Brendan Dawes — New Adventures In Web Design conference

    It seems everyone is on a “journey” of some kind these days, and Brendan Dawes is no exception. His journey is trying to become a better maker of things and to learn from the humble often seemingly simple masterpieces that he bumps into everyday. In this session Brendan will share his love of making inspired by his continual obsession with simplicity and creating objects that are produced for use. Ultimately though it comes down to this: nobody needs to sharpen their pencil by inserting it into the arse of a plastic cat.

    http://2011.newadventuresconf.com/audio/brendan.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Adactio: Articles—Of Time And The Network

    A presentation about history, networks, and digital preservation, from the Webstock conference held in Wellington, New Zealand in February 2012.

    Our perception and measurement of time has changed as our civilisation has evolved. That change has been driven by networks, from trade routes to the internet. Now that we have the real-time web allowing instantaneous global communication, there’s a danger that we may neglect our legacy for the future. While the web has democratised publishing, allowing anyone to share ideas with a global audience, it doesn’t appear to be the best medium for preserving our cultural resources: websites and documents disappear down the digital memory hole every day. But we can change that. This presentation will offer an alternative history of technology and a fresh perspective on the future that is ours to save.

    http://adactio.com/articles/5312/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Adactio: Articles—Paranormal Interactivity

    A presentation on interaction design from An Event Apart 2010.

    Interaction is the secret sauce of the web. Understanding interaction is key to understanding the web as its own medium—it’s not print, it’s not television, and it’s certainly not the desktop.

    http://adactio.com/articles/5199/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Annalee Newitz - Your Business Plan Is Science Fiction —€“ And That’s a Good Thing

    Just two decades ago, the Web and public internet were the stuff of science fiction. Creators like William Gibson, who coined the term "cyberspace" in his novel Neuromancer, helped define the terms of social life online, as well as inspiring many of the inventions (like smartphones) that we take for granted. But what is today’s science fiction telling us about where our technology will go tomorrow? I’ll talk about the stories today’s scifi creators are telling about the Web and internet, and how their ideas create a fantastical map of what people are seeking in their online lives. Fiction – And That’s a Good Thing

    http://www.webstock.org.nz/talks/speakers/annalee-newitz/your-business-plan-science-fiction-and-s-good-thin/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Jane McGonigal — Gaming Reality

    Why doesn’t the real world work more like a game? In the best-designed games, our human experience is perfectly optimized: we have important work to do, we’re surrounded by potential allies, we get constant useful feedback, and we feel an insatiable curiosity about the world around us. That’s no accident — game developers have spent three decades figuring out how to make us happier, drive more collaboration, and satisfy our hunger for meaning and success. Isn’t it about time we started applying these insights to everything we do online? In this talk, game designer Jane McGonigal explains how to adopt game developer methods and mechanics to transform any networked community, service, experience or environment — in order to re-invent the real world as we know it.

    http://www.webstock.org.nz/talks/speakers/jane-mcgonigal/gaming-reality/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Adactio: Articles—All Our Yesterdays

    A presentation on digital preservation from the Build conference in Belfast in November 2011.

    Our communication methods have improved over time, from stone tablets, papyrus, and vellum through to the printing press and the World Wide Web. But while the web has democratised publishing, allowing anyone to share ideas with a global audience, it doesn’t appear to be the best medium for preserving our cultural resources: websites and documents disappear down the digital memory hole every day. This presentation will look at the scale of the problem and propose methods for tackling our collective data loss.

    http://adactio.com/articles/5176/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Open Source Rockets

    Portland State Aerospace Society (PSAS) is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We’re building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today.

    With the new proposed NASA budget eliminating the US manned spaceflight program and a heap of small private space companies popping up, the way we think about getting to space is changing. Is there room for open source in this brave new (space) world? PSAS has been working on open source avionics and hardware for small rockets for several years. We present our experience with, and thoughts on the future of, open source rocketry.

    http://opensourcebridge.org/sessions/407

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Hacking Space Exploration by Ariel Waldman

    From creating remote-sensing CubeSats to analyzing aerogel: how the public is hacking into open source space exploration.

    As technology shifts from a means of passive consumption to active creation, people are collaborating on a massive scale. The endeavor of Spacehack.org is to transform that into more of a community, so that space hackers can easily connect and interact.

    Amateurs were once considered to be at the crux of scientific discovery, but over time have been put on the sidelines. Despite this, citizen science is witnessing a renaissance. Agencies such as NASA no longer have a monopoly on the global space program and more participatory projects are coming to life to harness the power of open collaboration around exploring space on a faster schedule.

    Instead of complaining about where our jetpack is, we can now demand to figure out how to take an elevator to space . And, while you still can’t own a CubeSat as easily as an iPod, you can join a SEDSAT-2 team and learn how to engineer one.

    There’s also GalaxyZoo , which opened up a data set containing a million galaxies imaged by a robotic telescope. Why projects such as these are important is because robots are actually kind of dumb. Humans are able to make classifications that well-programmed machines can’t. Currently, 200,000 humans are identifying over 250,000 galaxies.

    If tinkering with spacecrafts is more your speed, the Google Lunar X PRIZE is a competition to send robots to the moon. However, you don’t need to be a robotics engineer to participate. Team FREDNET , the first open source competitor, is open for anyone to join.

    While the concept of open source has resonated around the world and beyond, there is still much education to be done. NASA and the ESA have made large quantities of their data open, but have yet to facilitate developer communities that allow for active contribution to the code rather than just feedback on finding bugs.

    Spacehack.org , a directory of ways to participate in space exploration, was created for this reason, among others. Many of these projects are buried in old government websites or do not clearly communicate how someone can get involved. It is with great hope that it will not only encourage the creation of more participatory space projects, but also urge existing ones to embrace the social web.

    http://lanyrd.com/2010/osbridge/sxzh/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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