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Tagged with “npr” (351)

  1. Loving Sally Ride

    Tam O’Shaughnessy and Sally Ride, the first American woman to fly in space — in 1983, aboard the space shuttle Challenger — shared a passion for getting girls involved in STEM. It led them to co-found Sally Ride Science, a company focused on equity and inclusion in science education.

    There was much more to O’Shaughnessy and Ride’s relationship, however. They met as kids in the early 1960s and developed an instant connection. Years later, they fell in love.

    https://www.npr.org/2021/06/22/1009098412/loving-sally-ride

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Science Movie Club: ‘Arrival’

    The 2016 movie ‘Arrival,’ an adaptation of Ted Chiang’s novella ‘Story of Your Life,’ captured the imaginations of science fiction fans worldwide. Field linguist Jessica Coon, who consulted on the film, breaks down what the movie gets right — and wrong — about linguistics.

    https://www.npr.org/2020/08/12/901705799/science-movie-club-arrival

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. What We Can Learn From Microscopic Life In Antarctica

    Our colleagues at the TED Radio Hour introduce us to wildlife filmmaker Ariel Waldman. She says the coldest continent is brimming with invisible life that can only be seen through microscopes, including tardigrades (one of Maddie’s favorite critters).

    https://www.npr.org/2021/03/29/982332996/what-we-can-learn-from-microscopic-life-in-antarctica

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. James West On Invention And Inclusion In Science

    James West has been a curious tinkerer since he was a child, always wondering how things worked. Throughout his long career in STEM, he’s also been an advocate for diversity and inclusion — from co-founding the Association for Black Laboratory Employees in 1970 to his work today with The Ingenuity Project, a non-profit that cultivates math and science skills in middle and high school students in Baltimore public schools.

    Host Maddie Sofia talks to him about his life, career, and about how a device he helped invent in the 60’s made their interview possible.

    https://www.npr.org/2021/02/22/970159013/james-west-on-invention-and-inclusion-in-science

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. How Octavia Butler’s Sci-Fi Dystopia Became A Constant In A Man’s Evolution

    It was middle school, eighth grade, when a sheltered 13-year-old boy suddenly found himself immersed in an unfamiliar world, guided by a girl who wasn’t much older, a girl on the verge of leading a religious movement.

    At first glance, it might appear as if all they had in common was age, but there was more. They were both growing up in religious households — she a Baptist in a walled community outside of Los Angeles, he a Muslim in suburban Maryland. And they shared a burning desire to understand the constantly evolving, confusing world they occupied.

    The boy was me. The girl, Lauren Oya Olamina, is, of course, the main character in Octavia Butler’s classic science fiction novel Parable of the Sower. We were introduced by an adventurous middle school English teacher who assigned the book to my class.

    https://www.npr.org/2021/02/16/968498810/how-octavia-butlers-sci-fi-dystopia-became-a-constant-in-a-mans-evolution

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Spinosaurus Makes Waves

    We chat with National Geographic Explorer and paleontologist Nizar Ibrahim about his team’s discovery of the Spinosaurus, the first known swimming dinosaur. The discovery and subsequent modeling showing the effectiveness of the Spinosaurus’s tail under water were detailed in Nature earlier this year.

    The years-long journey to uncover the fossilized remains ventures into Hollywood movie territory at times, and it all begins with a mustached Moroccan man wearing white.

    https://www.npr.org/2020/05/19/859162022/spinosaurus-makes-waves

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Science Movie Club: ‘Contact’

    Yes, there actually are astronomers looking for intelligent life in space. The 1997 film adaptation of Carl Sagan’s ‘Contact’ got a lot of things right … and a few things wrong. Radio astronomer Summer Ash, an education specialist with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, breaks down the science in the film.

    https://www.npr.org/2020/05/20/859365245/science-movie-club-contact

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. An Unfinished Lesson: What The 1918 Flu Tells Us About Human Nature

    It’s easy to stare out your window at the nearly empty streets, at the people wearing masks and leaving a six-foot berth for passersby, and to believe that this is a moment unlike any other. To assume that the fear, the haphazard responses to the pandemic, the radical adjustments people are making to their lives—that these are all unprecedented.

    But like most extraordinary moments, this one has a long trail that leads to it. Just over a century ago, a new infectious disease overtook the globe. Its history has long been buried, subsumed beneath the story of World War I. Historian Nancy Bristow believes it’s no mistake that Americans have focused on their victory in the war rather than on the devastation of the 1918 flu pandemic.

    https://www.npr.org/2020/03/23/820066211/an-unfinished-lesson-what-the-1918-flu-tells-us-about-human-nature

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. The Room of Requirement - This American Life

    Libraries aren’t just for books. They’re often spaces that transform into what you need them to be: a classroom, a cyber café, a place to find answers, a quiet spot to be alone. It’s actually kind of magical. This week, we have stories of people who roam the stacks and find unexpected things that just happen to be exactly what they required.

    https://www.thisamericanlife.org/664/the-room-of-requirement

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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