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Tagged with “music” (393)

  1. Swan Lake

    The story behind Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake and the impact it has had on audiences.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00djtj8

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  2. Who Knows Where the Time Goes?

    Memories of the much-loved song Who Knows Where the Time Goes? written by Sandy Denny.

    Sandy Denny was just 19 years old when she wrote ‘Who Knows Where the Time Goes?’, her much-loved song about the passing of time. Soul Music tells the story behind the song and speaks to people for whom it has special meaning.

    The record producer Joe Boyd and founder member of Fairport Convention Simon Nicol remember Sandy and her music. We speak to musicians who have covered the song, including folk legend Judy Collins and the singer Rufus Wainwright, about what the song means to them. And we hear from people whose lives have been touched by the song, including the singer-songwriter Ren Harvieu, who suffered a back break in a freak accident and found strength in the song during her recovery. And neuroscientist and best-selling author David Eagleman explains why the years seem to fly past ever more quickly as we grow older. Also featuring contributions from Sandy Denny’s biographer Mick Houghton and Dr Richard Elliott, Senior Lecturer in Music at Newcastle University.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08tcnmk

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  3. Wichita Lineman

    People reflect on the emotional impact of the country-pop crossover track.

    Wichita Lineman, the ultimate country/pop crossover track, is the subject of this week’s Soul Music.

    David Crary is a lineman from Oklahoma. He describes his job - storm-chasing to mend fallen power-lines; travelling on ‘dirt roads, gravel roads, paved roads… up in the farmlands of Illinois and Missouri… down south in the Swamplands… it ain’t nothing to swerve in the middle of the road in your bucket-truck to miss an alligator ‘.

    He recalls the first time he heard Wichita Lineman, travelling in the back of his family’s Station Wagon, listening to the radio… thinking that being a lineman ‘must be a cool job’ if someone’s written a song about it. Also a part-time musician, David has recorded his own version of the song which sums up his working life… on the road, working long hours, away from his wife and six kids.

    Wichita Lineman was written by Jimmy Webb for the Country star Glen Campbell. It tells the story of a lonely lineman in the American midwest, travelling vast distances to mend power and telephone lines.

    Released in 1968 it’s an enduring classic, crossing the boundary between pop and country. It’s been covered many times, but it’s Glen Campbell’s version which remains the best loved and most played.

    Johnny Cash also recorded an extraordinary and very raw version. Peter Lewry, a lifelong Cash fan, describes how this recording came about, towards the end of Cash’s career.

    Meggean Ward’s father was a lineman in Rhode Island… her memories of seeing him in green work trousers, a plaid shirt and black boots, wrapping his cracked hands in bandages every morning before setting off to climb telephone poles are interwoven forever with Wichita Lineman… as a child she always felt the song was written for her father, who else?

    Glen Campbell also gave an interview for this programme. Shortly after the interview was recorded, Campbell went public about his diagnosis of Alzheimer’s. His contribution to the programme is brief, and includes an acoustic performance of the song. It was a real privilege to record this, appropriately enough, down the line.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b013f96w

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  4. Episode 07-The Piper | shannonheatonmusic.com

    It’s honeybee season. And if all is well, bee colonies are at or near peak population this month.

    Also buzzing down the mountainside: a poverty of pipers, to help me dissect uilleann pipe logistics, lure, and lore. For “The Piper” I talk to the Rowsome family, Tim Britton, Tom Rota, Patrick Hutchinson, and Isaac Alderson.

    Now, the Irish uilleann pipes CAN drip with sweet, rich melody. And they are also as temperamental as hornets, as Tom Rota describes:

    “You know, I don’t want to play anything else, but sometimes I just want to throw them on a fire and just be done with it. They’re hard to tune and maintain. Some days they sound great, and then two hours later they sound terrible… so pipers have this kind of built in sarcastic irony going on, this kind of love hate thing with the instrument, which I think is part of the tradition, really. And it’s really kind of fun.” –T. Rota

    Pipers can lead a double life — as Irish musicians who play tunes together and enjoy deep social connections. And also as players of this demanding, temperamental, complicated contraption that only fellow pipers can truly understand. Pipers seem to connect to pipers of the past, perhaps even more than other instruments do with their predecessors. Patrick Hutchinson explained this beautifully:

    “The tradition is a conversation between those who’ve gone before us and those who are here now. And they’re not gone, because the way they play is preserved in people’s fingers. And when you play and you quote other players, as pipers do, those other players are brought into the conversation.” — P. Hutchinson

    These days people play the uilleann pipes all over the world. Some do come from five generations of pipers, but many come to it from non-musical families. As Isaac Alderson notes,

    “It doesn’t matter where you’re from: who you are, where you came from. But what matters is the spirit and heart you bring to it… If you approach it with respect and a genuine desire to become proficient, I think it’s wide open.” –I. Alderson

    I hope you’ll tune in on this conversation about uilleann pipes. Whether you already know about Seamus Ennis—or you don’t know anything about Irish culture—these conversations speak about challenge, gratitude, and reverence.

    Tune: “Silver Spear,” from Kitty Lie OverArtists: Mick O’Brien & Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh

    Tune: “Heartstrings Theme” from Production Music Made for Irish Music Stories

    Artist: Matt Heaton

    Tune: “Tom Billy’s Butcher’s March,” from Swimming Against the FallsArtist: Joey Abarta

    Tune: “Triumph Theme” from Production Music Made for Irish Music Stories

    Artist: Matt Heaton

    Tune: “Padraig O’Keefe’s 1 & 2/The Humours Of Ballydaly” from Notes from the HeartArtists: Louise and Michelle Mulcahy

    Tune: “The Praties are Dug and the Frost is All Over” from 40 Years of Piping

    Artist: Seamus Ennis

    Tune: “Pipe Solo – Slow Air” from Standing Barefoot at the AltarArtist: Tim Britton with Chulrua

    Tune: “McFarley’s/Mill Na Maídí” from Harvest StormArtist: Altan

    Tune: “Jackson’s Frieze Coat” from Irish Wind MusicArtist: Bill Ochs

    Tune: “Kesh Jig” from In ConcertArtist: Bothy Band

    Tune: “The Old Coolun” from Take Me TenderArtist: Jimmy O’Brien Moran

    Tune: “Garret Barry’s/The Bucks of Oranmore” from In ConcertArtist: Paddy Keenan with the Bothy Band

    http://shannonheatonmusic.com/episode-07-the-piper/

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  5. Kate Bush’s Sonic Weapon

    Can sound kill? Inspired by a Kate Bush song, we ask whether sonic weapons could work.

    "It started while listening to the excellent Experiment IV by Kate Bush. The premise of the song is of a band who secretly work for the military to create a ‘sound that could kill someone’. Is it scientifically possible to do this?" asks Paul Goodfield.

    Hannah consults acoustic engineer Trevor Cox to ask if sonic weapons could kill. And Adam delves into subsonic frequencies with parapsychologist Chris French to investigate their spooky effects.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08svx8y

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  6. Troika #30: 85–87 | Hicks Journal

    A lot of Troika episodes are auto-biographical, and this one is no exception. This time, I want to revisit the years 85, 86 and 87, when I was a fan of three bands, all roughly linked in a family tree.

    https://hicksdesign.co.uk/journal/troika-30-8587

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  7. Episode 06-The Backer | shannonheatonmusic.com

    For this sixth episode of Irish Music Stories (a shorter summer special!), I talked to some of trad music’s most inspired accompanists. It was great to hear about the inner game of backing from Matt Heaton, Neil Pearlman, Keith Murphy, and John Doyle.

    Now, singers and accordion players can also certainly ride a rhythmic wave in a session, or sculpt a song with color, texture, and deep care for the storyline. But there’s a particular experience that chordal players have with Irish music. I wanted to understand that feeling a bit more.

    John Doyle talks about the meditative quality of backing:

    “When you play in a good session, when it’s super rhythmic, you get into this flow state, especially when you’re rhythmic. It’s a very Zen-like, momentary space.. I think it’s a place where very few people get to in life. And then it’s broken when the tune ends… and of course, there’s an enjoyment, the love of music.”

    Pianist Neil Pearlman (who also hosts a great podcast called TradCafe) shared his thoughts on how a broader perspective shapes players and playing: “Traditional music is cultural music… knowing other people who play, dance, or speak with an Irish accent all go into some subtle sense of feel in the music.”

    And guitarist Matt Heaton says, “There are such cool things you can do with harmony. You can add tension, you can build suspense, you can make something sound bright and happy.. you can shine a light on certain aspects of the melody, sort of illuminate it.”

    I hope you’ll join me as I talk with Matt, Neil, Keith and John about how they think about backing traditional music.

    Whether you already play guitar, sing ballads, or dance steps.. or if you don’t know anything about Irish culture… these conversations concern deep listening, community, and flow state.

    http://shannonheatonmusic.com/episode-06-the-backer/

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  8. Episode 05-Handed Down | shannonheatonmusic.com

    It’s warming up in many corners of the world, and many players are heading to Summer Music Camps!

    But of course, music camps are just ONE way that Irish traditional music is handed down. And for this episode, I traveled to Pearl River, NY, Galway City, and to neighborhoods around Boston, to talk with musicians about how they learned their music, and how this has led them to pass it on.

    Séan Clohessy

    There’s big picture inspiration here from Sean Clohessy:“We have rhythm all around us—whether it’s breathing, a heart beat, blinking, walking, the seasons.. there’s rhythm in everything. Irish music is an easy way to perceive a lot of these things, and see things we can’t see with our eyes.”

    And there are intimate Irish music house sessions and concerts that have inspired Josie Coyne:“Falling asleep listening to amazing music, ever since I was really young.To meet all these musicians.. It’s pretty great.”

    And wisdom from Séamus Connolly, whose Collection of Irish Music is available online to all!“If traditional music is locked up, it doesn’t advance or move on. It’s very much a living tradition, and it should be that way.”

    Flanagan, Mulvahill, Furlong

    I hope you’ll join me as I talk with Rose Flanagan, Margie Mulvahill, Patty Furlong, Séan Clohessy, Josie and her dad John Coyne, Louis DePaor, Seamus Connolly, and Elizabeth Sweeney about their activities around traditional music, and how they feel about passing it on.

    Whether you already play tunes, sing ballads, dance sean nós steps.. or you don’t know anything about Irish culture… these conversations speak about friendships, community, and generosity.

    Seamus Connolly

    Read on for full music and poetry credits below. And take a peek at one of this month’s guests, Josie Coyne. This was back in 2013 (she’s 4 years older now..), when she joined fiddler Mick Conneely for a set.

    And here is Séamus Connolly at the NEA National Heritage Fellowship Concert from June 2014:

    Next month’s episode will air Tuesday July 11th. It’ll be a summer short about backers (accompanists). And on Thursday July 13th, I’ll be guest host of the Celtic Music Podcast. Hope you’ll check it out!

    Music Heard on IMS Episode 05

    all music traditional, unless otherwise indicated

    Tune: “Tap Room, Mountain Road, Galway Rambler” (reels), from Rehearsal recording from circa 2009

    Artist: Dan Gurney (accordion), Shannon Heaton (flute), Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Tune: “Travel Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “After Hours Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “Broken Clock,” from A Sweeter PlaceArtist: Girsa, feat. Maeve Flanagan (fiddle),

    Composer: Maeve Flanagan

    Tune: “Grupai Ceol Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “Heartstrings Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “Tom Ashe’s March,” from Rehearsal recording from circa 2009

    Artist: Dan Gurney (accordion), Shannon Heaton (flute), Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Tune: “Seán Sa Cheo,” from one of the 78 rpm recordings made for Regal Zonophone

    Artist: Neilidh Boyle (fiddle)

    Tune: “Triumph Theme,” from Production music made for Irish Music StoriesArtist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

    Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton

    Tune: “Katie’s Fancy” (jig), live in Rose’s Kitchen, 2016

    Artist: Rose Flanagan (fiddle), Patty Furlong (accordion), Margie Mulvahill (flute)

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Thank you for listening. And thanks to Rose Flanagan, Patty Furlong, Margie Mulvahill, Séan Clohessy, Josie and her dad John Coyne, Louis DePaor, Seamus Connolly, and Elizabeth Sweeney for the beautiful conversations. Thanks, as always, to Matt Heaton for the beautiful guitar underscore, and for invaluable support to make these episodes.

    http://shannonheatonmusic.com/episode-05-handed-down/

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  9. Bob Dylan - Nobel Lecture

    The Nobel Foundation has not obtained the right to assign any usage right to the Nobel Lecture to any third party, and any such rights may thus not be granted. All rights to the Nobel Lecture by Bob Dylan are reserved and the Nobel Lecture may not be published or otherwise used by third parties with one exception: the audio file containing the Nobel Lecture, as published at Nobelprize.org, the official website of the Nobel Prize, may be embedded on other websites.

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/nobelprize/bob-dylan-nobel-lecture
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 07 Jun 2017 10:41:20 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  10. Ep. #323: Nick Cave and Warren Ellis | Kreative Kontrol

    Nick Cave and Warren Ellis are two of the world’s most iconic, influential, and inspiring musicians working today. Originally from Australia, Nick Cave has altered the course of rock ‘n’ roll and invented a new kind of leading man in bands like the Birthday Party and Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds. His countryman Warren Ellis is a gifted and daring multi-instrumentalist, renowned for his work in Dirty Three and he joined Cave, as a member of the Bad Seeds, in the mid-1990s. The pair have become close collaborators in the Bad Seeds, they worked together in a a now defunct band called Grinderman, and together they’ve also composed riveting and acclaimed scores and soundtracks for theatrical productions and films like The Proposition, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, The Road, Hell or High Water, and most recently, the feature films War Machine and Django. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds dispatched a well-received album called Skeleton Tree in the fall of 2016 and in May of 2017, Mute Records released a comprehensive retrospective called Lovely Creatures: The Best of Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds (1984-2014), and they’ve been touring behind these efforts lately. Captured in a hotel restaurant on the afternoon of their second sold out show at Massey Hall in Toronto, here Warren and Nick discuss their history as friends and colleagues, how Warren wound up in the Bad Seeds, how they work together and their relationships to melody and noise, Nick’s unique relationship with his audience and why he needs them now, recording Skeleton Tree, upcoming plans, and much more. Sponsored by Pizza Trokadero, the Bookshelf, and Planet Bean Coffee.

    http://vishkhanna.com/2017/06/06/ep-323-nick-cave-and-warren-ellis/

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