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Tagged with “maps” (26)

  1. Podcast #28: Rational Geographic — Map Chat with Aaron Straup Cope

    The history and the future of geotagging: this week Paul Ford and Rich Ziade talk to Aaron Straup Cope, a programmer who works with maps and geographical datasets. The conversation covers his time as one of Flickr’s earliest employees, data visualization, gazetteers, the evils of Wal-Mart, geocoding (and reverse geocoding), and one of the most controversial decisions in online mapping — Google’s decision to cut off the poles and make the world a square.

    https://trackchanges.postlight.com/podcast-28-rational-geographic-map-chat-with-aaron-straup-cope-b0006e8e8fc5

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Interact London 2015: Ben Scott-Robinson

    Designing change:­ How OS is learning to love the customer

    In the old world, the maps of Ordnance Survey were a work of art, patiently learnt by avid users. Now, impatient users expect products to be immediately intuitive. Changing to a user centred world means changing the way OS creates its products. It means changing the way the company works.

    Find out how a British institution is adapting to design thinking, and learning to love its customers.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAUdoFIyQ1g
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Forecasting the Future of Maps

    02/20/2015 Legal Battle Ends, But Seas Continue to Rise in Kivalina, Alaska Habitats Shift As Arctic Temps Creep Above Freezing Is Your Empty Stomach Fueling Your Shopping Spree? What Bilingual Babies Can Teach Us About Language Learning Are Women at Greater Risk for Alzheimer’s? Forecasting the Future of Maps ARCHIVE 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 SUBSCRIBE Podcast FEB. 20, 2015 Forecasting the Future of Maps

    Google Maps app displayed on a phone, from Shutterstock

    Listen Later on Stitcher

    Google Maps celebrated its 10-year anniversary this month. In that decade, web and mobile mapping companies have sprung up to chart the corner of every city and integrate real time transportation data into these maps. What will the maps of the future look like, and will they help us move from point A to point B more efficiently?

    http://sciencefriday.com/segment/02/20/2015/forecasting-the-future-of-maps.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Ten years of Google Maps – Tech Weekly podcast

    On this week’s Tech Weekly podcast, we mark Google Maps’ 10th anniversary – yes, it has been 10 whole years since digital maps hit the mainstream and banished the A to Z from people’s bags.

    Gary Gale from the UK’s Ordnance Survey joins us down the line to talk about the company’s mapping initiatives around digital maps and where maps go next – indoors.

    Plus professor Mark Graham from the Oxford Internet Institute discusses how the geographies of the internet have reconfigured how people engage with the city.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/feb/11/tech-weekly-podcast-10-years-of-google-maps

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. A History of the World in Maps - Late Night Live - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Throughout history, maps have always been as much about their creators and their worldviews as about reproducing an accurate replica of the world. Early maps were also about the unknown and how to display the borders of the known world. Monsters in illustration were often used to represent what lay beyond the edge of the world, and cartographers competed to create the best and scariest monsters on their creations.

    Professor and BBC documentary presenter Jeremy Brotton has produced a study of the cultural values embodied in maps and collected them in a book called A History of the World in Twelve Maps.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/latenightlive/a-history-of-the-world-in-maps/4491276

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Interview: Jerry Brotton, Author Of ‘A History of the World in Twelve Maps’ | Mapping Our World View : NPR

    In A History of the World in Twelve Maps, Jerry Brotton examines the construction of a dozen world maps throughout history, and argues that world maps are no more objective today than they were thousands of years ago.

    http://www.npr.org/2012/11/22/165727166/the-motive-of-the-mapmaker

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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