adactio / tags / love

Tagged with “love” (23)

  1. Adactio: Articles—A

    The opening keynote from the inaugural HTML Special held before CSS Day 2016 in Amsterdam.

    https://adactio.com/articles/10887

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Enchanting By Numbers (2015 version) | Benjamen Walker’s Theory of Everything

    We take another look at algorithms. Tim Hwang explains how Uber’s algorithms generate phantom cars and marketplace mirages. And we revisit our conversation with Christian Sandvig who, last year asked Facebook users to explain how they imagine the Edgerank algorithm works (this is the algorithm that powers Facebook’s news feed). Sandvig discovered that most of his subjects had no idea there even was an algorithm at work. Plus  James Essinger and Suw Charman-Anderson, tell us about Ada Lovelace, the woman who wrote the first computer program (or as James puts it – Algorithm)  in 1843.

    https://toe.prx.org/2015/10/enchanting-by-numbers-2015-version/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. BBC Radio 4 - In Pod We Trust, Stories from the Heart

    Miranda Sawyer explores personal storytelling with podcasters Anna Sale and Lea Thau.

    Miranda Sawyer continues her exploration into the world of podcasts by rounding up some of the best from around the globe.

    This week’s programme features personal storytelling concerning issues which some of us find it hard to talk about: love, sex, family and money. Matters of the heart.

    Guests include Anna Sale, creator and host of New York-based podcast, "Death, Sex and Money", and Lea Thau, who documented her own love life in a series for Los Angeles-based Strangers podcast "Love Hurts".

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06p46bp

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Dark Patterns and Ada Lovelace - Tech Weekly podcast | Technology | The Guardian

    How user interfaces are designed to trick us. Plus, the legacy of Victorian computing pioneer Ada Lovelace.

    Ever subscribed to a mailing list by mistake? Booked travel insurance without noticing? Then you’ve fallen for a Dark Pattern.

    This week on the podcast we investigate the murky world of Dark Patterns: user interfaces that use psychological techniques to trick us into doing things we might otherwise not do.

    And as a new exhibition dedicated to Ada Lovelace opens at the Science Museum, we find out why the Victorian computing whizz is the hottest ticket in town 200 years on.

    Nathalie Nahai is joined by digital product designer Cennydd Bowles, Channel 4 News tech journalist Geoff White, designer Dan Lockton and Science Museum curator Tilly Blyth.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/oct/22/dark-patterns-ada-lovelace-tech-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Meet the most famous woman in computing you’ve probably never heard of

    To prevent Ada Lovelace from acquiring the crazy poetic temperament of her father, Lord Byron, Ada’s mother forced her to study the cool logic of mathematics.

    http://www.pri.org/stories/2014-12-23/meet-most-famous-woman-computing-youve-probably-never-heard

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Song Exploder | Episode 25: The National

    The National formed in 1999. They’ve released six albums, and have been nominated for a grammy. Their music is everywhere from Game of Thrones, to Bob’s Burgers, to Barack Obama’s presidential campaign. In 2013 they released their sixth album, Trouble Will Find Me, which debuted at #3 on the Billboard charts. The band is made up of singer Matt Berninger along with two sets of brothers: guitarists Bryce and Aaron Dessner, who are twins, and Brian and Scott Devendorf, who play drums and bass, respectively. In this episode, Matt Berninger and Aaron Dessner break down “Sea of Love,” a song that they co-wrote. You’ll hear how it went from Aaron’s original guitar demo to a densely layered recording with contributions from their bandmates and others, and they’ll talk about how collaboration is an intrinsic part of their process and their band identity.

    http://songexploder.net/episode-25-the-national/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. The Businesswoman

    "I don’t know you and you don’t know me," I said. "I could tell you any secret and it wouldn’t matter."

    "It’s funny you should mention that," she said, "because I’ve got a secret I’ve only told my closest friend."

    https://soundcloud.com/loveandradio/the-businesswoman

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. A Point of View: Lisa Jardine: Machine Intelligence

    Weekly reflections on topical issues from a range of contributors including historian Lisa Jardine, novelist Sarah Dunant and writer Alain de Botton.

    Lisa Jardine compares the contributions of Ada Lovelace and Alan Turing a century later to computer science and contrasts their views on the potential of and limits to machine intelligence. Producer: Sheila Cook

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/pov

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Reith Lectures — Bernard Lovell: The Individual and the Universe, Part 2, 1958

    Astronomer, physicist and the first director of the Jodrell Bank Experimental Observatory Professor Bernard Lovell explores the continuous creation theory of the universe in the final lecture of his Reith Lectures series ‘The Individual and the Universe’.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/rla48/all

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Reith Lectures — Bernard Lovell: The Individual and the Universe, Part 1, 1958

    Astronomer, physicist and the first director of the Jodrell Bank Experimental Observatory Professor Bernard Lovell contemplates the implications of evolutionary theory in the fifth lecture in his Reith Lectures series ‘The Individual and the Universe’.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/rla48/all

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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