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Tagged with “live” (54)

  1. Clive Thompson: How Tech Remade the World | Commonwealth Club

    When we think of the people behind the most influential technological advances of our day, we usually imagine the leaders of the industry but forget the armies behind them: coders. Dedicated to the pursuit of higher efficiency, these lovers of logic and puzzles are able to withstand unbelievable amounts of frustration; they are arguably the most quietly influential people on the planet.

    In his new book, Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World, Clive Thompson argues just that. Through increasingly pervasive artificial intelligence, coders have a larger and larger role to play. Thompson analyzes how embedded this industry is in our lives, questioning the lack of geographic and demographic diversity in the sector while outlining his optimistic view on the opportunities that this age of code can unlock. Join us for a conversation about this frequently misunderstood industry culture and a refreshingly enthusiastic take on its future. 

    Thompson is a freelance journalist and one of the most prominent technology writers. He is a longtime contributor to The New York Times Magazine and a columnist for Wired. 

    https://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/archive/podcast/clive-thompson-how-tech-remade-world

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  2. Function \\ F11: Social Media, 20 Years Ago

    On Function, our focus is about how technology has influenced culture and communications, and nothing encompasses the intersection of these concepts more than social media. It’s allowed us to express our innermost feelings, meet people that share our interests, and find community with others from all over the world.

    This week, we’re doing something a little different. Anil sits down with some of the pioneers of the social web — Bruce Ableson (founder of Open Diary), Lisa Phillips (former senior system administrator at LiveJournal), and Andrew Smales (founder of Diaryland) — for an oral history about social media 20 years ago. What was the Web like in 1999? How did these websites begin, and what did the media think about them? How have the features of these networks influenced the Web that we know today, and can we get that old feeling back of the early social web?

    https://glitch.com/culture/function-episode-11/

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  3. Oliver Sipple - Radiolab

    In a flash of heroism and humanity, Oliver Sipple saved a life and became something he never wanted to be.

    One morning, Oliver Sipple went out for a walk. A couple hours later, to his own surprise, he saved the life of the President of the United States. But in the days that followed, Sipple’s split-second act of heroism turned into a rationale for making his personal life into political opportunity. What happens next makes us wonder what a moment, or a movement, or a whole society can demand of one person. And how much is too much?

    Through newly unearthed archival tape, we hear Sipple himself grapple with some of the most vexing topics of his day and ours - privacy, identity, the freedom of the press - not to mention the bonds of family and friendship.

    http://www.radiolab.org/story/oliver-sipple/

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  4. Developing the Underlying Concepts for Contemporary Computing - Computing Lives - IEEECS

    A discussion about the 30-year history of research and development that created the underlying technologies on which the Web is based. Much of this foundation was laid in the 1960s by Douglas Carl Engelbart.

    https://www.computer.org/web/computing-lives/home/-/blogs/developing-the-underlying-concepts-for-contemporary-computing

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  5. The First Computer Dating

    In 1959, two Stanford undergraduate electrical engineering students enrolled in Math 139, Theory and Operation of Computing Machines, and as a final class project, devised the first known attempt at computer dating.

    From the analytical engine to the supercomputer, from Pascal to von Neumann, from punched cards to CD-ROMs-the "Computing Lives" Podcast of selected articles from the IEEE Annals of the History of Computing cover the breadth of computer history. This Podcast series features scholarly accounts by leading computer scientists and historians, as well as firsthand stories by computer pioneers.

    You can also get more computing history with IEEE Annals of the History of Computing.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. #464: Invisible Made Visible

    The radio version of an episode we did live on stage and beamed to movie theaters. David Sedaris, Tig Notaro, Ryan Knighton, and the late David Rakoff, in his final performance on the show.

    The other half of this two-hour show was visual, including dancers, animation, and more. You can download video of the entire show.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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