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Tagged with “linguistics” (107)

  1. Science(ish): Arrival

    The boys start the new series with a bang. And a new format. One question, one scientist, plenty of relatively well-informed chat. To kick off, Rick and Michael go extra-terrestrial with 2016’s linguistic thriller ‘Arrival’. We’re talking a hundred words for snow, we’re talking babies on an island, and we’re talking (not so) Universal Grammar.

    Featuring: Dr Jessica Coon

    https://www.radiowolfgang.com/s/scienceish/arrival

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  2. Science Movie Club: ‘Arrival’

    The 2016 movie ‘Arrival,’ an adaptation of Ted Chiang’s novella ‘Story of Your Life,’ captured the imaginations of science fiction fans worldwide. Field linguist Jessica Coon, who consulted on the film, breaks down what the movie gets right — and wrong — about linguistics.

    https://www.npr.org/2020/08/12/901705799/science-movie-club-arrival

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  3. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Language and the Mind

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the history of our ideas about the formation of language. The psychologist George Miller worked out that in English there are potentially a hundred million trillion sentences of twenty words in length - that’s a hundred times the number of seconds since the birth of the universe. “Language”, as Chomsky put it, “makes infinite use of finite media”. “Language”, as Steven Pinker puts it, “comes so naturally to us that it’s easy to forget what a strange and miraculous gift it is”. “All over the world”, he writes, “members of our species spend a good part of their lives fashioning their breath into hisses and hums and squeaks and pops and are listening to others do the same”. Jean Jacques Rousseau once said that we differ from the animal kingdom in two main ways - the use of language and the prohibition of incest. Language and our ability to learn it has been held up traditionally as our species’ most remarkable achievement, marking us apart from the animals. But in the 20th century, our ideas about how language is formed are being radically challenged and altered. With Dr Jonathan Miller, medical doctor, performer, broadcaster, author and film and opera director; Steven Pinker, cognitive scientist, Professor of Psychology and Director of the Centre for Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, California.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00545cr

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  4. Why it’s time to stop worrying about the decline of the English language – podcast | News | The Guardian

    People often complain that English is deteriorating under the influence of new technology, adolescent fads and loose grammar. Why does this nonsensical belief persist?

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2019/sep/13/why-its-time-to-stop-worrying-about-the-decline-of-the-english-language-podcast

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  5. John McWhorter on the Evolution of Language and Words on the Move - Econlib

    How did bad come to mean good? Why is Shakespeare so hard to understand? Is there anything good about "like" and "you know?" Author and professor John McWhorter of Columbia University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the unplanned ways that English speakers create English, an example of emergent order. Topics discussed include how words get short (but not too short), the demand for vividness in language, and why Shakespeare is so hard to understand.

    http://www.econtalk.org/john-mcwhorter-on-the-evolution-of-language-and-words-on-the-move/

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  6. Oh For Cute - 8 October 2018

    A stereotype is a preconceived notion about a person or group. Originally, though, the word stereotype referring to a printing device used to produce lots of identical copies. If you suspect there’s a connection, you’re right!  Also, the link between tiny mythical creatures called trolls and modern-day mischief-makers, plus the stories behind the color names we give to horses. Finally, wise advice about fending off despair: learn something new. Also, grinslies, personal summers, cowboy slang, smell vs. odor, orient vs. orientate, trolls and trolling, and just for fun, some agentive and instrumental exocentric verb-noun compounds.

    http://feeds.waywordradio.org/~r/awwwpodcast/~3/eySt5vvnMBc/181008-AWWW-Oh-For-Cute.mp3

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Slice of PIE: a linguistic common ancestor – Science Weekly podcast | Science | The Guardian

    Nicola Davis explores the hypothetical common ancestor of modern Indo-European languages and asks, where did it come from? How and why did it spread? And do languages evolve like genes?

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2018/jun/29/slice-of-pie-proto-indo-european-linguistic-common-ancestor-science-weekly-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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