adactio / tags / life

Tagged with “life” (58)

  1. No Coincidence, No Story! - This American Life

    We asked listeners to send us their best coincidence stories, and we got more than 1,300 submissions! There were so many good ones we decided to make a whole show about them. From a chance encounter at a bus station to a romantic dollar bill to a baffling apparition in a college shower stall.

    https://www.thisamericanlife.org/489/no-coincidence-no-story

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. What does it mean to be alive? Paul Nurse on defining ‘life’ | Science | The Guardian

    Is it possible to define the biological, chemical and physical functions that separate cells, plants and even humans from inanimate objects? In his new book, Paul Nurse, Nobel prize winner and director of the Francis Crick Institute, addresses a question that has long plagued both philosophers and scientists – what does it really mean to be alive? Speaking to Madeleine Finlay, Paul delves into why it’s important to understand the underlying principles of life, the role of science in society, and what life might look like on other planets

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2020/sep/22/what-does-it-mean-to-be-alive-paul-nurse-on-defining-life

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Tali Sharot: The optimism bias | TED Talk

    Are we born to be optimistic, rather than realistic? Tali Sharot shares new research that suggests our brains are wired to look on the bright side — and how that can be both dangerous and beneficial.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/tali_sharot_the_optimism_bias?referrer=playlist-why_we_do_the_things_we_do

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Nora McInerny: We don’t “move on” from grief. We move forward with it | TED Talk

    In a talk that’s by turns heartbreaking and hilarious, writer and podcaster Nora McInerny shares her hard-earned wisdom about life and death. Her candid approach to something that will, let’s face it, affect us all, is as liberating as it is gut-wrenching. Most powerfully, she encourages us to shift how we approach grief. "A grieving person is going to laugh again and smile again," she says. "They’re going to move forward. But that doesn’t mean that they’ve moved on."

    https://www.ted.com/talks/nora_mcinerny_we_don_t_move_on_from_grief_we_move_forward_with_it

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. The Life Scientific: Michele Dougherty on Saturn

    Michele Dougherty tells Jim Al-Khalili why she diverted the Cassini mission to Saturn.

    The Cassini mission into deep space has witnessed raging storms, flown between Saturn’s enigmatic rings and revealed seven new moons. And, thanks in no small part to Professor Michele Dougherty, it’s made some astonishing discoveries. For the last twenty years, Michele been responsible for one of the key instruments on board Cassini - the magnetometer. In 2005, she spotted a strange signature in the data during a distant fly by of Saturn’s smaller moons, Enceladus and became curious. Now,space missions are planned years ahead of time. Every detail is nailed down. But Michele convinced mission control to divert Cassini from its carefully planned route to take a closer look at Enceladus. And her gamble paid off. Cassini scientists soon discovered jets of water vapour and organic material shooting out of the south pole of Enceladus, not bad for a small moon that could so easily have been ignored. It’s now thought that this tiny moon might be able to support microbial life underneath its icy surface.

    In 2008, Michele was awarded the hugely prestigious Hughes medal for her work - an honour last given to a woman in 1906! She’s also been voted by the UK Science Council as one of the country’s top 100 living scientists. She talks to Jim al-Khalili about growing up in South Africa, moving from mathematics to managing space missions and what they hope will happen when Cassini crashes into Saturn later this year.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b087qjcw

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. The Room of Requirement - This American Life

    Libraries aren’t just for books. They’re often spaces that transform into what you need them to be: a classroom, a cyber café, a place to find answers, a quiet spot to be alone. It’s actually kind of magical. This week, we have stories of people who roam the stacks and find unexpected things that just happen to be exactly what they required.

    https://www.thisamericanlife.org/664/the-room-of-requirement

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. BBC Radio 4 - The Life Scientific, Stephanie Shirley on computer coding

    As a young woman, Stephanie Shirley worked at the Dollis Hill Research Station building computers from scratch: but she told young admirers that she worked for the Post Office, hoping they would think she sold stamps. In the early 60s she changed her name to Steve and started selling computer programmes to companies who had no idea what they were or what they could do, employing only mothers who worked from home writing code by hand with pen and pencil and then posted it to her. By the mid-80s her software company employed eight thousand people, still mainly women with children. She made an absolute fortune but these days Stephanie thinks less about making money and much more about how best to give it away.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05pmvl8

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Tabetha Boyajian: The most mysterious star in the universe | TED Talk

    Something massive, with roughly 1,000 times the area of Earth, is blocking the light coming from a distant star known as KIC 8462852, and nobody is quite sure what it is. As astronomer Tabetha Boyajian investigated this perplexing celestial object, a colleague suggested something unusual: Could it be an alien-built megastructure? Such an extraordinary idea would require extraordinary evidence. In this talk, Boyajian gives us a look at how scientists search for and test hypotheses when faced with the unknown.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/tabetha_boyajian_the_most_mysterious_star_in_the_universe

    —Huffduffed by adactio

Page 1 of 6Older