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Tagged with “lecture” (28)

  1. Utopian science fictions legitimising our current dystopia – 2019 Taylor Lecture, Oxford University – Yanis Varoufakis

    The Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages, Oxford University, kindly invited me to deliver the 2019 Taylor Lecture on 12th February 2019. I chose the topic of Realistic Utopias versus Dystopic Realities – my aim being to highlight the manner in which really-existing capitalism is marketed as a utopian science fiction that has nothing to do with… really-existing capitalism. Behind this elegant utopian mathematical the powers-that-be hide a dismal dystopia that is failing humanity in a variety of ways. Plato, King Lear, Coriolanus and the Borg Queen make cameo appearances…

    https://www.yanisvaroufakis.eu/2019/02/19/utopian-science-fictions-legitimising-for-our-current-dystopia-2019-taylor-lecture-oxford-university/

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  2. Bruce Sterling at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    Bruce Sterling at The Interval: The future is a kind of history that hasn’t happened yet. The past is a kind of future that has already happened.

    The present moment vanishes before it can be described. Language, a human invention, lacks the power to fully adhere to reality.

    We live in a very short now and here, since the flow of events in spacetime is mostly closed to human comprehension. But we have to say something about the future, since we have to live there. So what can we say? Being “futuristic” is a problem in metaphysics; it’s about getting language to adhere to an unknowable reality. But the futuristic quickly becomes old-fashioned, so how can the news stay news?

    Bruce Sterling is a futurist, journalist, science-fiction author, and culture critic. He is the author of more than 20 books including ground-breaking science ficiton and non-fiction about hackers, design and the future. He was the editor in 01986 of Mirrorshades: The Cyberpunk Anthology (1986) which brought the cyberpunk science fiction sub-genre to a much wider audience. He previous spoke for Long Now about "The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole" in 02004. His Beyond the Beyond blog on Wired.com is now in its 15th year. His most recent book is Pirate Utopia.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02018/oct/16/how-be-futuristic-bruce-sterling

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  3. Abby Smith Rumsey at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    Abby Smith Rumsey at The Interval: Memory is not about the past, it is about the future. Historian and media expert Abby Smith Rumsey explores how digital memory, which cannot be preserved, will shape the future of knowledge and affect our survival. From March 02016.

    Abby Smith Rumsey is a historian who writes about how ideas and information technologies shape perceptions of history, of time, and of personal and cultural identity. She served as director of the Scholarly Communication Institute at the University of Virginia, and worked for more than a decade at the Library of Congress. Her book When We Are No More, How Digital Memory Is Shaping Our Future (02016) looks at how human memory from pre-history to the present has shed light on the grand challenge facing our world—the abundance of information and scarcity of human attention.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02016/mar/29/how-digital-memory-shaping-our-future

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  4. Andrew Carnegie Lecture Series – Brian Eno

    The third annual Andrew Carnegie Lecture at Edinburgh College of Art was delivered by influential musician and producer Brian Eno.

    The celebrated artist discussed his life and career during a public lecture and at the University of Edinburgh’s George Square Lecture Theatre on 10th May 2016.

    Along with his public lecture, the renowned artist also took part in a number of workshops and seminars with students and staff from a variety of programmes at ECA.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0qATeJcL1XQ
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 09 May 2018 14:03:11 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  5. The morality of robots: Genevieve Bell’s predictions for the future of AI - Conversations - ABC Radio

    Genevieve had never imagined a life in technology, until a chance meeting in a bar in Palo Alto.

    A chance meeting in a bar one night led a young Australian academic Genevieve Bell into a job she’d never expected.

    She was hired by software maker, Intel, as their resident anthropologist.

    Her boss asked her to find out how people outside America were using their cell phones.

    This began fourteen years of helping translate how humans use technology back to the software engineers who make the machines in the first place.

    Now Genevieve is back in Australia, in a job which aims to transform how we think about the interconnectedness of the technological world.

    In an era of rising anxiety about Artificial Intelligence, she says many predictions about the AI-driven future are far too apocalyptic.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/conversations/conversations-genevieve-bell/9173822

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  6. Adam Rogers at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    "Proof: The Science of Booze": Wired Magazine editor and author of "Proof: The Science of Booze", Adam Rogers leads us on a tour of the 10,000 year story of alcohol. With deep historical research, expert testimony, and solid science he discusses the accidental discovery of fermentation, an alternative American whiskey history, and his own role in the pre-history of Long Now’s Interval bar. This talk was the first ever in The Interval’s salon talk series; it took place in May of 02014, 2 weeks before The Interval officially opened. From May 02014.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02014/may/27/proof-science-booze

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  7. Neil Gaiman at the Douglas Adams Memorial Lecture 2015

    One of the words that most accurately describes Douglas Adams’ works is "timeless". In his lecture on "Immortality and Douglas Adams", Neil Gaiman will speak about the enduring nature of Adams’ vision and imagination, the impact of the internet and eBooks on storytelling as a whole, and why stories can sometimes outlive us all.

    This is the 13th Douglas Adams Memorial Lecture in the series.

    The Douglas Adams Memorial Lecture is held each year in honour of Save the Rhino founder patron Douglas Adams, who was a dedicated spokesperson for conservation right up until his death in 2001 at the age of 49. You can read more about Douglas and his interest in conservation here:

    http://www.savetherhino.org/about/trustees_and_patrons/douglas_adams

    The lecture is held in aid of two charities, Save the Rhino and the Environmental Investigation Agency. You can help support these causes.

    Donate today:

    Save the Rhino International: http://www.savetherhino.org/

    Environmental Investigation Agency: http://eia-international.org/

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    Original video: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=D8UU-F1Yorg


    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  8. Time Reborn by Lee Smolin

    What is time? Is our perception of time passing an illusion which hides a deeper, timeless reality? Or is it real, indeed, the most real aspect of our experience of the world? Einstein said that "the distinction between past, present, and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion," and many contemporary theorists agree that time emerges from a more fundamental timeless quantum universe. But, in recent cosmological speculation, this timeless picture of nature seems to have reached a dead end, populated by infinite numbers of imagined unobservable universes.

    In his talk, Lee Smolin explains why he changed his mind about the nature of time. Like many fellow theorists, he used to believe time is an illusion, but he now embraces the view that time is real and everything else, including the laws of nature, evolves. Drawing from his new book, Time Reborn, Smolin explains how the great unsolved problems in physics and cosmology may be solved by adopting the view of a real time. then he will go beyond physics to explain how our view of time affects how we think of everything from our personal and family lives to how we face major problems such as climate change and economic crisis. In a world in which time is real, the future is open and there is an essential role for human agency and imagination in envisioning and shaping a good future.

    http://www.perimeterinstitute.ca/videos/time-reborn

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