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Tagged with “language” (179)

  1. 32 WORDS FOR FIELD: Manchán Magan - Ireland’s Edge | Acast

    Writer and broadcaster Manchán Magan encountered the remarkable richness of the Irish language as a young child, and his grandmother Sighle was determined that he would learn to speak it in the place where it was the common language of daily life. This was Muiríoch in the west Kerry Gaeltacht, where Manchán spent his childhood holidays in his grandmother’s house. The Irish he learned there dates back to a time when the multiplicity of words for objects, actions, ideas and feelings reflected a way of life with a profound appreciation for the natural world.

    In Dingle Manchán spoke with Ireland’s Edge founder Nuala O’Connor about his new book, 32 Words for Field: Lost Words of the Irish Landscape.

    https://shows.acast.com/irelands-edge/episodes/32-words-for-field-manchan-mcgann

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  2. Science(ish): Arrival

    The boys start the new series with a bang. And a new format. One question, one scientist, plenty of relatively well-informed chat. To kick off, Rick and Michael go extra-terrestrial with 2016’s linguistic thriller ‘Arrival’. We’re talking a hundred words for snow, we’re talking babies on an island, and we’re talking (not so) Universal Grammar.

    Featuring: Dr Jessica Coon

    https://www.radiowolfgang.com/s/scienceish/arrival

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  3. Science Movie Club: ‘Arrival’

    The 2016 movie ‘Arrival,’ an adaptation of Ted Chiang’s novella ‘Story of Your Life,’ captured the imaginations of science fiction fans worldwide. Field linguist Jessica Coon, who consulted on the film, breaks down what the movie gets right — and wrong — about linguistics.

    https://www.npr.org/2020/08/12/901705799/science-movie-club-arrival

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  4. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Language and the Mind

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the history of our ideas about the formation of language. The psychologist George Miller worked out that in English there are potentially a hundred million trillion sentences of twenty words in length - that’s a hundred times the number of seconds since the birth of the universe. “Language”, as Chomsky put it, “makes infinite use of finite media”. “Language”, as Steven Pinker puts it, “comes so naturally to us that it’s easy to forget what a strange and miraculous gift it is”. “All over the world”, he writes, “members of our species spend a good part of their lives fashioning their breath into hisses and hums and squeaks and pops and are listening to others do the same”. Jean Jacques Rousseau once said that we differ from the animal kingdom in two main ways - the use of language and the prohibition of incest. Language and our ability to learn it has been held up traditionally as our species’ most remarkable achievement, marking us apart from the animals. But in the 20th century, our ideas about how language is formed are being radically challenged and altered. With Dr Jonathan Miller, medical doctor, performer, broadcaster, author and film and opera director; Steven Pinker, cognitive scientist, Professor of Psychology and Director of the Centre for Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, California.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00545cr

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  5. Radiolab: The Wubi Effect

    When we think of China today, we think of a technological superpower. From Huawei and 5G to TikTok and viral social media, China is stride for stride with the United States in the world of computing. However, China’s technological renaissance almost didn’t happen. And for one very basic reason: The Chinese language, with its 70,000 plus characters, couldn’t fit on a keyboard.

    Today, we tell the story of Professor Wang Yongmin, a hard headed computer programmer who solved this puzzle and laid the foundation for the China we know today.

    https://www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/radiolab/articles/wubi-effect

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