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Tagged with “james bridle” (21)

  1. Marcus du Sautoy and James Bridle – books podcast

    On this week’s show, we’re exploring infinity and beyond with artist and writer James Bridle and mathematician Marcus du Sautoy.

    Through his visual art and writings on technology and culture, James Bridle has been at the forefront of our understanding of tech for the last decade – and from his perspective, the view of our future is both exciting and gloomy. He sat down with the Guardian’s technology reporter Alex Hern to talk about his book, New Dark Age.

    Limits are grist to the mill for Marcus du Sautoy, professor of public understanding of science at Oxford University. His mission is to explore – and if possible, explain – the unknown, so following hot on the heels of his bestselling book What We Cannot Know, is How to Count to Infinity. Meeting with Richard Lea at the Hay festival, Du Sautoy explained how a German mathematician first proved the existence of infinity in 1874, and what the concept means for our understanding of the universe.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. James Bridle: The nightmare videos of children’s YouTube — and what’s wrong with the internet today | TED Talk

    Writer and artist James Bridle uncovers a dark, strange corner of the internet, where unknown people or groups on YouTube hack the brains of young children in return for advertising revenue. From "surprise egg" reveals and the "Finger Family Song" to algorithmically created mashups of familiar cartoon characters in violent situations, these videos exploit and terrify young minds — and they tell us something about where our increasingly data-driven world is headed. "We need to stop thinking about technology as a solution to all of our problems, but think of it as a guide to what those problems actually are, so we can start thinking about them properly and start to address them," Bridle says.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/james_bridle_the_nightmare_videos_of_childrens_youtube_and_what_s_wrong_with_the_internet_today

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Algorisky

    From Google search to Facebook news, algorithms shape our online experience. But like us, algorithms are flawed. Programmers write cultural biases into code, whether they realize it or not. Author Luke Dormehl explores the impact of algorithms, on and offline. Staci Burns and James Bridle investigate the human cost when YouTube recommendations are abused. Anthropologist Nick Seaver talks about the danger of automating the status quo. Safiya Noble looks at preventing racial bias from seeping into code. And Allegheny County’s Department of Children and Family Services shows us how a well-built algorithm can help save lives.

    https://irlpodcast.org/episode12/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. re:publica 2015 - James Bridle: Living in the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    Find out more at: http://re-publica.de/session/living-electromagnetic-spectrum

    Artist and writer James Bridle explores how politics is manifested in technology, and how the the things we build shape the world in unexpected ways. In particular, he will detail the ways in which networks and communications affect notions of citizenship in the 21st Century, as explored in his recent art works and writings.

    James Bridle http://booktwo.org/

    Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Germany (CC BY-SA 3.0 DE)

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LM2V5wOxSY
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  5. James Bridle – On the Rainbow Plane

    For his residency at the White Building, James Bridle will be investigating the relationships between the public understanding of technology and networks, and the classification of people and things performed by technologies. He will explore the embedded politics, from the technological gaze to data shadows, immigration, deportation, and rendition. James’ lecture will illustrate and discuss the issues which underlie this work, together with new works undertaken as part of the residency.

    Audio rip, original here: http://vimeo.com/88327472

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Gin & Innovation 005 — James Bridle

    In which George talks about copper in Zambia and China, and James Bridle drops by to talk about museums, party balloons, surveillance, and his experiences flying a blimp (‘kite’) over London. Intro and outro music courtesy, as ever, of Chris Arkenberg.

    Links and works referenced:

    Coralie Gourguechon

    Undercurrent (BDF)

    ‘Mining Copper in Zambia’ (Fast Company)

    ‘China’s giant pile of copper is inflating its credit bubble’ (Quartz)

    ‘Why a collapse in copper prices is a worrying sign for China’s financial system’ (Quartz)

    ‘Americans and Chinese are buying houses so you should buy copper’ (Quartz)

    ‘Chinese mining firms in Zambia under fire for mistreating workers’ (Guardian)

    ‘FTSE4Good Index Series: measuring environmental and social standards’ (Guardian)

    Mollas-Gallart, J. 1997. ‘Which way to go? Defence technology and the diversity of ‘dual-use’ technology transfer’, Research Policy 26 (3): 367-385.

    Grätz, T. 2003. ‘Gold-mining and risk management: A case study from Northern Benin’, Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology 68 (2): 192-208. [Benin rather than Zambia, and gold rather than copper; whoops.]

    Rapid Response Collecting (V&A)

    ‘Rapid Response Collecting at the V&A’ (Icon review)

    ‘3D-printed guns: easy to print, a nightmare to import’ (Wired.co.uk)

    ‘Why all the fuss over the V&A’s 3D-printed gun? It’s a symbol - not a threat’ (Independent)

    Digital Revolution (Barbican)

    Talk to Me (MoMA)

    ‘@ in Context: Criteria for an Acquisition’ (MoMA)

    Right to Flight

    ‘The right to flight: why I’m flying a balloon over London this summer’ (Guardian)

    Article 36

    Fuzz testing

    http://ginandinnovation.libsyn.com/gin-innovation-005-james-bridle

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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