adactio / tags / irish

Tagged with “irish” (59)

  1. The Music Keepers: Traditional Irish Music in North America - Brendan Tonra

    Interview with composer and musician Brendan Tonra at his home in Boston, Feb 2009.

    Part of a 12 part series on traditional Irish musicians in North America. Funded by the Sound and Vision Scheme - Broadcasting Commission of Ireland - Connemara Community Radio

    Sound by Grainne O’Malley Research - Patrick Ourceau Produced by Ita Kane-Wilson

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/ita-kane-wilson/the-music-keepers-brendan
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. “The Boys of the Lough” - Studio 360

    Michael Coleman’s recordings from the early 1920’s set the standard for all the traditional Irish music that would follow. Coleman emigrated from County Sligo, Ireland, to New York City in 1914 at the age of 23. In New York, recording companies were eager to sell records to immigrants nostalgic for the music of home. Coleman became one of the first Irish musicians to be immortalized on the shellac of a 78 rpm record.

    Coleman played a style of fiddle music particular to county Sligo. “The Sligo style is upbeat, it’s very rhythmic, uses a lot of ornamentation,” says Brian Conway, a musician from New York who plays Sligo-style fiddle.

    It was a tradition passed down from mentor to student, not on paper. “The music is not played as it’s written on sheet music,” says Fiona Ritchie, producer of the public radio show The Thistle and Shamrock. “When you had no way of recording it, the only way to memorialize it was to put it on sheet music, and then it loses that sense of rhythm that can only be captured by hearing it.”

    So when Coleman recorded the song “The Boys of the Lough,” he was crystallizing a tradition. “This was really a turning point for Irish music, because music could travel out from the communities where it had just been a natural, unremarkable part of life,” Ritchie says.

    Ritchie credits recordings by Coleman and other Irish emigrants with saving traditional Celtic music. “Once you partnered up these early recordings with radio, you had the music coming back to its home again and reinvigorating the music,” she says. “So many of these communities had been depleted, with young folks going away and taking their music with them.”

    Coleman was prodigiously talented, and thanks to those early recordings, his influence hasn’t waned. “Michael Coleman’s influence on traditional Irish music could be compared to Miles Davis in jazz, the Beatles in rock ‘n roll,” Conway says. “His influence is still felt today by those who may never have actually listened to Coleman play, but just through what they’ve learned from other people.”

    http://www.studio360.org/story/the-boys-of-the-lough/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. A Conversation with Irish Step Dancer Kevin Doyle

    Traditional or folk artists do their art whatever it is—quilting, singing, or dancing from pure love.

    Often working full-time jobs and raising families, they still find the time to pursue their craft.

    This is the case for Irish step dancer Kevin Doyle, the one-time grocery store manager and bus driver is also one of the best traditional step dancers in the Northeast.

    This year, he’s been named a 2014 National Heritage Fellow by the National Endowment for the Arts.

    Here’s his remarkable story.

    http://www.prx.org/pieces/129475

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. A Conversation with Irish Fiddler Seamus Connolly

    Seamus Connolly is a teacher, scholar, and, as you heard, a remarkable irish fiddler. By his mid-twenties, Connolly had won the Irish National Fiddle Championship ten times, a feat that is still unequalled. Since emigrating to the United States in the 1970s, Seamus has performed at numerous festivals throughout the country, including the National Folk Festival, Smithsonian Folklife Festival, and with three of phenomenonally successful Masters of the Folk Violin tours organized by the National Council for the Traditional Arts.

    Connolly’s recordings including his two solo CDs, Notes from my Mind and Here and There, as well as The Boston Edge with 2004 NEA National Heritage Fellow Joe Derrane and John McGann. Since 2004, Connolly has been the Sullivan Artist in Residence at Boston College’s Center for Irish Programs where he had previously directed the highly acclaimed Gaelic Roots Summer School and Festival. Not surprisingly he is the recipient of many awards—and , he’s added a national heritage fellowship—which is a lifetime honor presented to master folk and traditional artists by the national endowment for the arts.

    I traveled to Maine to visit with Seamus when he was awarded the heritage fellowship. I began by asking Seamus to explain what makes Irish fiddling, Irish Fiddling?

    https://beta.prx.org/stories/122663

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. The Gloaming - The Music Show

    The Gloaming is Martin Hayes, fiddle, Iarla Ó Lionáird, vocal, Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh, hardanger fiddle, Dennis Cahill, guitar and Thomas Bartlett, piano.

    Live performances in The Music Show studio:

    • Song 44: Trad arr. The Gloaming
    • Sailors Bonnet Trad arr. The Gloaming

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/musicshow/the-gloaming/5840218

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Altan Live at the Port Fairy Folk Festival - The Live Set

    Iconic Irish folk group Altan has been bringing Donegal’s rich collection of Irish Gaelic language songs and instrumental styles to audiences around the world for more than 25 years.

    Hear highlights of their recent performance at the Port Fairy Folk Festival in this week’s show.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/liveset/altan-pfff/5467978

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Lúnasa live at Port Fairy - The Live Set

    Traditional Irish ensemble Lúnasa has been touring and performing for nearly 20 years, and they’re showing no signs of slowing down any time soon.

    Their namesake is an old Gaelic festival called Lughnasadh, which marks the beginning of the August harvest season, and there’s a certain festive note in their ardent and lyrical tunes, along with a casual finesse.

    Hear Lúnasa’s fine set recorded at the Port Fairy Folk Festival by RN’s live music team, on this week’s Live Set.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/liveset/lunasa-live-at-port-fairy/5701496

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. This Music Has No Borders: Scots-Irish Music In Appalachia | Here & Now

    The Scots who left their homeland and came to the United States by way of Ulster, carried with them their belongings. They also brought something that didn’t need a suitcase: their traditional music.

    A beautiful new books charts the movement of this music from Europe to Appalachia. It’s a movement of songs and generations.

    The book is “Wayfaring Strangers,”  authored by Fiona Ritchie – host of NPR’s “The Thistle and Shamrock,” which features traditional and contemporary Celtic music — and Doug Orr, president emeritus of Warren Wilson College.

    The book comes with a CD of songs sung by artists including Pete Seeger, Doc Watson and Dolly Parton.

    Ritchie only half-jokingly says Scottish songs are characterized by their melancholy.

    “Scots do like to sing of broken hearts and sad songs of parting and of unrequited love, lost love, death, but also it has that sort of soul to it that comes from Scottish music and Irish music and Appalachian,” Ritchie told Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

    The movement of peoples around the world goes on to this day, and we need to remind ourselves that they bring with them their stories, their homesickness for the old place.– Doug Orr

    Ritchie says Woody Guthrie, the American folk legend, was inspired by the Scottish poet Robert Burns, who traveled around Scotland collecting songs.

    “Woody Guthrie really was of that same spirit,” Ritchie said. “He traveled around as a sort of troubador, tuning into traditions of the people he encountered. And most notably Bob Dylan, who reached back, having been inspired by Woody Guthrie — who in turn was inspired by Burns — Dylan reaches back to the Burnsian approach of picking up bits and pieces of ballads — even just ideas, little bits of tunes — and re-purposes them, recreates new songs for a new generation.”

    Orr says the story of the Scottish immigrants is still being played out, by different people in different parts of the world.

    “It’s a universal story in many ways,” Orr said. “The immigration, the movement of peoples around the world, goes on to this day, and we need to remind ourselves that they bring with them their stories, their homesickness for the old place. It’s a very human story.”

    Music from the Segment

    “Barbara Allen” performed by Dolly Parton and Altan

    “The Winding River Roe” performed by Cara Dillon

    “The Farmer’s Curst Wife” performed by Pete Seeger

    “Shady Grove performed”by Doc Watson and David Holt

    Also, “It Was a’ for Our Rightfu’ King” performed by Dougie MacLean and

    “Benton’s Jig/Benton’s Dream” performed by Patrick Street

    “Pretty Saro” performed by Bob Dylan

    Guests

    Fiona Ricthie and Doug Orr, co-authors of “Wayfaring Strangers: The Musical Voyage From Scotland And Ulster To Appalachia.” Fiona Ritchie hosts NPR’s “The Thistle And Shamrock.” Doug Orr is president emeritus of Warren Wilson College and the founder of the Sawannanoa Gathering music workshop. Fiona tweets @fiona_ritchie.

    http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2014/10/01/wayfaring-strangers-book

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Donal Lunny and Paddy Glackin

    Donal Lunny Paddy Glackin live from the Solidarity with Japan Session.

    http://www.livetrad.com/podcast/?p=episode&name=2011-06-30_donal_lunny_paddy_glackin.mp3

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. RT.ie Radio 1: Documentary on One - The Balloon in Brosna

    Sunday 24th May 2009, 7pm

    Con was born in Brosna, Co Kerry in 1925. Every year the village of Brosna holds a festival in his honour.

    Con’s life story has a Rabelaisian quality to it. Apprenticed as a blacksmith - a trade with no future he points out - he left for the promise of London at an early age. There he worked as a ganger for Murphy for ten years, tunnelling beneath the streets of the city, before becoming a publican.

    His 14-year tenancy of The Balloon in Chelsea passed into London folklore. The Balloon was renowned as a place that rarely closed for business - pushed by a policeman on one occasion Curtin defined his opening hours as from January until December.

    He played music on the Topic album, Paddy in the Smoke, recorded in London in the 1960s and regarded by many as the finest live recording of traditional music ever made.

    Musically Curtin is defined by Sliabh Luchra and by his time in London. Brosna is - for him - the place that music comes from and his life has been defined by that music and the people he met through it. Con Curtin was one of the last of his kind: a natural storyteller.

    Con passed away in April 2009.

    Producers: Peter Woods and Liam O’Brien.

    (First broadcast July 2005)

    An Irish radio documentary from RT Radio 1, Ireland - Documentary on One - the home of Irish radio documentaries

    http://www.rte.ie/radio1/doconone/the_balloon_in_brosna2.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

Page 2 of 6Newer Older