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Tagged with “ireland” (27)

  1. “JUST A BANJO PLAYER”: Rhiannon Giddens - Ireland’s Edge | Acast

    Once referred to as a ‘performing historian’ Rhiannon Giddens is a musician from Greensboro, North Carolina whose career has ranged from folk to country, blues to gospel, opera to R&B. Her old-time string band, the Carolina Chocolate Drops have received 6 Grammy nominations, winning in 2010 for their album Genuine Negro Jig.

    In 2017 Rhiannon received a MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant for ‘reclaiming African American contributions to folk and country music and bringing to light new connections between music from the past and the present’.

    At Ireland’s Edge, she speaks to music journalist Jim Carroll about race, influence and appropriation of African-American music, and cross-cultural collaboration all through the story of the banjo in the United States.

    https://shows.acast.com/irelands-edge/episodes/just-a-banjo-player-rhiannon-giddens

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  2. 32 WORDS FOR FIELD: Manchán Magan - Ireland’s Edge | Acast

    Writer and broadcaster Manchán Magan encountered the remarkable richness of the Irish language as a young child, and his grandmother Sighle was determined that he would learn to speak it in the place where it was the common language of daily life. This was Muiríoch in the west Kerry Gaeltacht, where Manchán spent his childhood holidays in his grandmother’s house. The Irish he learned there dates back to a time when the multiplicity of words for objects, actions, ideas and feelings reflected a way of life with a profound appreciation for the natural world.

    In Dingle Manchán spoke with Ireland’s Edge founder Nuala O’Connor about his new book, 32 Words for Field: Lost Words of the Irish Landscape.

    https://shows.acast.com/irelands-edge/episodes/32-words-for-field-manchan-mcgann

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  3. The Great Irish Famine

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss why the potato crop failures in the 1840s had such a catastrophic impact in Ireland. It is estimated that one million people died from disease or starvation after the blight and another two million left the country within the decade. There had been famines before, but not on this scale. What was it about the laws, attitudes and responses that made this one so devastating?

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0003rj1

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  4. Driving Bill Drummond Seriously…

    Bill Drummond is driving to every county in Ireland in five days. But what’s driving Bill?

    Bill Drummond is many things. As well as an artist, a writer and former pop-star - he’s the owner of an old curfew tower in Northern Ireland which he runs as an artists’ residency. Last year some poets from Belfast’s Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry stayed there and Bill published their collected work in a little black book called The Curfew Tower is Many Things.

    Except for a poem the award-winning Belfast poet Stephen Sexton wrote. Apparently that one went missing. So Bill has left two pages blank in the book for Stephen to fill in with poetry as they drive through all of Ireland’s 32 counties in 5 days in a white Ford Transit hire-van, giving out copies as they go.

    But what exactly is driving Bill Drummond?

    Producer Conor Garrett is there to find out. As they cross the Irish border and over each county boundary, Conor is becoming increasingly concerned he may not have a good enough story for his radio programme. It’s a problem further complicated by the fact Bill won’t talk about his chart-topping ’90s pop band who once famously set fire to a very large pile of their own cash. Then, when a narrative arc does eventually develop, Conor can’t be sure how authentic it is. And what’s all this stuff about eels?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05cpm29

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. How the Irish created the great wines of Bordeaux (and elsewhere)

    I confess, quaffing a Lynch-Bages or a snifter of Hennessy, I have wondered how it is that such fine upstanding Irish names come to be associated with cognac and claret. There my wonderings ended, until a recent visit to Ireland, where, in Cork and Kinsale, I found answers. Starting in the 17th century an intrepid band of Irish emigrants set out first for France, then the rest of Europe, and ultimately almost anywhere wines are made. And almost everywhere they went, the Irish diaspora had an impact on wine-making that belies the idea that the Irish know only about beers.

    The story is a complex one, built on tarriff wars, free trade and political union, with a touch of religious persecution thrown in for good measure.

    Sound familiar?

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/how-the-irish-created-the-great-wines-of-bordeaux-and-elsewhere/

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  6. A brief history of Irish butter

    Podcast: Play in new window | Download The Butter Museum in Cork, Ireland, features on some lists of the world’s quirky etc. food museums but not others. It ought to be on all of them. This is a seriously interesting museum for anyone who likes butter, and in my book, that means just about everyone. (I refuse absolutely to say anything about the impact – if any – of butter on health, not least because there’s nothing certain one can say.) It sits next to the grand Butter Exchange, built when the Cork Butter Market sat like a colossus astride the global market. The Irish butter traded through Cork was done in by refrigeration, fell to the lowest level possible, and then emerged again after Ireland joined the European Union, by returning to the principles that made the Cork Butter Exchange great. The Butter Museum tells the whole story. This episode tells a bit of it.

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/a-brief-history-of-irish-butter/

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  7. RT.ie Radio 1: Documentary on One - The Calligraphers’ Song

    A radio documentary about different ways of seeing the Book of Kells.

    ‘The Calligraphers’ Song’ was first broadcast on 15th April 2002.

    Produced by Lorelei Harris.

    An Irish radio documentary from RT Radio 1, Ireland - Documentary on One - the home of Irish radio documentaries.

    http://www.rte.ie/radio1/doconone/radio-documentary-calligraphers-song.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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