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Tagged with “internet” (167)

  1. Track Changes: The Web Is Dead

    This week Paul and Rich eulogize the web, which has been dying since its inception. They compare the early, organicmdays of the web with today’s trends towards massive commercial centralization. They also talk about Outbrain and Taboola (“20 slides spread over 400 pages”), Disqus and Facebook comment threads, and the hellscape that is wish.com, leading Rich to declare, “Maybe the web sucks! Maybe it should die!”

    http://trackchanges.libsyn.com/the-web-is-dead

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. 1999: The Years That Changed The Internet

    To close out our 3 part series, we go back to 1999 and talk to the internet’s greatest monster: the man who invented Microsoft’s Clippy (jk he’s a really nice guy named Kevan Atteberry). We hear from the folks of Open Diary, one of the first social media/blogging sites and talk to Olia Lialina, who has been preserving and archiving Geocities sites. Katie and Ryan force Julia to read some erotic Clippy fanfic, but we need not speak of that.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/iexplorer/1999-the-years-that-changed
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Chapter 7, Part 4 – eBay Wins the Auction Wars | Internet History Podcast

    Part 2 of eBay’s founding story. How, why and when eBay became the undisputed king of the online auction space.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2015/09/ebay-wins-the-auction-wars/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Chapter 7, Part 3 – The Founding of eBay | Internet History Podcast

    Or, to be more strictly accurate, this episode covers the founding of AuctionWeb, the site that would become eBay. How Pierre Omidyar founded a company that brought auctions to the web and revolutionized what classified ads and ecommerce could be.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2015/05/the-founding-of-ebay/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Chapter 7, Part 2 – Amazon’s Dominance of eCommerce | Internet History Podcast

    It’s part two of our Amazon founding story. How did Amazon come to completely dominate e-commerce? How did Jeff Bezos’ “Get Big Fast” strategy evolve? How and why did Amazon become the quintessential “dot com” and dot-com-era stock? The answers are within. :)

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2015/04/amazons-dominance-of-ecommerce/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Chapter 7, Part 1 – E-Commerce And the Birth of Amazon.com | Internet History Podcast

    Finally, the long-promised foray into e-commerce, starting with… not the first… but practically the first… player in the space… and ironically enough, the 800 pound gorilla in the space to this day. Amazon. Dot com. We examine Jeff Bezos, the man. We consider Amazon, the idea. We look at e-commerce, the concept. It’s interesting. It’s groundbreaking. It’s available with free 2-day shipping for Prime members. Just kidding.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2015/02/how-did-amazon-get-started/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Chapter 6 – A History of Internet Porn | Internet History Podcast

    It’s commonly accepted that with any new medium or technological advance, sex and pornographic material can often be the catalyst that drives early adoption. Among the first things produced after the invention of the printing press were of course bibles; but along side the bibles there was ribald and bawdy poetry and stories. When photography was developed in the 18th century, photographic commerce was mostly about selling people portraits of themselves or their loved ones—at least, initially. What really kicked off an industry for photographs was the marketing of pictures of other people… in the nude. These pictures were largely marketed as artistic model studies for aspiring artists, but that does little to explain why they sold in the tens of millions. The Crimean war in the 1850s and the American Civil war in the 1860s really lit a fuse under this industry. Soldiers on the front lines carried pictures of their sweetheart in their pockets, but also pictures of these “model studies.”

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2015/01/history-of-internet-porn/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Chapter 5, Part 2 – Wired, CNet, Salon, Slate and Suck – More Early Web Media | Internet History Podcast

    We continue our survey of early web media plays with some that have lasted the test of time and some that, while not currently extant, were lasting in terms of impact. It’s a big episode. WSJ.com. NYTimes.com. EOnline. The Weather Channel. ZDNet. CNet. Salon. Slate. Wired magazine and HotWired.com. And our long lost, beloved Suck.com.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2014/09/wired-cnet-salon-slate-and-suck-more-early-web-media/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Chapter 5, Part 1 – Mercury Center and Pathfinder – Big Media’s Big Web Adventure | Internet History Podcast

    We’ve been looking at how companies were feeling their way into the internet era, trying to create new industries and new mediums without precedent or a road map. But thus far, we’ve mainly been looking at pure-play tech companies. And when the web revolution came, everyone wanted a piece of it, not just the tech world. So, this episode looks at the creative and business efforts of those people companies who came from outside the traditional environs of Silicon Valley.

    We’re largely going to look at big media. When the web began, it was considered to be a new medium, and so it was assumed by many if not most people that big media would logically dominate this new medium. The reason this did not come to pass is complicated, and we’ll look at some of the many reasons why. We’ll look at pioneering newspaper efforts like the San Jose Mercury News’ Mercury Center. We’ll examine unlikely big media web properties that got the web exactly right, like the Weather Channel. We’ll look at how one unlikely company, Reuters, singlehandedly disrupted the entire content industry by turning news into an online commodity. And more than anything, we’ll look at the rise and ignominious fall, of Pathfinder, onetime rival of sites like Yahoo, the portal that maybe wasn’t a portal, the greatest website you don’t remember.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2014/07/mercury-center-and-pathfinder-big-medias-big-web-adventure/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. The “Book Club” Episode | Internet History Podcast

    Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet, by Katie Hafner The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution, by Walter Isaacson The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires, by Tim Wu Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web, by Tim Berners-Lee How the Web Was Born: The Story of the World Wide Web, by James Gillies and Robert Cailliau AOL.com, by Kara Swisher The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon, by Brad Stone The Perfect Store: Inside eBay, by Adam Cohen Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader, by Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli Infinite Loop, How Apple, the World’s Most Insanely Great Company, Went Insane, by Michael S. Malone Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future, by Ashlee Vance

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2015/05/the-book-club-episode/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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