adactio / tags / internet

Tagged with “internet” (220)

  1. The Lost Cities of Geo - 99% Invisible

    The first time that David Bohnett heard about the internet, he knew that this was going to be a technology that was about to change the world. Today, David is a philanthropist and tech entrepreneur, but back in the early 1990s he really wanted to get on the ground floor of this brand new medium.

    https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/the-lost-cities-of-geo/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Inventor of the Hashtag, Chris Messina | Internet History Podcast

    Well, as we say in this episode, he’ll always be known as the inventor of the hashtag, but Chris Messina has been central to so many things in tech over the last 20 years or so. Helped Mozilla launch Firefox. Founded BarCamp where so much Web 2.0 goodness happened and was launched. Cofounded the first co-working space in San Francisco. Helped Google try to grok social with Google+. Oh, and that hashtag business.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2019/06/inventor-of-the-hashtag-chris-messina/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Carole Cadwalladr: Facebook’s role in Brexit — and the threat to democracy | TED Talk

    In an unmissable talk, journalist Carole Cadwalladr digs into one of the most perplexing events in recent times: the UK’s super-close 2016 vote to leave the European Union. Tracking the result to a barrage of misleading Facebook ads targeted at vulnerable Brexit swing voters — and linking the same players and tactics to the 2016 US presidential election — Cadwalladr calls out the "gods of Silicon Valley" for being on the wrong side of history and asks: Are free and fair elections a thing of the past?

    https://www.ted.com/talks/carole_cadwalladr_facebook_s_role_in_brexit_and_the_threat_to_democracy

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Video and audio from my closing keynote at Friday’s Grand Re-Opening of the Public Domain / Boing Boing

    On Friday, hundreds of us gathered at the Internet Archive, at the invitation of Creative Commons, to celebrate the Grand Re-Opening of the Public Domain, just weeks after the first works entered the American public domain in twenty years.

    I had the honor of delivering the closing keynote, after a roster of astounding speakers. It was a big challenge and I was pretty nervous, but on reviewing the saved livestream, I’m pretty proud of how it turned out.

    Proud enough that I’ve ripped the audio and posted it to my podcast feed; the video for the keynote is on the Archive and mirrored to Youtube.

    The whole event’s livestream is also online, and boy do I recommend it.

    https://boingboing.net/2019/01/27/locke-as-thinkfluencer.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Babbage: Pioneers of the WWW | Babbage from Economist Radio on acast

    Kenneth Cukier gets in the Babbage time machine and travels to 1989, when Sir Tim Berners-Lee wrote the famous memo that laid the foundations for the world wide web. Kenn speaks to some of the other key figures that influenced its invention, like Ted Nelson and Vint Cerf, and then asks what the WWW might look like in the future.

    https://play.acast.com/s/theeconomistbabbage/babbage-pioneersofthewww

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. What if women built the internet?

    All the things we love on the internet — from websites that give us information to services that connect us — are made stronger when their creators come with different points of view. With this in mind, we asked ourselves and our guests: “What would the internet look like if it was built by mostly women?”

    Witchsy founders Kate Dwyer and Penelope Gazin start us off with a story about the stunt they had to pull to get their site launched — and counter the sexist attitudes they fought against along the way. Brenda Darden Wilkerson recalls her life in tech in the 80s and 90s, and shares her experience leading AnitaB.org, an organization striving to get more women hired in tech. Coraline Ada Ehmke created the Contributor Covenant, a voluntary code of conduct being increasingly adopted by the open source community. She explains why she felt it necessary, and how it’s been received; and Mighty Networks CEO Gina Bianchini rolls her eyes at being called a “lady CEO,” and tells us why diversifying the boardroom is great for business and innovation.

    https://irlpodcast.org/season4/episode7/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

Page 1 of 22Older