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Tagged with “interaction” (19)

  1. CHI 2014 Scott Jensen Keynote: The Physical Web

    Too often when we discuss "interaction" we think of it as a desktop vs tablet vs mobile issue. However, with the plummeting cost of both processing and connectivity, our understanding of a ‘smart device’ is rapidly changing. The challenge is that this new, amazing category of devices will blind side us, requiring entirely new ways of interacting. This talk will discuss the exploding new area of smart devices, how the Internet of things is a UX disaster, and how we are on the verge of an entirely new way of interacting with devices.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2X_ktouD6YM
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Of Mice And Men | 99% Invisible

    If you are looking at a computer screen, your right hand is probably resting on a mouse.  To the left of that mouse (or above, if you’re on a laptop) is your keyboard. As you work on the computer, your right hand moves back and forth from keyboard to mouse. You can’t do everything you need to do on a computer without constantly moving between input devices.

    There is another way.

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/of-mice-and-men/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Dan Saffer – Big Considerations from Microinteractions » UIE Brain Sparks

    User Experience is really all about delighting your users. You want them to accomplish tasks with ease and not encounter any roadblocks that are a direct result of your design. Many of the delightful things about an app or interface go unnoticed because they are the tiniest of features. These microinteractions can set the tone for your users and dictate the feel and performance of your design.

    Dan Saffer is an expert on microinteractions. In fact, he wrote the book on it. He says that microinteractions essentially operate based on triggers, rules, feedback, loops, and modes. For example, when you engage a scrollbar, how fast does it scroll? Or when you click a volume up button, what percent increase is each click?

    Just think of a car. In the broadest terms, a car is a car. But the styling of the interior, leather seats, placement of cupholders, and how the in car stereo system works all help differentiate one car from another. These are often subtle differences, but as with microinteractions, these small differences are crucial to the overall feel and experience.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2014/08/01/dan-saffer-big-considerations-from-microinteractions/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Mundane Computing with Josh Clark | The Breaking Development Podcast

    Fresh Squeezed Mobile is Breaking Development’s channel to get fresh ideas out there about mobile web development and design.

    This week Jim talks to Josh Clark where we discuss designing for devices that don’t have a rectangular slab of glass for touch interaction, un-social devices, and Internet connected refrigerators and so much more.

    http://fsm.bdconf.com/podcast/mundane-computing-with-josh-clark

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. The Quest for Emotional Engagement: Information Visualization | Johnny Holland

    Today on Radio Johnny Jeff Parks talks with Stephen Anderson, about his workshop at the 10th anniversary of UX Week hosted by Adaptive Path. Stephen shares how design patterns such as spreadsheets, lists, dashboards and grid views suffice for getting data onto a screen. However, when it comes to making sense of this data, these same patterns hold us back from designing great experiences! Generic patterns are poor substitutes for a good custom visualization, especially one designed for the content being displayed.

    http://johnnyholland.org/radio-johnny/the-quest-for-emotional-engagement-information-visualization/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction with Nathan Shedroff & Chris Noessel » UIE Brain Sparks

    Science fiction films often take liberties with the technology that they display. After all, it is fiction. Though they can make up essentially whatever they want, technologies still need to be somewhat realistic to the audience. This influences the way that sci-fi technology is presented in film, but in turn, it’s how sci-fi influences technological advances in the real world.

    Nathan Shedroff, Chair of the MBA in Design Strategy Program at California College of the Arts, and Chris Noessel, Managing Director at Cooper, took it upon themselves to study the lessons that can be learned from science fiction. They analyzed a variety of interfaces from all different time periods of film and television. They discovered that when new technologies are developed and released to the market, people already have expectations of how it should work. This is based upon having already seen a similar, fictional technology.

    Of course, there are instances where the technology in film is all but an impossibility, or at least impractical in real life. This changes as gestural and voice recognition technologies become more advanced, but a lot of interfaces in sci-fi are developed simply for the “cool” factor. Even then, looking to these interfaces as a reference point can help focus a design.

    Nathan and Chris join Jared Spool to discuss their Rosenfeld Media book, Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction in this podcast.

    https://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2012/10/24/make-it-so-interaction-design-lessons-from-science-fiction-with-nathan-shedroff-chris-noessel/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. London IA Podcast with Cennydd Bowles

    In the latest London IA Podcast we host a wide-ranging conversation with Cennydd Bowles on moving from user experience design to digital product designer, what it takes to develop visual design skills, freelancing, A List Apart, writing a book, conference speaking and of course that legendary animal of European folklore.

    Hosted by Matthew Solle and Andrew Travers. Produced by Will Myddelton and Matthew Solle.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Why Mobile Apps Must Die

    Mobile apps are on a clear trajectory for failure. It’s just not possible to have an app for every device in my house, every product I own and every store I enter. Much like Yahoos original hierarchy gave way to Google’s search. Applications have to give away to a ‘just in time’ approach to applications.

    This talk will explain how applications must give way to a more universal approach to application distribution, one based on the mobile web and cloud services. The problem of course, is that the mobile web has both hands tied behind its back. Any mobile app today is locked away behind a browser ghetto: in effect, a sub OS inside a larger mobile OS.

    This isn’t just an arbitrary technology debate, a just-in-time approach to application functionality can unleash entirely new sets of application, ones which are impossible with native apps.

    This talk will layout how this problem can be fixed, and what changes need to take place, outside of just HTML5, for it to happen.

    Scott Jenson, Creative Dir, frog design

    As frog’s Creative Director, Scott Jenson was the first member of the User Interface group at Apple in the late 80s, working on System 7, the Apple Human Interface guidelines and the Newton. After that, he was a freelance design consultant for many years, then director of product design for Symbian, and finally managed the mobile UX group at Google. You can follow frog Creative Director Scott Jenson on Twitter @scottjenson.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP12580

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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