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Tagged with “identity” (11)

  1. Nnedi Okorafor: Sci-fi stories that imagine a future Africa | TED Talk

    "My science fiction has different ancestors — African ones," says writer Nnedi Okorafor. In between excerpts from her "Binti" series and her novel "Lagoon," Okorafor discusses the inspiration and roots of her work — and how she opens strange doors through her Afrofuturist writing.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/nnedi_okorafor_sci_fi_stories_that_imagine_a_future_africa

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The danger of a single story | TED Talk

    Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_ngozi_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. YANSS 133 – How politics became our identity – You Are Not So Smart

    Dinner parties used to be where you avoided politics. Now talking about politics at dinner parties is the norm.

    Years ago, we avoided politics because we assumed the people at our table had diverse political identities, and we didn’t want to introduce a topic that might lead to an argument. Today, we assume our guests share a single identity, after all, why else would we have invited them?

    Something has changed in the United States, and for many of us, it’s only at Thanksgiving dinner, a gathering where we don’t get to sort ourselves by political tribe, that we must face people who see the world differently than ourselves.

    https://youarenotsosmart.com/2018/08/04/yanss-133-how-politics-became-our-identity/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Stewart Butterfield on creating Slack, learning from games, and finding your online identity

    If you came by the Vox office, you would find it oddly quiet. That’s not because we don’t like each other, or because we’re not social, or because we don’t have anything to say. It’s because almost all our communication happens silently, digitally, in Slack.

    Slack is Stewart Butterfield’s creation, and it’s the fastest-growing piece on enterprise software in history. But here’s the kicker: he didn’t mean to create it, just like he didn’t mean to create Flickr before it. In both cases, Butterfield was trying to create a new kind of game: immersive, endless, and focused on experiences rather than victories.

    The story of Butterfield’s pivots from the game to Flickr and Slack have become Silicon Valley lore. But in this conversation, we go deep into the part that’s always fascinated me: the game Butterfield wanted to create, the reasons he thinks gaming is so important, and the ways in which his philosophy background informs his current work. We also talk a lot about the nature of status, identity, and communication in online spaces, as Butterfield’s company is now revolutionizing all three.

    This is a deep, interesting, and unusual conversation — we went places I didn’t expect, and I left thinking about topics I’d neve…

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/panoply/stewart-butterfield-on-creating-slack-learning-from-games-and-finding-your-online-identity
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 11 Feb 2017 01:18:20 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Digital Life, Digital Identity - A conversation about the internet, fiction, and the future

    http://concordia.ca/talks

    Can we predict the future of digital technologies? How does the digital shape who we are? Canadian-American author William Gibson, associated with coining the term “cyberspace", and Fenwick McKelvey, Internet Researcher and Concordia Professor (Department of Communication Studies) explore the complex relationship between digital technologies and our identity.

    Fenwick McKelvey, assistant professor - Department of Communications Studies

    William Gibson, novelist

    Erin Anderssen, journalist - The Globe and Mail

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmh29gwEy7Y
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Digital Life, Digital Identity - A conversation about the internet, fiction, and the future

    Can we predict the future of digital technologies? How does the digital shape who we are? Canadian-American author William Gibson, associated with coining the term “cyberspace", and Fenwick McKelvey, Internet Researcher and Concordia Professor (Department of Communication Studies) explore the complex relationship between digital technologies and our identity.

    Fenwick McKelvey, assistant professor - Department of Communications Studies William Gibson, novelist Erin Anderssen, journalist - The Globe and Mail

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmh29gwEy7Y
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. TAL - 509: It Says So Right Here

    Everyone knows you can’t always believe what you read, but sometimes even official documents aren’t a path to the truth. This week we have stories of people whose lives are altered when seemingly boring documents like birth certificates and petitions are used against them. And a family wrestles with a medical record that has a very clear, but complicated diagnosis.

    http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/509/it-says-so-right-here

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. The Problem of Sock Puppets

    On the Media, a US NPR program, examines what happened when Dilbert creator Scott Adams joined Metafilter to defend himself in a forum criticizing him, but did so using a pseudonym. Scott Adams was outed very quickly by members in the forum, but Metafilter also confirmed it was Scott Adams after he refused to admit it himself.

    A great overview explaining the various cultures and community mores that exist across the internet, just as all communities differ from each other. The best overview how complicated social can be in 6 minutes.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. The Why & How of Decentralized Web Identity | SXSW 2011 panel

    The big players in social networking are setting a plodding pace of innovation. New startups, keen to offer useful and exciting new means of communication, have migrated wholesale to platform-based approaches. Constrained by what it means to be boxed into 140 characters or Facebook’s vision of a lifestream, we’re left without a compelling view of what "social" means on the web. It’s time to take back our identities, and with it the web. We’ll discuss examples of how the web is more Awesome when people are a part of it (and not just a layer on top of a few companies’ databases). We’ll talk about what kinds of approaches make sense in this new world (and which don’t), and discuss some successes (and failures) that have happened along the way. Parts of this discussion will be technical; you can’t build the web without some HTML, and we can’t build a social web without getting our hands dirty. However, tech is boring. You can always look up how to do something - knowing why you want to do something is the hard part. We’re going to look beyond the modern gold rush, and talk about ideas that have lasting value for content providers, producers, and consumers, and why you should care.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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