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Tagged with “ideas” (22)

  1. Steven Johnson on the Importance of Play and the Decisions We Make

    Steven Johnson, is the author of eleven books, including such bestsellers as Farsighted, Wonderland, Where Good Ideas Come From, and The Ghost Map. He is also the host of the PBS series How We Got To Now and the podcast American Innovations.

    http://www.aldacommunicationtraining.com/podcast/stephen-johnson-importance-play-decisions-make/

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  2. Bruce Sterling at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    Bruce Sterling at The Interval: The future is a kind of history that hasn’t happened yet. The past is a kind of future that has already happened.

    The present moment vanishes before it can be described. Language, a human invention, lacks the power to fully adhere to reality.

    We live in a very short now and here, since the flow of events in spacetime is mostly closed to human comprehension. But we have to say something about the future, since we have to live there. So what can we say? Being “futuristic” is a problem in metaphysics; it’s about getting language to adhere to an unknowable reality. But the futuristic quickly becomes old-fashioned, so how can the news stay news?

    Bruce Sterling is a futurist, journalist, science-fiction author, and culture critic. He is the author of more than 20 books including ground-breaking science ficiton and non-fiction about hackers, design and the future. He was the editor in 01986 of Mirrorshades: The Cyberpunk Anthology (1986) which brought the cyberpunk science fiction sub-genre to a much wider audience. He previous spoke for Long Now about "The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole" in 02004. His Beyond the Beyond blog on Wired.com is now in its 15th year. His most recent book is Pirate Utopia.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02018/oct/16/how-be-futuristic-bruce-sterling

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  3. Abby Smith Rumsey at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    Abby Smith Rumsey at The Interval: Memory is not about the past, it is about the future. Historian and media expert Abby Smith Rumsey explores how digital memory, which cannot be preserved, will shape the future of knowledge and affect our survival. From March 02016.

    Abby Smith Rumsey is a historian who writes about how ideas and information technologies shape perceptions of history, of time, and of personal and cultural identity. She served as director of the Scholarly Communication Institute at the University of Virginia, and worked for more than a decade at the Library of Congress. Her book When We Are No More, How Digital Memory Is Shaping Our Future (02016) looks at how human memory from pre-history to the present has shed light on the grand challenge facing our world—the abundance of information and scarcity of human attention.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02016/mar/29/how-digital-memory-shaping-our-future

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  4. The mystery of time - Big Ideas - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    More or less everything you know about time is wrong. This is no single time, but every one of you lives within your own time. Time passes at a different speed for each one of you. There is even no ‘now’ that you share with the person next to you. And the past only exists in your mind created by your memories.

    The Order of Time presented at the Royal Institution of Great Britain. 30 April 2018

    https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/the-mystery-of-time/9790674

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  5. Steven Pinker promotes enlightenment values - Big Ideas - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    The idea of progress has animated social reformers since the western enlightenment. With reason, science and individual rights at its core, this philosophy has transformed the western world over the last two hundred years. Harvard Professor Steven Pinker says these ideas are under threat and need to be defended.

    https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enlightenment-now/9930754

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  6. Where did language come from? - Big Ideas - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Human evolution is a million-year story.  Yet language only appeared in the last 100,000 years. Psychologist Michael Corballis believes that language evolution is far older and more complex. He describes the connections between language and thinking and argues that we underestimate the cognitive ability of other animals.

    https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/where-did-language-come-from/10404342

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  7. Adam Rogers at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    "Proof: The Science of Booze": Wired Magazine editor and author of "Proof: The Science of Booze", Adam Rogers leads us on a tour of the 10,000 year story of alcohol. With deep historical research, expert testimony, and solid science he discusses the accidental discovery of fermentation, an alternative American whiskey history, and his own role in the pre-history of Long Now’s Interval bar. This talk was the first ever in The Interval’s salon talk series; it took place in May of 02014, 2 weeks before The Interval officially opened. From May 02014.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02014/may/27/proof-science-booze

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  8. BBC Radio 4 - A History of Ideas, Physicist Tara Shears on Falsification

    Science is based on fact, right? Cold, unchanging, unarguable facts. Perhaps not, says physicist Tara Shears.

    Tara is more inclined to follow the principles of the Anglo-Austrian philosopher, Karl Popper. He believed that human knowledge progresses through ‘falsification’. A theory or idea shouldn’t be described as scientific unless it could, in principle, be proven false.

    Raised in a Vienna in thrall to Marxism and Freudianism, Popper bristled against these ‘sciences’ which could adapt and survive to prevailing political and social conditions. They could not be proven false and so they were not science. The ideas of Einstein, by contrast, could be tested scientifically and might one day be proven false.

    An interesting principle certainly, but potentially demoralising for a scientist who could see her life’s work dissolve in front of her eyes. Tara joins her colleagues at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva to ponder the implications of Popper’s work. She also meets Popper’s former student, John Worrall and string theoretician David Tong.

    This is part of a week of programmes asking how we can know anything at all.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0641bg2

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  9. Space travel

    Enrico Palermo gives detailed insights into how space tourism is evolving and the opportunities it can provide for new science and exploration.

    The era of commercial space travelling is about to begin. As early as by the end of this year, the first spaceships could take tourists into sub-orbital space. But it doesn’t come cheap, as you would expect. A ticket will cost you 250,000 US dollar. On Big Ideas right after the news, Enrico Palermo gives detailed insights into how space tourism is evolving and the opportunities it can provide for new science and exploration.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/space-travel/5717038

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