adactio / tags / history

Tagged with “history” (237)

  1. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Darwin: In Our Time, Darwin: The Voyage of the Beagle

    How Darwin’s work during the Beagle expedition influenced his theories.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00gbf2g

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Hardcore History 59 The Destroyer of Worlds

    What happens if human beings can’t handle the power of their own weaponry? This show examines the dangerous early years of the Nuclear Age and humankind’s efforts to avoid self-destruction at the hands of its own creation.

    http://www.dancarlin.com/hardcore-history-59-the-destroyer-of-worlds/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Adam Rogers at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    "Proof: The Science of Booze": Wired Magazine editor and author of "Proof: The Science of Booze", Adam Rogers leads us on a tour of the 10,000 year story of alcohol. With deep historical research, expert testimony, and solid science he discusses the accidental discovery of fermentation, an alternative American whiskey history, and his own role in the pre-history of Long Now’s Interval bar. This talk was the first ever in The Interval’s salon talk series; it took place in May of 02014, 2 weeks before The Interval officially opened. From May 02014.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02014/may/27/proof-science-booze

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. The “First” Blogger, Justin Hall | Internet History Podcast

    A lot of people give credit to Justin Hall for being, if not the first, then spiritually, at least, the “first” blogger. Since early 1994, first as Justin’s Homepage and at various points, as Justin’s Links from the Underground and Links.net, Justin Hall has been writing online and sharing online—especially, sharing himself online—longer than almost anyone else on the planet. Hear his story today, and watch his documentary at: http://overshare.links.net/

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2017/06/the-first-blog-justin-hall/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. How actress Hedy Lamarr became the ‘mother of Wi-Fi’ | Public Radio International

    During her years as a film star, little was known of Lamarr’s offscreen technological inventions. Now, Hollywood is finally taking notice.

    https://www.pri.org/stories/2017-06-25/how-actress-hedy-lamarr-became-mother-wi-fi

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. On the Arpanet - Computing Lives - IEEECS

     The fourth and final segment of the discussion about the 30-year history of research and development that created the underlying technologies on which the Web is based. Much of this foundation was laid in the 1960s by Douglas Carl Engelbart.

    https://www.computer.org/web/computing-lives/home/-/blogs/on-the-arpanet

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. The Demonstration - Computing Lives - IEEECS

     Part three of the discussion about the 30-year history of research and development that created the underlying technologies on which the Web is based. Much of this foundation was laid in the 1960s by Douglas Carl Engelbart.

    https://www.computer.org/web/computing-lives/home/-/blogs/the-demonstration

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Support from ARPA - Computing Lives - IEEECS

     Part two of the discussion about the 30-year history of research and development that created the underlying technologies on which the Web is based. Much of this foundation was laid in the 1960s by Douglas Carl Engelbart.

    https://www.computer.org/web/computing-lives/home/-/blogs/support-from-arpa

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Developing the Underlying Concepts for Contemporary Computing - Computing Lives - IEEECS

    A discussion about the 30-year history of research and development that created the underlying technologies on which the Web is based. Much of this foundation was laid in the 1960s by Douglas Carl Engelbart.

    https://www.computer.org/web/computing-lives/home/-/blogs/developing-the-underlying-concepts-for-contemporary-computing

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Cuneiform

    The Egyptians thought literacy was divine; a benefaction which came from the baboon-faced god Thoth. In fact the earliest known script – “cuneiform” – came from Uruk, a Mesopotamian settlement on the banks of the Euphrates in what is now Iraq. What did it say? As Tim Harford describes, cuneiform wasn’t being used for poetry, or to send messages to far-off lands. It was used to create the world’s first accounts. And the world’s first written contracts, too.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p050skkr

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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