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Tagged with “history” (217)

  1. How Aldus Manutius Saved Civilization with G. Scott Clemons

    On Monday October 26th, Scott Clemons was guest speaker at Type@Cooper in the Herb Lubalin Lecture series and delivered this talk at The Cooper Union. In the last decade of the 15th century, a middle-aged private tutor named Aldus Manutius made the stunning decision to leave the comfortable employ of a noble family and enter the cutthroat world of printing. The implications of that career change reverberate to this day throughout the worlds of textual criticism, book design, typography, book production, copyright law, collecting and classical philology. Whether by accident or design, Aldus’s decision put him in the right place at the right time to apply the relatively new technology of printing with movable type to the difficult task of printing Greek. As a result, virtually the entire surviving Greek canon found its way into print for the first time, and therefore into posterity. G. Scott Clemons has collected the Aldine Press since his days as an undergraduate in the Classics Department at Princeton University. He currently serves as the President of the Grolier Club, Treasurer of the Bibliographical Society of America, and is a past Chairman of the Friends of the Princeton University Library. Outside of his bibliophilic interests, Scott is the Chief Investment Strategist of Brown Brothers Harriman & Co., a privately-owned investment firm in New York City. Scott curated the exhibition Aldus Manutius: A Legacy More Lasting Than Bronze, on display at the Grolier Club this past spring, and is the co-author of a companion volume to the exhibition, is available from Oak Knoll Books.

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    Original video: https://vimeo.com/144912861
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 10 Jan 2017 15:31:07 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  2. The History of the iPhone, On Its 10th Anniversary | Internet History Podcast

    “So… Three things: A widescreen iPod with touch controls. A revolutionary mobile phone. And a breakthrough internet communications device. An iPod… a phone… and an internet communicator… An iPod, a phone… are you getting it? These are not three separate devices. This is one device! And we are calling it iPhone.”

    —Steve Jobs, January 9, 2007

    Those words have become so famous in the history of technology that I imagine a large percentage of readers have them memorized. Ten years ago this Monday, January 9, Steve Jobs stood on stage and announced the iPhone to the world. It was the crowning achievement in the career of the greatest technologist of our time, the moment that the modern era of computing began.

    On the ten year anniversary of the birth of the iPhone, this is the story of that moment and the history of that device which can take a rightful place alongside the original Macintosh, the first IBM PC, the Apple I, the Altair 8800, the DEC PDP-8, the IBM System/360 and the ENIAC as one of most important machines to have brought computing into everyday life.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2017/01/the-history-of-the-iphone/

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  3. Chapter 8 – How the Dotcom Bubble Happened | Internet History Podcast

    The background, root causes and rough outline of the dotcom bubble. How it happened, why it happened and why it’s unlikely to happen again anytime soon.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2017/01/chapter-8-how-the-dotcom-bubble-happened/

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  4. The iPhone

    Surprisingly, Uncle Sam played an essential role in the creation and development of the iPhone - of course, much has been written about the late Steve Jobs and other leading figures at Apple and their role in making the modern icon, and its subsequent impact on our lives. And rightfully so. But who are other key players without whom the iPhone might have been little more than an expensive toy? Tim Harford tells the story of how the iPhone became a truly revolutionary technology.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04hyzm5

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  5. The Shipping Container

    The boom in global trade was caused by a simple steel box. Shipping goods around the world was – for many centuries – expensive, risky and time-consuming. But 60 years ago the trucking entrepreneur Malcolm McLean changed all that by selling the idea of container shipping to the US military. Against huge odds he managed to turn ‘containerisation’ from a seemingly impractical idea into a massive industry – one that slashed the cost of transporting goods internationally and provoked a boom in global trade.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04g1ddh

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  6. The Haber-Bosch Process

    Saving lives with thin air - by taking nitrogen from the air to make fertiliser, the Haber-Bosch Process has been called the greatest invention of the 20th Century – and without it almost half the world’s population would not be alive today. A 100 years ago two German chemists, Fritz Haber and Carl Bosch, figured out a way to use nitrogen from the air to make ammonia, which makes fertiliser. It was like alchemy; ‘Brot aus Luft’, as Germans put it, ‘Bread from air’.

    Haber and Bosch both received a Nobel prize for their invention. But Haber’s place in history is controversial – he is also considered the ‘father of chemical warfare’ for his years of work developing and weaponising chlorine and other poisonous gases during World War One.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04f77rg

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  7. On Average - 99% Invisible

    IIn many ways, the built world was not designed for you. It was designed for the average person. Standardized tests, building codes, insurance rates, clothing sizes, The Dow Jones – all these measurements are based around the concept of an “average.”

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/on-average/

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  8. Lexicographer Ben Zimmer on the etymology of taking something with a grain of salt.

    A phrase with roots in Ancient Rome has confounded English speakers for centuries.

    Mike Vuolo and Bob Garfield discuss the etymology and history of the phrase with a grain of salt with Wall Street Journal language columnist Ben Zimmer

    http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2016/03/lexicographer_ben_zimmer_on_the_etymology_of_taking_something_with_a_grain.html

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  9. YANSS 089 – James Burke’s new project aims to help us deal with change, think connectively, and benefit from surprise – You Are Not So Smart

    In this episode of the YANSS Podcast, we sit down with legendary science historian James Burke, who returns to the show to explain his newest project, a Connections app that will allow anyone to search and think "connectively" when exploring Wikipedia. He launched the Kickstarter for the app this month. This is a link to learn more.…

    https://youarenotsosmart.com/2016/11/17/yanss-089-james-burkes-new-project-aims-to-help-us-deal-with-change-think-connectively-and-benefit-from-surprise/

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  10. The Concertina Man—BBC World Service Programme, 07 September 2004

    BBC programme on the history and music of the concertina, focusing on its inventor Sir Charles Wheatstone as a somewhat belated recognition of his bicentenary in 2002.

    In addition to the presenter, Peter Day, the program features (in order of appearance) Bob Gaskins, Brian Bowers, Margaret Birley, Stephen Chambers, Frank James, Douglas Rogers, Sean Minnie, and Steve Dickinson.

    The program was produced by Neil Koenig.

    BBC World Service programme broadcast 07 September 2004.

    http://www.concertina.com/concertina-man/

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