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Tagged with “history” (205)

  1. 228- Making Up Ground

    Large portions of San Francisco, New York City, Boston, Seattle, Hong Kong and Marseilles were built on top of human made land. What is now Mumbai, India, was transformed by the British from a seven-island archipelago to one contiguous strip of land. The most extraordinary example of land reclamation and manufacture may be the Netherlands. As early as the 9th century A.D., the Dutch began building dykes and pumping systems to create new land in places that were actually below sea level. But the historic scale of land manufacture is minuscule compared to the rate at which it is taking place today.

    Making Up Ground

    Sponsors Squarespace Casper MailChimp

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  2. 32 Dots Per Spaceship (Or, the Videogame That Changed Tech History)

    A look back at the origins of Spacewar!, the first original video game and one of the most influential pieces of software ever written. With special guests Stewart Brand and Spacewar! creator Steve Russell.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/wonderland-podcast/32-dots-per-spaceship-or-the-videogame-that-changed-tech-history
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 10 Sep 2016 21:51:54 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  3. Episode 08 :: Revisionist History Podcast

    Listen to “Blame Game” Episode 8 of The Revisionist History Podcast with Malcolm Gladwell.

    In the summer and fall of 2009, hundreds of Toyota owners came forward with an alarming allegation: Their cars were suddenly and uncontrollably accelerating. Toyota was forced to recall 10 million vehicles, pay a fine of more than $1 billion, and settle countless lawsuits. The consensus was that there was something badly wrong with the world’s most popular cars. Except that there wasn’t.

    “Blame Game” looks under the hood at one of the strangest public hysterias in recent memory. What really happened in all those Camrys and Lexuses? And how did so many drivers come to misunderstand so profoundly what was happening to them behind the wheel? The answer touches on our increasingly fraught relationship to technology and the dishonesty and naiveté of many in the media.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/08-blame-game

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  4. 5by5 | The Big Web Show #146: Know Your Web Design History – Glenn Davis of Project Cool, Cool Site of the Day, and The Web Standards Project

    Glenn Davis is the creator of Cool Site of the Day; cofounder of Project Cool; and cofounder, Executive Committee member, and essayist for The Web Standards Project, which he also hosted. Glenn was a leading force behind Liquid Design, an approach that predates Responsive Web Design by about 20 years. He taught everyone how to do “DHTML” via his Project Cool tutorials. In the Silicon Valley from 1994 through the early 2000s, Glenn was a huge creative force.

    In a lively hour, Glenn and host Jeffrey Zeldman discuss life before the animated GIF; “perceived bandwidth;” building their first websites; getting from Gopher to the web; SLIP and PPP connections; discovering UNIX; the story behind Cool Site of the Day; the battle for standards in our browsers; the web then versus the web now; and much, much more.

    http://5by5.tv/bigwebshow/146

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  5. Episode 07 :: Revisionist History Podcast

    Listen to “Hallelujah” Episode 7 of The Revisionist History Podcast with Malcolm Gladwell.

    In 1984, Elvis Costello released what he would say later was his worst record: Goodbye Cruel World. Among the most discordant songs on the album was the forgettable “The Deportees Club.” But then, years later, Costello went back and re-recorded it as “Deportee,” and today it stands as one of his most sublime achievements.

    “Hallelujah” is about the role that time and iteration play in the production of genius, and how some of the most memorable works of art had modest and undistinguished births.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/07-hallelujah

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  6. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, Connected Thinking

    Long before the heroics of the world wide web, the internet was born out of a mixture of American ambition and British thrift. Packet Switching was the name coined by Welsh computer scientist Donald Davies in an effort to link the early computers in the labs of the National Physical Laboratory in Teddington.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069xdy3

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  7. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, ERNIE Picks Prizes

    In 1956, adverts enticed the British public with a brand new opportunity. Buy premium bonds for one pound, for the chance to win a thousand. At the time, it was a fortune - half the price of the average house.

    Behind this tantalising dream was a machine called ERNIE - the Electronic Random Number Indicator Equipment.

    ERNIE was built by the team who constructed Colossus, the code-breaking engine housed at Bletchley Park. They had just nine months to make a machine that generated random numbers using all the latest kit, from printed circuit boards to metal transistors.

    In this episode, mathematician Hannah Fry talks to Dr Tilly Blyth from the Science Museum about how ERNIE became an unlikely celebrity. Featuring archive from NS&I, the Science Museum and the BBC Library.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069wzvw

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  8. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, LEO the Electronic Office

    Hannah Fry hears the incredible story of how a chain of British teashops produced the first office computer in the world.

    J Lyons and Company was the UK’s largest catering company, with 250 teashops across the country. They also owned their own bakeries, a tea plantation and haulage firm, as Dr Tilly Blyth from the Science Museum describes.

    By the 1950s, this vast business was drowning in paperwork. Lyons embarked on an ambitious new project to build a machine called LEO - the Lyons Electronic Office.

    Their office computer was based on the giant calculating machines being built inside UK universities to solve mathematical equations

    Sure, these machines could manage maths, but could they handle catering?

    Featuring archive from the British Library, the Science Museum and the LEO Society.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069rvb4

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  9. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, Electronic Brains

    From the mobile phone to the office computer, mathematician Hannah Fry looks back at 70 years of computing history, to reveal the UK’s lead role in developing the technology we use today.

    In the first episode, she travels back to the 1940s, to hear the incredible story of the creation, in Britain, of the computer memory.

    Three teams from across the country - in Teddington, Manchester and Cambridge - were tasked with designing automatic calculating engines for university research. But which team would be first to crack the tricky problem of machine memory?

    Meanwhile, tabloid headlines proclaimed that engineers were building ‘electronic brains’ that could match, and maybe surpass, the human brain, starting a debate about automation and artificial intelligence that still resonates today.

    Featuring archive from the Science Museum and the BBC Library, plus an interview with technology historian Dr James Sumner from Manchester University.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069r3rt

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  10. Kevin Kelly: How technology evolves | TED Talk | TED.com

    Tech enthusiast Kevin Kelly asks "What does technology want?" and discovers that its movement toward ubiquity and complexity is much like the evolution of life.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/kevin_kelly_on_how_technology_evolves?language=en

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