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Tagged with “health” (17)

  1. 5: Burnout with Tatiana Mac by Fullstack Health • A podcast on Anchor

    In this episode we talk with Tatiana Mac, a designer who builds inclusive, accessible, and ethical products with thoughtful practices. We discuss burnout through the lens of the events of the React community over the last week. The format is a bit different for this episode as we wanted to give Tatiana’s voice as much room as we could. We hope you enjoy this engaging conversation as much as we did.

    Transcript and show notes for this episode are available at https://fullstack.health/

    Just as a warning, there a couple f-bombs dropped in this episode!

    https://anchor.fm/fullstack-health/episodes/5-Burnout-with-Tatiana-Mac-e555p4

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  2. Start The Week: The health of science

    Tom Sutcliffe with Sir Robert Lechler, Jo Dunkley, Bernie Bulkin and Elizabeth Pisani.

    There is nothing new for chemistry to discover, says Bernie Bulkin. In Solving Chemistry: A Scientist’s Journey, the former Head of Science at BP argues that an unprecedented event has happened: a branch of science has made all the major discoveries it is likely to make. He tells Tom Sutcliffe what this means for chemistry - and for science more broadly.

    Medicine is in the midst of ‘a biomedical revolution’ says Professor Sir Robert Lechler. His own field of kidney transplants has been transformed by our new understanding of the immune system. He has helped to curate Spare Parts, an exhibition at the Science Gallery that poses the question: how many transplants could we have before we were no longer ourselves?

    Elizabeth Pisani has watched interest in different diseases rise and fall. As an epidemiologist she charts the impact that press attention and public grants have on medical research, with some becoming fashionable while in others treatments lag behind. And she warns that scientists too often fail to take account of the human context when delivering medicines.

    Astrophysicist Jo Dunkley assesses our understanding of the universe in a concise new guide. But the universe is 85% dark matter - and we still know very little about this. She draws attention to the brilliant female scientists who contributed to breakthroughs in physics, but whose contributions have been forgotten along the way.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00026ws

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  3. Is There a Place for Salt?

    Sheila Dillon asks if there is a place for salt in our cooking and if all salts are equal.

    Salt has long been prized, but in recent years it has become, for many, something to be avoided: to reduce or even eliminate. At the same time, there are new salt making businesses popping up all over the UK, celebrating salts with - they claim - unique characteristics due to their location and methods of production; they are salts of a place. In this edition of The Food Programme Sheila Dillon asks if there is a place for salt - in our kitchens and on our plates.

    Featuring chef and writer of ‘Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat’ Samin Nosrat, lexicographer and etymologist (and Dictionary Corner resident) Susie Dent, Senior Health Correspondent for online news site vox.com Julia Belluz, salt makers Alison and David Lea-Wilson, and the chef and author of ‘Salt is Essential’: Shaun Hill.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09zt49r

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  4. In the Wake of Wakefield

    Twenty years ago, in February 1998, one of the most serious public health scandals of the 20th century was born, when researcher, Andrew Wakefield and his co-authors published a paper in the medical journal The Lancet suggesting a link between the MMR vaccine and autism. As we know, in the years that followed, Wakefield’s paper was completely discredited as "an elaborate fraud" and retracted. Attempts by many other researchers to replicate his "findings" have all failed and investigations unearthed commercial links and conflicts of interests underpinning his original work. Wakefield himself was struck off the medical register.

    And yet, the ripples of that episode are still being felt today all over the world as a resurgent anti-vaccine movement continues to drive down inoculation rates, particularly in developed Western societies, where measles rates have rocketed particularly in Europe and the United States.

    But the Wakefield scandal hasn’t just fostered the current ant-vax movement but has played a key role in helping to undermine trust in a host of scientific disciplines from public health research to climate science and GM technology.

    Through the archive, science journalist Adam Rutherford explores the continuing legacy of the anti-vaccine movement on the anniversary of one of its most notorious episodes, and explore its impact on health, on research and on culture both at home and abroad.

    Adam Rutherford explores the 20-year legacy of a paper linking the MMR vaccine and autism.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05zfl70

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  5. BBC Radio 4 - Food Programme, A Fat Lot of Good

    With a growing array of oils on sale, Sheila Dillon cuts through the latest thinking.

    The range of fats and oils available to us is growing but the advice has changed dramatically. Sheila Dillon looks to cut through the latest thinking to help gain clarity of which we should be using when.

    She’s joined in the studio by Dr Michael Mosley whose recent investigation looked into how the composition of saturated and polyunsaturated fats changed when heated with food and resulted in the the production of dangerous aldehydes. Sheila finds out what response there has been since the programme and how he’s changed his own cooking and buying habits but what questions should we be asking when we eat out?

    Over the past decades animal fats have lost out in popularity and newer products like coconut oil have risen in prominence. Yet a butcher from Clonmel in Tipperary has seen his dripping crowned ‘supreme champion’ in the Great Taste awards - could this signify a change of thinking on what was once classed ‘unhealthy fats’. Meanwhile in parts of Italy a new disease is threatening olive trees.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06ltb5d

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  6. Unfinished Business 89: ‘Burger in a donut’ with Laura Kalbag

    This week’s an emotional episode of Unfinished Business. After talking about why a burger in a donut should never, ever have become a thing, Laura Kalbag and I discuss mental health issues in our industry. We talk about my own struggles with depression and depersonalisation disorder, issues that stem from my father’s own mental health issues and suicide.

    Geek Mental Help Week, October 27th

    Many of us struggle with mental health issues and many more than that are affected by it. Over the last few months, I’ve watched some of my dearest friends and others suffer from the the effects of mental health problems, either directly or indirectly.

    Our industry’s incredibly supportive of one another, but there’s more that we can do to help. That’s where the idea for Geek Mental Help Week came, starting October 27th, came from. A week of articles, blog posts, conversations and events across the about mental health and how we can help people affected by it.

    I need some help

    Listen to the show for more information—I’ll write more in a blog post later today—and for how you can help. Right now I’m looking for one or two volunteers to design and code a simple, single page site and host it on GitHub pages. If that could be you, please get in touch. You can email me via my Unfinished Business email address.

    http://unfinished.bz/89

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  7. On Point: In Conversation with Mark Bittman

    Food writer, food thinker Mark Bittman is one of the big voices relentlessly pushing, cajoling, inviting, instructing to change the way America eats. For our health, for the big world.

    He’s done it himself. Vegan ‘til six is his new mantra. Basically, eat plants all day, enjoy what you like in the evening. Your heart and health will thank you, he says. And so will an environment not asked to carry the groaning load of the way we eat now.

    He’s funny. He’s smart. He’s a good cook. He’s thinking about your plate and the planet.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Mining Books To Map Emotions Through A Century : Shots - Health News : NPR

    Anthropologists find that the use of "emotional" words in all sorts of books has soared and dipped across the past century, roughly mirroring each era’s social and economic upheavals. And psychologists say this new form of language analysis may offer a more objective view into our culture.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/04/01/175584297/mining-books-to-map-emotions-through-a-century

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  9. Facebook May Not Be So Friendly For Those With Low Self-Esteem : Shots - Health Blog : NPR

    They complain a bit more than everyone else, and they often share their negative views and feelings when face to face with friends and acquaintances. Researchers wondered whether those behavior patterns would hold true online.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2012/03/26/149237888/facebook-may-not-be-so-friendly-for-those-with-low-self-esteem

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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