adactio / tags / hackers

Tagged with “hackers” (9)

  1. Special: One on One with a Hacker - ShopTalk

    His fake name is “Earl Drudge”, an anagram of “Drug Dealer”. In early March 2014, he used some social engineering techniques and fake US federal documents to be granted full access to Chris’ servers. After missing the opportunity and a failed retaliation attempt, he posted sensitive personal information of Chris’ onto a site where not only can it never be removed, if it’s attempted to be removed becomes promoted.

    He agreed to talk with Chris directly and have it recorded for this show.

    We realize that this crosses the line of “feeding the trolls” or giving attention to “bad guys”, but we feel it relevant for our industry. Our lives and work are completely online and we’re all highly susceptible to types of hacks and identity theft. It should go without saying that you should not try to be a hero here: if you visit EarlDrudge’s site(s), try to expose his identity, or try to snoop around on him, you might actually put yourself in a position where you yourself might be vulnerable to being attacked. We advise you to simply listen.

    Update since the recording (from Chris): I was able to talk with Media Temple directly only hours after this conversation. One good end result is that they have changed their policy of how/when/what documents can be approved in which to grant access and who can do that. The retaliation attempt (“honeypot”) was verified to have been done by Media Temple. They were trying to catch the bad guy for me, and while I wish there was better communication about that, it’s nice to know they were trying to fight back on my behalf.

    http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/special-one-one-hacker/

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  2. Parmy Olson on Anonymous and LulzSec

    Parmy Olson, London Bureau chief for Forbes, discusses her new book We are Anonymous: Inside the Hacker World of Lulzsec, Anonymous and the Global Cyber Insurgency. The book is an inside look at the people behind Anonymous, explaining the movement’s origins as a group of online pranksters, and how they developed into the best known hacktivist organization in the world. Olson discusses the tension that has existed between those that would rather just engage in pranks and those that want to use Annoymous to protest different groups they see as trying to clamp down on internet freedom, as well as some of the group’s most famous campaigns like the attacks against the Church of Scientology and the campaign against Paypal and Mastercard. Olson also describes the development of LulzSec which became famous for a series of attacks in 2011 on high profile web thangs including Fox, PBS, Sony, and the CIA.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2012/07/24/parmy-olson/

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  3. Gabriella Coleman on the ethics of free software

    Gabriella Coleman, the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy in the Art History and Communication Studies Department at McGill University, discusses her new book, “Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking,” which has been released under a Creative Commons license.

    Coleman, whose background is in anthropology, shares the results of her cultural survey of free and open source software (F/OSS) developers, the majority of whom, she found, shared similar backgrounds and world views. Among these similarities were an early introduction to technology and a passion for civil liberties, specifically free speech.

    Coleman explains the ethics behind hackers’ devotion to F/OSS, the social codes that guide its production, and the political struggles through which hackers question the scope and direction of copyright and patent law. She also discusses the tension between the overtly political free software movement and the “politically agnostic” open source movement, as well as what the future of the hacker movement may look like.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2013/01/08/gabriella-coleman-2/

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  4. Talk of the Nation : NPR, Op-Ed: We Need More Aaron Swartz-Style Hacktivism

    Journalist Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape. From politics and public service to education, religion, music and health care, Talk of the Nation offers call-in listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians and artists from around the world.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/rundowns/rundown.php?prgId=5&prgDate=03-11-2013

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  5. Chris Anderson: The Makers Revolution - The Long Now

    We’re now entering the third industrial revolution, Anderson said. The first one, which began with the spinning jenny in 1776, doubled the human life span and set population soaring. From the demographic perspective, "it’s as if nothing happened before the Industrial Revolution."

    The next revolution was digital. Formerly industrial processes like printing were democratized with desktop publishing. The "cognitive surplus" of formerly passive consumers was released into an endless variety of personal creativity. Then distribution was democratized by the Web, which is "scale agnostic and credentials agnostic." Anyone can potentially reach 7 billion people.

    The third revolution is digital manufacturing, which combines the gains of the first two revolutions. Factory robots, which anyone can hire, have become general purpose and extremely fast. They allow "lights-out manufacturing," that goes all night and all weekend.

    "This will reverse the arrow of globalization," Anderson said. "The centuries of quest for cheaper labor is over. Labor arbitrage no longer drives trade." The advantages of speed and flexibility give the advantage to "locavore" manufacturing because "Closer is faster." Innovation is released from the dead weight of large-batch commitments. Designers now can sit next to the robots building their designs and make adjustments in real time.

    Thus the Makers Movement. Since 2006, Maker Faires, Hackerspaces, and TechShops (equipped with laser cutters, 3D printers, and CAD design software) have proliferated in the US and around the world. Anderson said he got chills when, with the free CAD program Autodesk 123D, he finished designing an object and moused up to click the button that used to say "Print." This one said "Make." A 3D printer commenced building his design.

    Playing with Minecraft, "kids are becoming fluent in polygons." With programs like 123D Catch you can take a series of photos with your iPhone of any object, and the software will create a computer model of it. "There is no copyright on physical stuff," Anderson pointed out. The slogan that liberated music was "Rip. Mix. Burn." The new slogan is "Rip. Mod. Make."

    I asked Anderson, "But isn’t this Makers thing kind of trivial, just trailing-edge innovation?" "That’s why it’s so powerful," Anderson said. "Remember how trivial the first personal computers seemed?"

    — by Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02013/feb/19/makers-revolution/

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  6. 3620 Podcast: F is Not For Phreak

    We celebrated our one month anniversary a few days ago, so it seemed fitting to run with the very first episode that we produced back when we were kicking around ideas for getting the podcast off the ground. It’s a page out of Kevin’s research on the history of hacker culture, which turns to a meditation on the role of telephony and sound in our world. Enjoy!

    Major Thanks…

    The phreak who goes by Mark Bernay is a wonderful and gracious guy for talking with me and for lending me some of his audio to use in this episode. If you want to check out more of his recordings, head over to Phone Trips.

    Music

    • “Real Love” by Delorean (0:00)
    • “Imitosis” by Andrew Bird (2:32 & 8:14)
    • “Dead Media” by Hefner (4:53)
    • “Pick Up the Phone” by Dragonette (9:44)

    http://podcast.asc.upenn.edu/2012/10/episode-6-f-is-not-for-phreak/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. DIY ‘Hackers’ Tinker Everyday Things Into Treasure : NPR

    Most people think of a hacker as someone who breaks into computer networks, but many in the do-it-yourself movement have adopted the term for themselves. DIY hackers take everyday items and hack, or modify, them to serve new purposes. In the last few years, work spaces dedicated to their craft have been sprouting up all over North America.

    http://www.npr.org/2010/11/12/131268511/diy-hackers-tinker-everyday-things-into-treasure

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