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Tagged with “future tense” (9)

  1. The physical reality of our digital world - Future Tense - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    We often think of our digital world as something that’s not about physical stuff, but about things that happen out there in the air, in space. We speak of cyber space and cloud-computing. But how much of our digital infrastructure is grounded in physical reality? And what are some of the future implications of the growing push to move more of our data into cloud based technology?

    Guests:
    Andrew Blum, Correspondent for Wired and Contributing Editor to Metropolis. Author of ‘Tubes: Behind The Scenes At The Internet’.

    Dr danah boyd, Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research and Research Assistant Professor in Media, Culture and Communication at New York University.

    Ted Striphas, Associate Professor of Media and Cultural Studies at Indiana University’s Department of Communication and Culture.

    John Naughton, Professor of the Public Understanding of Technology at the Open University in the UK and columnist for The Observer Newspaper.

    Gary Cook, Senior Policy Analyst, Cool IT Campaign, Greenpeace International.

    Rich Wolski, Chief Technology Officer and Co-founder of Eucalyptus Systems Inc. And Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

    Publications:
    Title: Tubes: Behind The Scenes At The Internet
    Author: Andrew Blum
    Publisher: Viking (Penguin Australia)

    Further Information:
    Andrew Blum’s website (http://andrewblum.net/)
    Rich Wolski’s webpage (http://www.cs.ucsb.edu/~rich/)
    Ted Striphas website (http://www.indiana.edu/~cmcl/faculty/striphas.shtml)
    GreenPeace Cool IT Challenge (http://www.greenpeace.org/international/en/campaigns/climate-change/cool-it/)
    danah boyd’s website (http://www.danah.org/)
    John Naughton’s Guardian Profile (http://www.guardian.co.uk/profile/johnnaughton)

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/the-physical-reality-of-our-digital-world/4150766

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Humans and technology: two perspectives from two eminent thinkers - Future Tense

    In this edition of Future Tense we hear from two prominent thinkers on the intersection between humanity and technology.

    Nicholas Carr is the best-selling author of The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to our Brains. He’s just released his latest book entitled The Glass Cage: Automation and Us. Carr ponders our willingness to give over to the machine: to allow computers and robots to assume the difficult and high-level thinking tasks that, according to Carr, form the very basis of our ongoing creativity.

    Our second guest, Alexis Madrigal is a visiting scholar at UC Berkeley’s Center for Science, Technology, Medicine and Society. He’s also a prominent American technology journalist and thinker. Madrigal just left his role as deputy editor of The Atlantic.com to take up a new position as Silicon Valley Bureau Chief for Fusion – a digital cable and satellite television network. Robotics, says Madrigal, will help us rethink our humanity. But he also worries that our understanding of the future has become too tech-centric and dominated by the big digital players.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/humans-and-technology--ep/5844122#transcript

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Online Comments - a “wicked” problem - Future Tense

    It’s a wicked problem, says social technologist Suw Charman-Anderson. That is, the lack of civility online when people leave comments.

    We tend to blame the poison on so-called "trolls". But does blaming others overlook our own role in reducing standards of online discourse?

    In a two part series, Future Tense looks at the difficulties involved in fostering a genuine online discussion. And we question why so many comment threads quickly deteriorate into the banal, offensive and abusive.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/online-comments---ep/5795478

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Reinventing archival methods - Future Tense, ABC Radio Nation

    Archivists were once the people who managed and preserved our records. They were the ones you turned to first if you needed information.

    But in an environment where documents are now just a mouse click away how do archivists ensure they remain relevant in the 21st century? We talk about data systems, preservation and relevancy in the modern world of the archivist – the record keeper.

    The Australian Society of Archivists assisted Future Tense in attending the Recordkeeping Roundtable workshop. They had no role in editorial or content decisions relating to this program.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Many Internets, many lives - Future Tense - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    How is the vision we have of our digital lives matching the reality? In a digital age who are we connected to and who are we not connected to? Should we re-think how evenly distributed access to the Internet really is? Two leading Internet scholars talk about the ways in which people are engaging with the digital world — from Australia and Africa to the suburbs of Boston and Shanghai and all points in between.

    Guests:
    Ethan Zuckerman, Director of MIT’s Centre for Civic Media and co-founder of Global Voices.

    Dr Genevieve Bell, Intel Fellow, Intel Labs Director, Interaction and Experience Research

    Further Information:
    RiverBend Books- Meet The Author Information (http://www.riverbendbooks.com.au/product/648347-MeettheAuthorAntonyFunnell-rbe11sep)
    SABRENet (http://www.sabrenet.edu.au/)
    Ethan Zuckerman’s blog (http://www.ethanzuckerman.com/blog/)
    MIT Centre for Civic Media (http://civic.mit.edu/)
    2012 RN Big Ideas Program with Genevieve Bell (http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/what-does-our-technology-future-look-like3f/4003568)

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/many-internets2c-many-lives/4241874

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Digital archaeology and the temporary nature of technology

    As our fast paced digital world continues what does that mean for the way we think about preserving things like old webpages and obsolete media formats. Are there possible lessons from our digital past for our digital future? We explore the fragility of our electronic data and also the temporary nature of the technology we use to access it. We also join the excavation of a 1970s computer chip - called the 6502!

    Guests:
    Finn Brunton, Assistant Professor of Digital Environments at the University of Michigan’s School of Information.
    Jim Boulton, Curator of the ‘Digital Archaeology’ exhibition and Deputy Managing Director of Story Worldwide.
    Greg James, Digital archaeologist, part of the visual 6502 team and software engineer.
    Brewster Kahle, Digital Librarian and Founder of the Internet Archive.
    Paul Koerbin, Manager of web archiving at the National Library of Australia.

    Further Information:
    Finn Brunton’s profile (http://finnb.net/)

    Finn Brunton interview on ‘dead media’ (http://www.pcworld.idg.com.au/article/390536/_dead_media_never_really_die/)

    The Internet Archive (http://www.archive.org/)

    Pandora Archive (http://pandora.nla.gov.au/)

    Digital Archaeology Exhibition (http://www.storyworldwide.com/digital-archaeology/)

    Visual 6502 Project (http://visual6502.org/)

    Archaeology Magazine feature on digital archaeology (http://www.archaeology.org/1107/features/mos_technology_6502_computer_chip_cpu.html)

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/digital-archaeology-and-the-temporary-nature-of-technology/3790090#comments

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Gamification: why shouldn’t life be a game? - Future Tense - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    There are lots of examples of how games and a sense of play can engage people. But as the barriers between the gaming world and the real world break down, does that mean we can use more aspects of gaming in our everyday lives? The idea of gamification—using game mechanics to make changes in the real world—is growing. But is it possible to turn everything into a game?

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/gamification-why-shouldnt-life-be-a-game/3667492

    —Huffduffed by adactio