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Tagged with “food” (224)

  1. Rachel Laudan on the History of Food and Cuisine - Econlib

    Rachel Laudan, visiting scholar at the University of Texas and author of Cuisine and Empire, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the history of food. Topics covered include the importance of grain, the spread of various styles of cooking, why French cooking has elite status, and the reach of McDonald’s. The conversation concludes with a discussion of the appeal of local food and other recent food passions.

    http://www.econtalk.org/rachel-laudan-on-the-history-of-food-and-cuisine/

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  2. Is There a Place for Salt?

    Sheila Dillon asks if there is a place for salt in our cooking and if all salts are equal.

    Salt has long been prized, but in recent years it has become, for many, something to be avoided: to reduce or even eliminate. At the same time, there are new salt making businesses popping up all over the UK, celebrating salts with - they claim - unique characteristics due to their location and methods of production; they are salts of a place. In this edition of The Food Programme Sheila Dillon asks if there is a place for salt - in our kitchens and on our plates.

    Featuring chef and writer of ‘Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat’ Samin Nosrat, lexicographer and etymologist (and Dictionary Corner resident) Susie Dent, Senior Health Correspondent for online news site vox.com Julia Belluz, salt makers Alison and David Lea-Wilson, and the chef and author of ‘Salt is Essential’: Shaun Hill.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09zt49r

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Music and Food: Sounds Delicious!

    Dan Saladino explores the relationship between tunes and taste with Andi Oliver on the link between Sam Cooke and roast chicken and chef Stephen Harris on food and The Buzzcocks.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bcfzxl

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. A visit to Hummustown

    Eating is a political act, as Wendell Berry reminded us. Which is why I was very happy to sample the food on offer by Syrian refugees in Hummustown.

    Refugees selling the food of their homeland to get a start in a new life is, by now, a cliché. Khaled (in the photo) joined their ranks a year ago. But cliché or not, selling food is an important way to give people work to do, wages, and hope. If it’s happening on your doorstep, which it is, and the food is good, which it is, what’s a hungry podcaster to do? Go there, obviously, and report back. Which is why, a couple of weeks ago, I found myself, microphone in hand, waiting patiently in line for a falafel wrap.

    Truth be told, there aren’t that many Syrian refugees in Italy. The most recent official statistics put the total at around 5000 with a little over 600 in Rome. Hummustown is helping a few of them.

    https://www.eatthispodcast.com/a-visit-to-hummustown/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Homaro Cantu, the genius chef who wanted to change the world – podcast | News | The Guardian

    How a homeless child grew up to become the most inventive chef in history.

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2018/apr/16/the-life-and-death-of-homaro-cantu-the-genius-chef-who-wanted-to-change-the-world-podcast

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  6. The Trip: Episode 1: The Root of All Things

    Episode 1: The Root of All Things January 18, 2018

    A clear-eyed journey through the Amazon, hallucinogens, to sickness and back to health.

    http://roadsandkingdoms.com/the-trip-podcast/

    download

    Tagged with food travel

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  7. The Basement Tapes

    Listen to “The Basement Tapes” Season 2 Episode 10 of The Revisionist History Podcast with Malcolm Gladwell.

    A cardiologist in Minnesota searches through the basement of his childhood home for a missing box of data from a long-ago experiment. What he discovers changes our understanding of the modern American diet — but also teaches us something profound about what really matters when we honor our parents’ legacy.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/20-the-basement-tapes

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. McDonald’s Broke My Heart

    Listen to “McDonald’s Broke My Heart” Season 2 Episode 9 of The Revisionist History Podcast with Malcolm Gladwell.

    McDonald’s used to make the best fast food french fries in the world — until they changed their recipe in 1990. Revisionist History travels to the top food R&D lab in the country to discover what was lost, and why for the past generation we’ve been eating french fries that taste like cardboard.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/19-mcdonalds-broke-my-heart

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Butterbeer and Grootcakes

    Aleks Krotoski takes her seat at the table to explore the amazing world of fictional food made real.

    Food is not a new force in fiction, but increasingly fictional food is finding its way onto the table. And fan communities from the new breed of modern cultural canon aren’t just nibbling on Laura Esquivel’s devastating quail in rose petal sauce from Like Water for Chocolate, but also tucking in to fried squirrel and raccoon from The Hunger Games, Sansa’s lemon cakes from Game of Thrones, or downing a frothy glass of butterbeer from Harry Potter.

    Now Aleks gathers together three people who know a lot about fictional food to discuss its appeal for fans, authors and food creators alike. Together, they will make, and eat, a meal of food from fiction, and discuss some of the interesting questions it raises.

    Joanne Harris is author of several novels where food is almost a character in its own right - most famously Chocolat, which was turned into a film of the same name; she also co-created a cookbook, The Little Book of Chocolat, for the many fans desperate to make the concoctions they had read about in her novels. Sam Bompas is co-founder of creative food studio Bompas & Parr, who recently helped create Dinner At The Twits, inspired by Roald Dahl’s book. And Kate Young brings together her passion for food and literature in her blog The Little Library Café, where she creates recipes for food found in fiction, and many of them will be included in her first cookbook, The Little Library Cookbook.

    The programme also includes music played on the flavour conductor - a working cocktail organ, conceived by Sam Bompas for Johnnie Walker. The music is composed by Simon Little.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0560f1h

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. It’s putrid, it’s paleo, and it’s good for you

    John Speth on how food we may consider disgusting is essential for survival in the Arctic, with added disgusting goodness from Paul Rozin.

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/its-putrid-its-paleo-and-its-good-for-you/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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