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Tagged with “food” (233)

  1. Rocket Fuel: Cooking the Books with Mary Robinette Kowal – FRAN WILDE

    What Mary Robinette Kowal brings to the Cooking the Books table is no fewer than seven novels, two short story collections, more than 70 short stories, a blog that boosts other writers with My Favorite Bit, advocacy and volunteering, the Writing Excuses Podcast AND Cruise, the Futurescapes Writing Workshop, and a somewhat unfortunate attachment to okra, although she explains to me frequently that I’ve just not had it cooked properly. There’s a lot more as well (audio recordings, puppetry, a serious dedication to both fashion and typewriters…)

    Mary is an outstanding cook and has been visiting NASA often for research on her latest books — part of the Lady Astronaut of Mars series — The Calculating Stars and The Fated Sky, the first of which is out July 3. (the second appears August 21). So of course we asked her about space food.

    She joins Aliette de Bodard and me for Cooking the Books this month (in our 65th interview & 38th podcast episode!) to dish on all the details.

    https://franwilde.wordpress.com/2018/06/27/rocket-fuel-cooking-the-books-with-mary-robinette-kowal/

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  2. Eat Some Bacteria

    How fermented foods might be the key to a healthy brain, body and mind.

    In this episode, Michael speaks to expert Kirsten Berding Harold, University College Cork, for all the latest science on all things good bacteria. Our willing human guinea pig Clare has a go making her own kefir at home and Michael has a go at cultivating some healthy bacteria in the form of sauerkraut - which he claims is far simpler to make at home than you might think!

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000v3g2

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  3. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Food

    Melvyn Bragg explores the history of food in Modern Europe. The French philosopher of food Brillat-Savarin wrote in his Physiology of Taste, ‘The pleasures of the table belong to all times and all ages, to every country and to every day; they go hand in hand with all our other pleasures; outlast them, and remain to console us for their loss’ . The story of food is cultural as well as culinary, and what we eat and how we eat has always been linked to who we are or whom we might become, from the great humanist thinker Erasmus warning us to ‘Always use a fork!’ to the materialist philosopher Feuerbach telling us baldly, ‘You are what you eat’.But what have we eaten, and why? In Europe since the Renaissance how have our intellectual appetites fed our empty stomachs? With Rebecca Spang, Lecturer in Modern History at University College London; Ivan Day, food historian; Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, Professor of Modern History at Oxford University.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00547n1

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  4. The Man Who Tried to Feed the World

    Norman Borlaug won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970 for his work as a wheat breeder. The disease-resistant, dwarf wheats that he developed were the foundation of the Green Revolution, banishing global famine and turning India into a food-exporting nation. Many people have hailed Borlaug as a saint, a saviour of humanity. Others have blamed him for everything that is wrong with the modern global food system. The truth, naturally, lies somewhere in between, which is brought out in a new documentary about Borlaug and his work.

    The documentary airs on PBS in the United States next week. I got the chance to see a preview and to talk to Rob Rapley, the writer, director and producer.

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  5. Revisionist History Podcast Episode 8: In a Metal Mood

    Two seasons after its investigation of the decline of McDonalds french fries, Revisionist History returns to fast-food’s high-tech test kitchens. This time the subject is cultural appropriation. The case study is Taco Bell. Oh, and Pat Boone is involved.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/38-in-a-metal-mood

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  6. Ed Levine: Serious Eater | Commonwealth Club

    This program is part of our Food Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation.

    Founded in 2006 by former New York Times food contributor Ed Levine, food blog Serious Eats has combined storytelling and culinary expertise to become one of the most acclaimed food sites in the world. The site provides in-depth recipes and reviews of food products and kitchen equipment carefully tested by culinary professionals in order to provide thorough and trustworthy reviews for its readers.

    Levine’s forthcoming book, Serious Eater: A Food Lover’s Perilous Quest for Pizza and Redemption, recounts his challenging journey to create a successful online food publication. Levine bought the domain name Serious Eats for $100 and created the blog as a space to connect other like-minded eaters. Over the course of 10 years and with the help of a dedicated team and a supportive family, Levine has made Serious Eats into an established website with a large following. In addition to Serious Eater, Levine is also the author of New York Eats, New York Eats (More), and Pizza: A Slice of Heaven. He also hosts “Special Sauce,” a weekly podcast covering food in conversation with various prominent figures within the culinary landscape and beyond.

    Join Levine live at INFORUM as he reflects on his transformation from food writer to entrepreneur. This conversation will be moderated by Chef J. Kenji López-Alt, chief culinary adviser for Serious Eater and author of the James Beard Award–nominated column “The Food Lab.”

    Notes

    Levine photo by Robyn Lee

    López-Alt photo © Vicky Wasik

    ** This Podcast Contains Explicit Language **

    https://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/archive/podcast/ed-levine-serious-eater

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  7. Rachel Laudan on the History of Food and Cuisine - Econlib

    Rachel Laudan, visiting scholar at the University of Texas and author of Cuisine and Empire, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the history of food. Topics covered include the importance of grain, the spread of various styles of cooking, why French cooking has elite status, and the reach of McDonald’s. The conversation concludes with a discussion of the appeal of local food and other recent food passions.

    http://www.econtalk.org/rachel-laudan-on-the-history-of-food-and-cuisine/

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