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Tagged with “folk” (14)

  1. “JUST A BANJO PLAYER”: Rhiannon Giddens - Ireland’s Edge | Acast

    Once referred to as a ‘performing historian’ Rhiannon Giddens is a musician from Greensboro, North Carolina whose career has ranged from folk to country, blues to gospel, opera to R&B. Her old-time string band, the Carolina Chocolate Drops have received 6 Grammy nominations, winning in 2010 for their album Genuine Negro Jig.

    In 2017 Rhiannon received a MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant for ‘reclaiming African American contributions to folk and country music and bringing to light new connections between music from the past and the present’.

    At Ireland’s Edge, she speaks to music journalist Jim Carroll about race, influence and appropriation of African-American music, and cross-cultural collaboration all through the story of the banjo in the United States.

    https://shows.acast.com/irelands-edge/episodes/just-a-banjo-player-rhiannon-giddens

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  2. David Attenborough - World Music Collector

    David Attenborough reveals a side of himself that nobody knows, as a collector of music from all over the world. We hear the stories that surround it, and the music itself.

    One of David Attenborough’s first projects was ‘Alan Lomax - Song Hunter’, a television series he produced in 1953-4. The famous collector of the blues and folk music of America gathered traditional musicians from all over Britain and Ireland and, for the first time, they appeared on television. David loved the music, the people and, inspired by Lomax, he became music collector himself.

    From the start there was a connection between wildlife and folk culture broadcasting: BBC natural history staff shared an office, and equipment, with colleagues busy recording traditional songs, tunes and stories. Soon after ‘Song Hunter’ Attenborough began travelling the world for the series ‘Zoo Quest’. This time the hunt was for animals, captured live for London Zoo. The series also looked at the culture of local people and if he came across music Attenborough recorded it. In Paraguay he met some amazing harp players and recorded what became the series’ signature tune. This started a craze. Remember Los Trios Paraguayos?

    Wherever he went to make programmes David Attenborough recorded musicians. When the lads carrying the crew’s baggage in New Guinea started singing, he taped them. He recorded songs in Borneo longhouses, drumming in Sierra Leone, gamelan music in Java, Aboriginal didgeridoo players and palace music in Tonga.

    Attenborough gave the music to the BBC and it has sat, unheard, in the Sound Library ever since. Now he listens again to recordings he made half a century ago. He reveals the memories and stories they evoke, and his delight in the music.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p067sqpm

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  3. The Wednesday Session | shmu

    The Wednesday Session - jointly hosted by local musicians Kenny Hadden and Colin Edwards – will bring you the best of traditional and contemporary folk music.

    The programme will include music and songs from the traditions of Scotland, England, Ireland, and also much further afield.

    We’ll keep you informed about local events, and occasionally have live guests in the studio to talk about their music. Look up The Wednesday Session at SHMU on Facebook.

    http://www.shmu.org.uk/fm/shows/wednesday-session

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  4. 17. The Bird Fancier’s Delight with Sarah Angliss - The OdditoriumThe Odditorium

    A composer, inventor and historian of sound and the uncanny – Sarah Angliss’ music reflects her lifelong obsession with defunct technology, faded variety acts and English folklore. In this talk she discusses the practices of training animals to mimic human behaviour, language and song.

    Hoover the Talking Seal

    Jacko the Talking Fish

    Learned Pig

    Clever Hans

    The Serinette by Chardin

    Neurogenesis

    Sparky the Budgie

    http://oddpodcast.com/portfolio/the-bird-fancyers-delight-with-sarah-angliss/

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  5. Spring-heeled Jack, Mystery Assailant! | Stuff You Missed in History Class: The Podcast

    Most people are familiar with Jack the Ripper, but Victorian England was also plagued by an odd character named Spring-Heeled Jack. Were reports of this bounding scoundrel a symptom of mass hysteria, or something factual? Tune in to learn more.

    http://www.missedinhistory.com/podcasts/spring-heeled-jack-mystery-assailant/

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  6. Martin Carthy - The Music Show

    Martin Carthy has been one of the most important and influential figures in English folk song. During the 60’s folk revival even Americans were covering his songs, including Bob Dylan. Martin Carthy, his wife Norma Waterson and their daughter Eliza Carthy have continued this tradition singing together and separately for decades. This is a long conversation with Martin on the eve of his visit to the National Folk Festival in Canberra.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/musicshow/martin-carthy/5369650

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  7. Doc Watson, Folk Music Icon, Dies At 89 : The Record : NPR

    The blind folk musician from North Carolina revolutionized not just how people play guitar but the way people around the world think about mountain music. He was 89 years old.

    His manager said in a statement that Watson died at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, after abdominal surgery last week.

    Watson was born in Deep Gap, N.C., in the Blue Ridge Mountains, in a three-room house he shared with eight brothers and sisters. He revolutionized not just how people play guitar but the way people around the world think about mountain music.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2012/05/29/153697428/doc-watson-folk-music-icon-dies-at-89

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  8. The Byrds’ Roger McGuinn Works To Preserve Folk Music : NPR

    Singer-guitarist Roger McGuinn, best known as leader of The Byrds, is a folk-rock pioneer. Since the group disbanded, McGuinn has pursued a solo career, and also created the Folk Den Project, an online database of traditional songs he records.

    https://www.npr.org/2012/04/18/150890766/the-byrds-roger-mcguinn-works-to-preserve-folk?ft=1&f=5

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