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Tagged with “film:title=2001” (13)

  1. Weird Studies Episode 75: Our Old Friend the Monolith: On Stanley Kubrick’s ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’

    JF and Phil discuss a film they’ve been bringing up since the beginning of the podcast: Kubrick’s masterful 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968).

    "You don’t find reality only in your own backyard, you know," Stanley Kubrick once told an interviewer. "In fact, sometimes that’s the last place you’ll find it." Oddly, this episode of Weird Studies begins with Phil Ford hatching the idea of putting a replica of the monolith from 2001 in his backyard. As the ensuing discussion suggests, this would amount to putting reality — or the Real, as we like to call it — in the place where it may be least apparent. Perhaps that is what Kubrick did when he planted his monolithic film in thousands of movie theatres back in 1968. Moviegoers went in expecting a Kubrickian twist on Buck Rogers; they came out changed by the experience, much like the hominids of great veld in the "Dawn of Man" sequence that opens the film. This is what all great art does, and if you look closely, maybe 2001 can tell you something about how it does it. Because in the end, the film is the monolith, and the monolith is all art.

    https://www.weirdstudies.com/75

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  2. I Think You’re Interesting - Why 2001: A Space Odyssey is still one of the greatest films ever made, 50 years later | Listen via Stitcher Radio On Demand

    Even if you haven’t seen 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick’s mind-melting 1968 science fiction epic, you probably know at least something about it. It’s one of those movies, like Star Wars or Citizen Kane, that has become so thoroughly dissolved into our pop culture that you’ll have heard of the villainous computer HAL or know the famed music cue (Richard Strauss’ “Also sprach Zarathustra”) that plays over its most indelible images.

    But how were those moments created? The story of 2001 is the story of an almost obsessive attention to detail, of a budget that almost completely destroyed the film’s studio, of an initial wave of terrible reviews that might have killed a lesser movie. At every step of the way along its production process (and even after its release), 2001 is a fascinating example of big-time moviemaking gone right.This week, Todd is joined first by Vox film critic Alissa Wilkinson to talk about 2001’s long legacy, then by author Michael Benson, whose book Space Odyssey Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece is the definitive account of the making of the film, to talk about how this titanic achievement came to be.

    https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/vox/i-think-youre-interesting/e/54242528

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  3. The Incomparable | Overture and Apes (Episode 431)

    Pick up a femur, order a moon sandwich, and always remember to bring your space helmet with you! On its 50th anniversary, we’re discussing Stanley Kubrick’s classic “2001: A Space Odyssey.” What is the Monolith’s purpose? When and why does HAL become murderous? And why is there so much solarized stock footage of landscapes? Watch out for cheetahs!

    https://www.theincomparable.com/theincomparable/431/

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  4. “2001: A Space Odyssey”: What It Means, and How It Was Made | The New Yorker

    Fifty years ago, Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke set out to make a new kind of sci-fi. How does their future look now that it’s the past?

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/04/23/2001-a-space-odyssey-what-it-means-and-how-it-was-made

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  5. The Film Programme — 2001: A Space Odyssey

    As 2001: A Space Odyssey is re-released in cinemas, Francine Stock presents a special edition on Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece. ‘My God, it’s Full of Stars’ were the last words of Dave Bowman before he journeyed through the Stargate, according to writer Arthur C. Clarke but it’s an apt description for this edition of The Film Programme. Francine journeys through time and space to uncover the mysteries of this 1968 classic. Searching for the mind of HAL. and lost alien worlds among the delights of the Stanley Kubrick Archive at London’s University of the Arts. Joining Francine on her voyage of discovery are 2001 chronicler Piers Bizony, former urbane spaceman Keir Dullea and the woman who built the moon! Other voices include production designer Harry Lange, make-up genius Stuart Freeborn, editor Ray Lovejoy, all now so much stardust, as well as those of lead ape ‘Moonwatcher’ (Dan Richter) & Stargate deviser Douglas Trumbull. Open the Pod Bay Doors HAL!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/film

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  6. Astronaut Chris Hadfield on Why Gravity Needed More Adult Diapers | Underwire | Wired.com

    In the latest episode of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast astronaut Chris Hadfield discusses his love of science fiction.

    Astronaut Chris Hadfield is the first Canadian to walk in space, and also the first Canadian to command the International Space Station. A YouTube video of him singing the David Bowie song “Space Oddity” in zero-g has been viewed almost 20 million times. He’s also the author of the bestselling new memoir An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth. But before all that, he was just a kid reading science fiction.

    “I read it all kind of voraciously,” Hadfield says in Episode 100 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. “Just letting those good writers help my imagination stretch and soar.”

    Early pulp adventures taught him that desperate astronauts might achieve vectored thrust by venting their water tanks into space, an idea he kept in the back of his mind on his own missions. And he’s always delighted when film and television portrayals capture the reality of space travel, such as the scene in 2001: A Space Odyssey when an astronaut goes on a space walk.

    “In 2001 they guessed right,” says Hadfield. “They did an accurate portrayal of the sense of aloneness, and the sounds, and what it would really be like. And it helped it be slightly more familiar.”

    Listen to our complete interview with Chris Hadfield in Episode 100 of Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy (above), in which he discusses why Gravity needed more adult diapers, why the dinosaurs should’ve had a space program, and what to do if you ever find a snake in your cockpit. Then stick around after the interview as frequent guest geek Matt London joins hosts John Joseph Adams and David Barr Kirtley to celebrate 100 episodes of Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy.

    http://www.wired.com/underwire/2013/12/geeks-guide-chris-hadfield/

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  7. The 2001 Post | Squaremans

    I work with an amazing team of creative people across many disciplines and because it’s video games many of these people are younger than me and one of the things I’ve noticed about people in their 20s right now is that they don’t have all the bullshit cultural baggage that the Baby Boomers and their kids (my generation) carried around. 2001: A Space Odyssey is famous for being impenetrable and a lot of people my age have this “screw that movie” attitude. they resent being challenged, reset the respect the movie gets. Something to do with entitlement, I think.

    But the guys I work with, younger guys, their attitude is “that movie was weird, what was going on?” They know something’s going on, they don’t mind saying “I didn’t get it” and they’re curious. I love that. No cultural baggage, no chip on their shoulder. Open curiosity. Intellectual curiosity, artistic curiosity.

    One day someone asks me if I’ve seen 2001 and then, when I said I had, they didn’t say “did you like it?” They went straight to “what was that movie about? What was the Monolith? Why did HAL kill that guy?” and as I gave what I thought were my answers, this amazing dialog between me and a bunch of artists opened up and we all came away having noticed things and thought about things we hadn’t before.

    So I figured, hey, why not write it all down. But that was boring. What was fun was talking about it. So I decided to do a podcast of sorts. I started by writing, I’m a writer, but after a couple of paragraphs I said “this is stupid.” It lacked the spontaneity of the original conversation so I just turned the mike on and started talking. That was surprisingly easy and this is the result.

    Maybe someone will get a kick out of it, maybe someone will take it and do something interesting with it, put their own images to it, whatever. If there’s a positive response, maybe I’ll do more of these!

    http://squaremans.com/the-2001-post/

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