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Tagged with “festival” (15)

  1. Very Quick And Very Slow - Voice Republic

    This is a talk about the durations that things happen at, from the nanosecond scale to the billions of years. Some of those things happen in videogames, but some don’t. I know this is a videogame conference, but I hope you’re okay with that.

    Source: http://amaze-berlin.de/ (http://amaze-berlin.de/)

    https://voicerepublic.com/talks/very-quick-and-very-slow

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  2. Tim O’Brien on transient stars and science and music festivals

    Tim O’Brien has earned the nickname ‘the awesome astrophysicist dude from Jodrell Bank’ He is Professor of Astrophysics at Manchester University, and the associate director of Jodrell Bank Observatory, best known for the giant, iconic radio dish of the world-famous Lovell telescope which sits majestically on the Cheshire plain, where he carries out research on the behaviour of transient binary stars called novae.

    For twenty-five years Tim O’Brien has been telling the public about astronomy, and recently he’s also become an organiser of concerts. Building on some very successful one-day events, the first Blue Dot Festival was held at Jodrell Bank in July 2016 and the second will be this summer. Tim talks to Jim al-Khalil about how he pops up on stage between acts to tell the audience about science - and doesn’t get bottled off!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08r1skf

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  3. Designing the future - Tech Weekly podcast

    We may not have jetpacks and flying cars, but artificial intelligence is taking ever greater strides.

    This week on the podcast we look one day into the future at some of the biggest technological designs of the next few years set to beam out of this year’s dConstruct Conference, part of the Brighton Digital festival.

    Joining Alex Hern on the panel is time traveller Ingrid Burrington who argues that the time machines of today don’t look like Deloreans, they look like NTP servers, real-time data streams and predictive models, Nick Foster an industrial designer working on future projects for google and Carla Diana who thinks that the robot takeover will start in our kitchens.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/sep/10/design-future-dconstruct-conference-brighton-tech-podcast

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  4. Kim Stanley Robinson In Conversation

    American science fiction writer, Kim Stanley Robinson, best known for his award winning "Mars" trilogy, joins Lucy Sussex at the Melbourne Writers Festival to discuss the inspiration for his work and the problems facing planet Earth.

    Robinson explains to his audience why it is important for everyone to know about science, especially in the face of the climate change crisis.

    It’s a subject very close to the author’s heart: virtually all of Robinson’s novels have an ecological component with sustainability being one of his major themes.

    Robinson also defends science fiction, believing it deserves more attention by literary awards such as the Booker Prize.

    After all, if one of his favourite authors Virginia Woolf was a science fiction fan, why can’t contemporary literary audiences appreciate the genre more?

    Kim Stanley Robinson is an American Science Fiction writer best known for the multi-award winning "Mars" trilogy.

    Other books include "The Years of Rice and Salt" and his latest book "Galileo’s Dream".

    In 2008 Kim Stanley Robinson was listed as the TIME "Hero of the Environment".

    Lucy Sussex is a New Zealand born writer, researcher and editor. Sussex has published many short stories and a few novels, including "The Scarlet Rider" which won the Ditmar, Best Novel in 1997. She currently writes a review column for "The West Australian" and "The Sunday Age".

    http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2010/10/12/3034904.htm

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  5. Robert Forster: Dancing About Architecture

    Robert Forster,musician, songwriter, music critic for The Monthly and co-founder of the iconic indie rock group, The Go Betweens, is in conversation with Sasha Frere-Jones, the pop critic with The New Yorker at the Melbourne Writers Festival.

    This is a prize eavesdrop: Frere-Jones loves Forster and The Go Betweens; Forster has a great openness and nerdiness and they both know a whole heap about music.

    This plain boy from Brisbane who didn’t even have a girlfriend when he was writing some of his best songs with Grant McLennan and wondering how he could compete with The Velvets – Lou Reed, John Cale, Nico, heroin and sado masochism – is an absolute treat in his deep brown suit and his long winding tale about meeting the woman of his dreams, actress Lee Remick.

    http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2012/10/22/3613737.htm

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  6. Tavi Gevinson: Tavi’s World

    Tavi Gevinson was 11 when she kicked off her writing career with a fashion blog called Style Rookie.

    She had smart, sharp observations on fashion and visual style and the usual girl things that an 11 year old is obsessed with and she had an audience. And it was big. They were pre-teens and teenagers who had someone from their cohort who spoke to them.

    Gevinson was soon reporting on Fashion Weeks in Paris, London and New York and quickly got up the noses of the fashion editors and style queens. Who was this upstart 11 year old?

    Your first response may be to immediately dislike someone this young…with talent; and you might immediately assume that she’s as obnoxious as some soapie star. You’d be wrong. Tavi is now 17. Though it’s 17 going on 48 or 50.

    She’s smart, witty, erudite, with a good line in self-deprecating patter.

    She was a keynote speaker at the Melbourne Writers Festival and she packed out the Athanaeum Theatre with young women wearing ‘Tavi headgear’ the bunches of roses that she used to wear when she was 11 or 12, and their mums and the odd dad.

    Here, she’s giving her ‘fangirl’ keynote speech.

    It’s worth taking a look at Rookie, her online magazine for young women.

    Estelle Tang is the breathless interviewer.

    http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2013/09/09/3840224.htm

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  7. Inside the Imagination of China Mieville

    China Miéville is probably the best new writer in the ‘new weird’ genre. He’s got a seriously prolific output and he manages to push the limits of fantasy, science fiction and horror to a very appreciative younger audience.

    He’s pulled together a whole bunch of skills: fantasy/science fiction writer; would be politician - he ran on the Socialist Alliance ticket for the UK general election in 2001 - and he did his Phd on Marxism and International Law at the London School of Economics. He also draws and writes comics.

    He could only be British.

    This conversation covers high surrealism, pulp modernism, H.P. Lovecraft, the Call of Cthulhu and a love of garbage, octopuses and trains.

    If you don’t read his books, your teenage children probably do…and love him.

    China is generous with questions from the audience – as he should be, they buy his books, but not every writer is; and he seriously addresses the basic structuring of his books in answer to a keen young fan. If you follow him on various blogs, you’ll notice that he seems very connected to his audience.

    Writer James Bradley is in conversation with him at the Perth Writers Festival, and they begin talking about his latest book, Railsea.

    http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2013/03/25/3719956.htm

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  8. Day of the Drones - Books and Authors - Browse - Big Ideas - ABC TV

    This panel examines the moral legitimacy of using drones as killing machines as well as for the surveillance of private citizens.

    http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2013/09/30/3856807.htm

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