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Tagged with “fashion” (5)

  1. Designing for the Future, pt 5: Wearables with Josh Clark and Liza Kindred | Fresh Tilled Soil

    This week we sit down with, newly married couple, Josh Clark and Liza Kindred about the future of wearables. We chat about a magic wand Josh made to control his stereo, Liza’s WIFI hotspot handbag, and blue-sky some ideas about what the future looks like without drumpants.

    http://www.freshtilledsoil.com/designing-for-the-future-pt-5-wearables-with-josh-clark-and-liza-kindred/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Personal aesthetics and internet culture: Put This On creators Jesse Thorn and Adam Lisagor

    Colin Marshall talks to Jesse Thorn and Adam Lisagor, creators of the new men’s style web series and blog Put This On, which explore all facets of the art of “dressing like a grown-up.” Thorn is also the host of Public Radio International’s The Sound of Young America as well as the comedy podcast Jordan Jesse Go; Lisagor is also a co-host and producer of the comedy podcast You Look Nice Today.

    http://colinmarshall.libsyn.com/personal_aesthetics_and_internet_culture_put_this_on_creators_jesse_thorn_and_adam_lisagor

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Lisa Jardine ponders the effect of recession on the lingerie industry … both today and in Tudor times.

    BBC, A Point of View: "The neck frill grew oversized, into the elaborate, face-framing ruffs which for many of us define late Tudor dress, as it features in any number of formal portraits of royalty and nobility. Starching these became a laundry skill in its own right - the very first specialist ruff-launderer in England is supposed to have been a Flemish woman, Mistress Dingen Van der Passe, who brought Dutch-standard starching to London in 1564. Detached ruffs and decorative cuffs were securely attached to the outer garments for each wearing, using metal pins. It has been suggested that in economic terms, these pins are the first genuinely disposable commodities of emerging consumer culture, since they were bought in bulk, used once and then discarded (though there are records of the more frugal having their bent pins straightened for re-use). Even without integral layered and embroidered neck-frills and cuffs, the amount of coloured embroidery on the upper part of shirt and smock continued to grow, transforming the simple undergarment into an object of beauty in its own right." Full text at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7689554.stm.

    —Huffduffed by adactio