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Tagged with “econtalk” (4)

  1. Tim Harford on Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy - Econlib

    Financial Times columnist and author Tim Harford talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Harford’s latest book, Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy. Highlights include how elevators are an important form of mass transit, why washing machines didn’t save quite as much time as you’d think, and the glorious illuminating aspects of light throughout history.

    http://www.econtalk.org/tim-harford-on-fifty-inventions-that-shaped-the-modern-economy/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. John McWhorter on the Evolution of Language and Words on the Move - Econlib

    How did bad come to mean good? Why is Shakespeare so hard to understand? Is there anything good about "like" and "you know?" Author and professor John McWhorter of Columbia University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the unplanned ways that English speakers create English, an example of emergent order. Topics discussed include how words get short (but not too short), the demand for vividness in language, and why Shakespeare is so hard to understand.

    http://www.econtalk.org/john-mcwhorter-on-the-evolution-of-language-and-words-on-the-move/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Abby Smith Rumsey on Remembering, Forgetting, and When We Are No More - Econlib

    You might think your tweets on Twitter belong to you. But in 2010, the Library of Congress acquired the entire archive of Twitter. Why would such a majestic library acquire such seemingly ephemeral material? Historian Abby Smith Rumsey, author of When We Are No More, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about this decision of the Library of Congress and the general challenge of how to cope with a world when so much of what we write and read is digital. Subjects discussed include what we can learn from the past, the power of collective memory, what is worth saving, and how we might archive our electronic lives so that we and those who come after us can find what we might be looking for.

    http://www.econtalk.org/abby-smith-rumsey-on-remembering-forgetting-and-when-we-are-no-more/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Rachel Laudan on the History of Food and Cuisine - Econlib

    Rachel Laudan, visiting scholar at the University of Texas and author of Cuisine and Empire, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the history of food. Topics covered include the importance of grain, the spread of various styles of cooking, why French cooking has elite status, and the reach of McDonald’s. The conversation concludes with a discussion of the appeal of local food and other recent food passions.

    http://www.econtalk.org/rachel-laudan-on-the-history-of-food-and-cuisine/

    —Huffduffed by adactio