adactio / tags / dystopia

Tagged with “dystopia” (8)

  1. Utopian science fictions legitimising our current dystopia – 2019 Taylor Lecture, Oxford University – Yanis Varoufakis

    The Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages, Oxford University, kindly invited me to deliver the 2019 Taylor Lecture on 12th February 2019. I chose the topic of Realistic Utopias versus Dystopic Realities – my aim being to highlight the manner in which really-existing capitalism is marketed as a utopian science fiction that has nothing to do with… really-existing capitalism. Behind this elegant utopian mathematical the powers-that-be hide a dismal dystopia that is failing humanity in a variety of ways. Plato, King Lear, Coriolanus and the Borg Queen make cameo appearances…

    https://www.yanisvaroufakis.eu/2019/02/19/utopian-science-fictions-legitimising-for-our-current-dystopia-2019-taylor-lecture-oxford-university/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Apocalypse, Now - On The Media - WNYC

    Science fiction has always been an outlet for our greatest anxieties. This week, we delve into how the genre is exploring the reality of climate change. Plus: new words to describe the indescribable.

    1. Jeff VanderMeer @jeffvandermeer, author of the Southern Reach Trilogy and Borne, on writing about the relationships between people and nature.

    2. Claire Vaye Watkins @clairevaye talks about Gold Fame Citrus, her work of speculative fiction in which an enormous sand dune threatens to engulf the southwest.

    3. Kim Stanley Robinson discusses his latest work, New York 2140. The seas have risen 50 feet and lower Manhattan is submerged. And yet, there’s hope.

    4. British writer Robert Macfarlane @RobGMacfarlane on new language for our changing world.

    Throughout the show: listeners offer their own new vocabulary for the Anthropocene era. Many thanks to everyone who left us voice memos!

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/on-the-media-2017-07-07/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Cory Doctorow with Edward Snowden: Dystopia, Apocalypse, and other Sunny Futures

    In Walkaway, Cory Doctorow imagines a world in which people are no longer needed by the super-rich and the clever machines that can print all of life’s basic necessities — food, clothing, shelter. The 99% might be obsolete, but they’re not going to take it lying down. They walk away, living on the exhaust stream and stolen code of the default world, surviving threats, and, ultimately, war. Doctorow, co-owner of Boing Boing, Activist in Residence at the MIT Media Lab and special consultant for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, will be joined virtually by Edward Snowden to discuss dystopian futures and the struggle between the haves and the have-nots in this special LIVE event.

    source: https://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2017/05/03/cory-doctorow

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/albill/cory-doctorow-with-edward-snowden-dystopia-apocalypse-and-other-sunny-futures
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 05 May 2017 03:17:01 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. dConstruct 2015: Matt Novak

    Jeremy chats to Matt Novak about past visions of the future, the Jetsons, the Apollo programme, and how great dConstruct 2015 is going to be.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Matt Novak is the editor of Gizmodo’s Paleofuture blog, which looks at past visions of the future. He explores the history of our most optimistic dreams and our most pessimistic fears by looking at everything from flying cars and utopian communities to overpopulation and complete societal collapse. His work is inspired by his private collection of retro-futuristic artifacts, including hundreds of vintage tech magazines, space age lunchboxes, 1980s videophones, among hundreds of other pieces. Matt started the Paleofuture blog independently in 2007 and it was later acquired by Smithsonian magazine in 2011 and then by Gawker Media in 2013. He currently lives in Los Angeles, a city which has about four years until it’s set to achieve the utopia depicted in the 1982 documentary Blade Runner.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/matt-novak

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Guardian Books podcast: The future —€“ dystopia or utopia?

    Will our future be happy? Will we control our technology or will it control us? Writers Nick Harkaway and Simon Ings warn that we should not accept everything on offer. Ben Marcus’s new dystopian novel imagines what might happen if it all goes wrong.

    We’re in an age when technological fact is stranger than fiction – so why are so many novelists devoting themselves to exploring the frontiers of thought? Nick Harkaway explains why it’s the novelist’s job to imagine the future, and how "an act of taking the brakes off the imagination" could even help the world to make the right choices as we hurtle into the future. Simon Ings, editor of Arc, a new magazine devoted to imagining the future, explains the importance of speculative thinking and the sadness of the modern world.

    And Ben Marcus talks about the worst case scenario of his new novel, The Flame Alphabet, which imagines a dystopian future where adults are poisoned by the speech of their children, and in which words and writing, and even making signs, also become fatal.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/audio/2012/jun/08/future-dystopia-utopia-books-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. KQED’s Forum: Margaret Atwood

    In Margaret Atwood’s new novel, a natural disaster has altered the earth and wiped out most human life. Two women survive, and "The Year of the Flood" is their story. We speak with the author about her career, the new book and what she thinks the future holds for our fragile planet.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. NEA’s The Big Read: Fahrenheit 451

    The National Endowment for the Arts presents a radio show about the classic Science Fiction novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. This episode is narrated by Dana Gioia and features Ray Bradbury, Orson Scott Card, John Crowley, Paquito D’Rivera, Hector Elizondo, Nat Hentoff, Ursula K. Le Guin, Azar Nafisi, Luis Alberto Urrea and Sam Weller.

    —Huffduffed by adactio