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Tagged with “drm” (10)

  1. Rethinking Technological Positivism with Cory Doctorow - CoRecursive Podcast

    Self-driving cars or armed autonomous military robots may make use of the same technologies. In a certain sense, we as software developers are helping to build and shape the future. What does the future look like and are we helping build the right one? Is technology a force for liberty or oppression.

    Cory Doctorow is one of my favorite authors and also a public intellectual with a keen insight into the dangers we face a society. In this interview, I ask him how to avoid ending up in a techno-totalitarian society. We also talk about Turing, DRM, data mining and monopolies.

    https://corecursive.com/33-cory-doctorow-digital-rights/

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  2. Cory Doctorow on legally disabling DRM (for good)

    The O’Reilly Security Podcast: The chilling effects of DRM, nascent pro-security industries, and the narrative power of machines.In this episode, I talk with Cory Doctorow, a journalist, activist, and science fiction writer.

    We discuss the EFF lawsuit against the U.S. government, the prospect for a whole new industry of pro-security businesses, and the new W3C DRM specification.Here are some highlights from our discussion around DRM:

    How to sue the government: Taking on the DCMA

    We [Electronic Frontier Foundation] are representing [Bunny Huang and Matthew Green] in a case that challenges the constitutionality of Section 1201 of the DMCA. The DMCA is this notoriously complicated copyright law, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, that was brought in in 1998. Section 1201 is the part that relates to bypassing digital rights management (DRM), or digital restrictions management as some people call it. The law says that it’s against the rules to bypass this, even for lawful purposes, and that it imposes very severe civil and criminal penalties. There’s a $500,000 fine and a five-year prison sentence for a first offense provided for in the statute. The law’s been on the books, obviously, for a very long time—since 1998. Given that all digital technology works by making copies, it’s hard to imagine a digital technology that can’t be used to infringe copyright; no digital technology would be legal.

    Recent changes add urgency

    A couple things changed in the last decade. The first is that the kinds of technologies that have access controls for copyrighted works have gone from these narrow slices (consoles and DVD players) to everything (the car in your driveway). If it has an operating system or a networking stack, it has a copyrighted work in it. Software is copyrightable, and everything has software. Therefore, manufacturers can invoke the DMCA to defend anything they’ve stuck a thin scrim of DRM around, and that defense includes the ability to prevent people from making parts. All they need to do is add a little integrity check, like the ones that have been in printers for forever, that asks, "Is this part an original manufacturer’s part, or is it a third-party part?" Original manufacturer’s parts get used; third-party parts get refused. Because that check restricts access to a copyrighted work, bypassing it is potentially a felony. Car manufacturers use it to lock you into buying original parts.

    This is a live issue in a lot of domains. It’s in insulin pumps, it’s in voting machines, it’s in tractors. John Deere locks up the farm data that you generate when you drive your tractor around. If you want to use that data to find out about your soil density and automate your seed broadcasting, you have to buy that data back from John Deere in a bundle with seed from big agribusiness consortia like Monsanto, who license the data from Deere. This metastatic growth is another big change. It’s become really urgent to act now because, in addition to this consumer rights dimension, your ability to add things to your device, take it for independent service, add features, and reconfigure it are all subject to approval from manufacturers.

    How this impacts security

    All of this has become a no-go zone for security researchers. In the last summer, the Copyright Office entertained petitions for people who have been impacted by Section 1201 of the DMCA. Several security researchers filed a brief saying they had discovered grave defects in products as varied as voting machines, insulin pumps and cars, and they were told by their counsel that they couldn’t disclose because, in so doing, they would reveal information that might help someone bypass DRM, and thus would face felony prosecution and civil lawsuits.

    When copyright overrides the First Amendment

    There are some obvious problems with copyright and free speech. Copyright is a government monopoly over who can use certain combinations of words or pictures, or convey certain messages in specific language, all of which seems to conflict with First Amendment rights. In both the Eldred and Golan cases, the Supreme Court said the reason copyright is constitutional, the reason the First Amendment doesn’t trump copyright, is that copyright has these escape valves. One is fair use. The other is what’s called the traditional contours of copyright, which determine what is and isn’t copyrightable (i.e., copyright only covers expressions and not ideas, copyright doesn’t cover non-creative works, and so on). But the DRM situation is urgent. Because DRM can be used to restrict fair use, because it can trump the traditional contours, and because it has criminal penalties, we were able to bring a challenge against it. When there are criminal penalties, you don’t have to wait for someone to sue you. You can sue the government.

    Related resources:

    EFF is suing the US government to invalidate the DMCA’s DRM provisions (BoingBoing)

    America’s broken digital copyright law is about to be challenged in court (The Guardian)

    1201 complaint in full

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/cory-doctorow-on-legally-disabling-drm-for-good

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  3. Cory Doctorow on losing the open Web

    The O’Reilly Hardware Podcast: Digital rights management goes deeper into the Web.In this episode of the Hardware podcast, we talk with writer and digital rights activist Cory Doctorow. He’s recently rejoined the Electronic Frontier Foundation to fight a World Wide Web Consortium proposal that would add DRM to the core specification for HTML. When we recorded this episode with Cory, the W3C had just overruled the EFF’s objection. The result, he says, is that “we are locking innovation out of the Web.”“It is illegal to report security vulnerabilities in a DRM,” Doctorow says. “[DRM] is making it illegal to tell people when the devices they depend upon for their very lives are unsuited for that purpose.”

    In our “Tools” segment, Doctorow tells us about tools that can be used for privacy and encryption, including the EFF surveillance self-defense kit, and Wickr, an encrypted messaging service that allows for an expiration date on shared messages and photos. “We need a tool that’s so easy your boss can use it,” he says.

    Other links:

    In 2014, Nest bought Revolv, maker of a smart home hub. Now Nest is shutting down Revolv’s cloud service, and in the process it’s bricking every Revolv hub that’s already been sold. Consumers may own their hardware, but if it depends on cloud software to run, it operates at someone else’s whim.

    Mark Klein, an AT&T technician who filed a whistleblower suit against AT&T for allowing the National Security Administration to tap into its lines.

    EFF’s Apollo 1201 project, aimed at eradicating DRM

    Simply Secure, a non-profit privacy and security organization of which Doctorow has recently joined the board

    DanKam, an augmented-reality application written by security researcher Dan Kaminsky that helps people who experience colorblindness. It’s an example of a legitimate project that requires the ability to break DRM.

    This week’s click spirals:

    David Cranor: The war among players in the online game Eve Online, including a recent economic insurrection by some players against the game runners.

    Jon Bruner: A game design competition based on Robert Caro’s classic biography The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York, about the legendary urban planner.

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/cory-doctorow-on-losing-the-open-web

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  4. Shut Your Analog Hole - The New Disruptors - Mule Radio Syndicate

    Cory Doctorow (@doctorow) is a essayist, novelist, blogger, and co-editor of BoingBoing, and he is exhausting. The man is a production machine, churning out excellent book after excellent book as if writing were a job instead of something to agonize and procrastinate over. As of this writing, his latest books are Homeland and Pirate Cinema, and, with Charlie Stross, he wrote Rapture of the Nerds. Cory has also long been an advocate for the personal ownership of culture, demanding corporations and governments keep their hands off what we make and their noses out of our individual use and modification of media and hardware. To that end, he has fought endless wars against restrictive legislation.

    Websites we mention: Cory worked for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), a non-profit that defends individual rights and freedoms. Cory was part of the Humble Ebook Bundle, which put together several science fiction and fantasy books into a single name-your-price bundle in which the buyer chose how much of their payment went to authors and how much to three charities. Amazon has a price-matching arrangement when authors pick a 70%-royalty arrangement that allows them to match the lowest ebook price anywhere on the Net for any book they sell for Kindle. BookScan tracks retail sales through integration with point-of-sale and online sales systems. My father and I run Books & Writers, a book-rank tracking service. Amazon has provided BookScan data to authors who register with them. At least one book distributor in 1996 was relying on IBM’s PROFS on a mainframe. Cory documented in painstaking detail how his With a Little Help story collection was funded and produced. Artist friends created a set of four covers for print editions so that one could choose among them. The book was designed by John D. Berry, a friend of mine and one of the world’s best typographers. (His wife is Eileen Gunn, a science-friend and incubator of science-fiction writers.) There’s a difference between the barter economy and the gift economy, and Cory explains the distinction. Andy Baio, who is part of the life’s blood of creativity on the Internet, released Kind of Bloop, a collection of 8-bit music, that had an homage of a famous Miles Davis photo as part of the cover. Despite it rather obviously being precisely within the reasonable confines of transformative work, it would have required exensive litigation. Andy settled to avoid destroying his family finances. The partly crowdfunded movie Stripped had a second round of money raising to cover the clearance rights for some of the copyrighted material the filmmakers wanted to include. Cory pointed out that the Stanford Center for Internet and Society can help a filmmaker who wants to assert fair-use rights over material obtain the errors and omissions insurance required to have a film shown in a theater and released in other ways. Ursula K. LeGuin likely wouldn’t have a found a publisher who would have been willing to let her quote from The Beatles’ “A Little Help from My Friends” today, a critical component of her The Lathe of Heaven. In fact, the 1980 PBS movie of the book couldn’t be re-released for many years because of both negotiating with the original cast and crew, and obtaining rights. The Beatles’ original version of the song was replaced with a cover in the re-release. (Cory notes that LeGuin doesn’t like fair use of her own work.) Aereo is a Barry Diller-controlled company that is selling access to tiny HDTV antennas over the Internet to skirt rules about re-broadcasting. It’s clever. So clever that a dissenting judge in an appeals panel was rather unhappy about it. Fox filed takedown notices under the DMCA for Cory’s book Homeland on various sites asserting it was the rightsholder, as opposed to being the rightsholder for its TV series Homeland. Jaron Lanier once told tales of virtual-reality goggles and the future. He now tells different stories. The Infocom Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (H2G2) game may still be played. The Incomparable podcast did an episode on Infocom games. Sony once infected computers with a rootkit to manage copy protection for its music CDs. The software hid itself and degraded Windows, and it took a long while for Sony to tell the truth and make amends. Defibrillators can be easily hacked. The Analog Reconversion Discussion Group was formed to plug the “analog hole,” which was a way to copy digital playback through an analog output. Scott Turow wrote a spectacularly uninformed and self-serving Op-Ed in the New York Times that conflated a number of different factors, mostly specious and relatively absurd, about how authors were getting a squeeze on royalties. The issue at hand was the Supreme Court allowing the importation of foreign editions of books. Such editions may be sold cheaply abroad, but also are often made more cheaply and thus not as appealing to American buyers. Turow is head of the Author’s Guild, which purports to speak for all authors, but only a tiny number of writers belong relative to all published authors. (I used to.) The Registrar of Copyrights may approve temporary and limited exemptions to the DMCA, but these are reviewed every three years. RealDVD got pulled from the market by RealNetworks in order to avoid disturbing studio partners. Kaleidescape makes servers that let users rip CDs, DVDs, and Blu-Ray and then space shift them around a house. “No, that’s just perfectly normal paranoia, everyone in the universe has that.” Many people who are competent suffer from Imposter Syndrome. A comic came out after Cory and I spoke about the day jobs of poets.

    http://www.muleradio.net/newdisruptors/24/

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  5. Margaret Atwood | The Publishing Pie: An Author’s View

    Author Margaret Atwood, creator of fictional dystopias, speaks on the plight of the author in the face of changes to the publishing industry today. She takes it down to first principles, in a partly historic, partly autobiographical way, how the "publishing pie" is divided. She warns the publishing industry against eliminating the author’s piece of the pie in their mad rush to an electronic publishing future.

    Author Margaret Atwood is not as "hopped up" as some people may be about digital publishing. "If everything will be available on the internet, and everything on the internet is potentially free, who is going to pay for the cheese sandwiches?" she asks. In her delightfully wry presentation, Atwood reminds us that only ten percent of authors make a living on their writing, and traditionally an entire industry of printers, publishers, and booksellers , not to mention others, do make a living from book handling. "Helpful industry hint: Never eliminate your primary source," she says.

    "Every tool has three sides. the sharp side, the dull side, and the stupid side, the side you did not intend," Atwood says about the changes wrought by the digital age. On the one hand, she says, we are overwhelmed by the number of things we could read. But eBooks are increasing readership, but not author’s pay.

    According to an analysis by the Author’s Guild, author’s royalties on ebooks is shrinking the author’s piece of the book revenue pie. Yet the new freedom in self-publishing is turning the publishing model on its head. Atwood cites the case of her friend, YA author Mark Jeffrey, who gave away 2.4 million ebooks, then continued to raise his profile on Lulu and iTunes before winning a traditional publishing deal.

    Margaret Atwood has received numerous awards and honourary degrees. She is the author of more than thirty-five volumes of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and non-fiction and is perhaps best known for her novels, including The Handmaid’s Tale (1983), The Robber Bride (1994), Alias Grace (1996), The Blind Assassin, which won the prestigious Booker Prize in 2000; and Oryx and Crake, 2003. The Tent (mini-fictions) and Moral Disorder (short stories) both appeared in 2006. Her most recent volume of poetry, The Door, was published in 2007. Her non-fiction book, Payback: Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth, part of the Massey Lecture series, appeared in 2008, and her most recent novel, The Year of the Flood, in 2009

    http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4862.html

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  6. A Conversation with Ray Kurzweil and Tim O’Reilly

    Ray Kurzweil has spent most of his life imagining what the future might be like, and then inventing it. In this keynote from 2010, Kurzweil shares his vision of the future with Tim O’Reilly, founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media. The interview begins with a discussion about the Blio, the future of digital publishing, and finally the Singularity. This interview precedes the September 2010 release of the Blio, a TTS-enabled, full-color, web-enabled eReader.

    As you listen to every word of this interview, you will become amazed at how dynamic and competitive the technology market has become. In this keynote from 2010, Kurzweil shares his vision of that market with Tim O’Reilly, founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media. Kurzweil begins by sharing his take on the future of publishing, starting with the Blio eReader that Kurzweil helped develop.

    Kurzweil has long been a pioneer and champion of enabling technologies for the blind and sight-impaired, having created the first "Reading Machine." These technologies paired optical scanning and the text-to-speech synthesizer to open up entire new perspectives. Kurzweil believes that the Blio continues that trend by incorporating TTS technology along with a broad approach to accessibility.

    O’Reilly and Kurzweil discuss the possibilities and dangers inherent in various digital publishing pay structures, and the handling of DRM at various strengths. Kurzweil suggests per-page and per-minute pay structures. The eReader may change the form factor of texts, as the use of YouTube has reduced the typical video length to less than five minutes. A plethora of free material puts demands on the means of sorting out what is most interesting to read to any one reader.

    Kurzweil takes us on a wild ride through the development of technology in general, on the steep sloping rollercoaster of Moore’s Law, where exponentially-increasing technological advances are met with exponentially falling market prices. Finally, Kurzweil talks about the Singularity and the pace of technology, in the context of the status of the book as a repository of human knowledge.

    Ray Kurzweil, currently CEO of K-NFB Reading Technology (creator of the Blio e-reader), and Kurzweil Technologies, Inc., invented the first CCD flat-bed scanner, the first omni-font optical character recognition, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano, and the first commercially marketed large-vocabulary speech recognition. Ray’s latest book, The Singularity is Near, was a New York Times best seller.

    http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4861.html

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  7. Michael Geist: Why Copyright? presentation

    "Why Copyright?" is the central question in locating the importance of copyright within larger political debates — what are the impacts of copyright reform on art, creativity and culture? What are the impacts of copyright regulation on the future of the internet and other mobile technologies? What are the larger issues of digital advocacy inspired by current copyright debates? And finally, what are possible repercussions on online public forums and governance?

    Answered in four parts by Dr. Geist, the fate of creativity and cultural preservation, and a more general address of how Canadians can access, use and share knowledge serves to counter common arguments in the media couched in issues of illegal downloading through peer-to-peer networks, digital locks, and software piracy.

    From http://www.cjc-online.ca/index.php/journal/multimedia/view/1

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  8. Everyone Hates DRM

    The Intellectual Property Colloquium, a podcast for lawyers, has a one-hour show up about the reasons that DRM is the most reviled consumer technology in the market today. It includes interviews with Ed Felten and Randy Picker, testimony from the FTC’s DRM hearings, and is hosted by UCLA Law’s Doug Lichtman. Fascinating listening that makes a good stab at unpicking the tech and the law of DRM.

    From: http://www.boingboing.net/2009/04/24/lawyer-podcast-on-ev.html

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  9. The DRM Sausage Factory

    A chapter from "Content: Selected Essays on Technology, Creativity, Copyright and the Future of the Future" by Cory Doctorow. Read by Jan Rubak.

    Official Website of the Book: http://craphound.com/content/

    The entire text of the book is available in various formats for free download from http://craphound.com/content/download/, or for purchase at your favourite bookstore for US$14.95 (ISBN: 978-1-892391-81-0).

    From http://www.archive.org/details/CoryDoctorow-Content_268

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