adactio / tags / discovery

Tagged with “discovery” (7)

  1. Can Robots be Truly Intelligent?

    From Skynet and the Terminator franchise, through Wargames and Ava in Ex Machina, artificial intelligences pervade our cinematic experiences. But AIs are already in the real world, answering our questions on our phones and making diagnoses about our health. Adam Rutherford asks if we are ready for AI, when fiction becomes reality, and we create thinking machines.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0548s57

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  2. BBC World Service - Discovery, The Feynman Variations

    Brian Cox presents a tribute to Richard Feynman.

    Widely regarded as the finest physicist of his generation and the most influential since Einstein, Feynman did much to popularise science, through lectures, books and television, not least his revelation at a press conference in which he demonstrated the exact cause of the Challenger Shuttle explosion in 1986.

    Described as the ‘Mozart of physics’, Feynman’s amazing life and career seemingly had no end of highlights.

    A student at MIT and then Princeton (where he obtained an unprecedented perfect score on the entrance exam for maths and physics), he was drafted onto the Manhattan Project as a junior scientist.

    There his energy and talents made a significant mark on two of the project’s leaders, Robert Oppenheimer and Hans Bethe.

    The latter would become Feynman’s lifelong mentor and friend.

    Bethe called his student "a magician", setting him apart from other scientists as ‘no ordinary genius’.

    In 1965, Feynman shared a Nobel Prize for his unique contribution to the field of Quantum Electrodynamics making him the most celebrated, influential and best known American Physicist of his generation

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00b6djp

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  3. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Voyages of James Cook

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the scientific advances made in the three voyages of Captain James Cook, from 1768 to 1779. Cook’s voyages astonished Europeans, bringing back detailed knowledge of the Pacific and its people, from the Antarctic to the Bering Straits. This topic is one of more than a thousand different ideas suggested by listeners in October and came from Alysoun Hodges in the UK, Fiachra O’Brolchain in Ireland, Mhairi Mackay in New Zealand, Enzo Vozzo in Australia, Jeff Radford in British Columbia and Mark Green in Alaska.

    With

    Simon Schaffer Professor of the History of Science at the University of Cambridge

    Rebekah Higgitt Lecturer in the History of Science at the University of Kent

    And

    Sophie Forgan Retired Principle Lecturer at the University of Teesside Chairman of Trustees of the Captain Cook Museum, Whitby

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06qkrks

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  4. Yuri Gagarin — space flight anniversary on BBC Discovery

    Yuri Gagarin was the first spaceman. This week’s special is an hour long special on that epic mission 50 years ago.

    Each week, Discovery takes an in-depth look at the most significant ideas, discoveries and trends in science, from the smallest microbe to the furthest corner of space.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/discovery

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  5. Darwin’s Very Bad Day: ‘Oops, We Just Ate It!’

    When young Charles Darwin set out on the Beagle, near the top of his wish list was a rare and coveted bird: the lesser rhea, a South American version of the ostrich. The bird had been sighted by a French rival — but never caught. Darwin wanted to be the first to snatch the prize for Britain. And he did find the bird, just not in the shape he was expecting.

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