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Tagged with “disaster” (9)

  1. Deflecting Disaster

    Filmmakers and novelists love asteroids, especially if they’re heading for Earth.

    ttps://www.nasa.gov/mediacast/jpl/season-two-episode-4-deflecting-disaster

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. The Challenger Disaster

    It wasn’t an accident. Mike tells Sarah how the infamous space shuttle disaster came to be seen as a white-collar crime. Digressions include the Donner Party, George Lucas and “Jurassic Park.” Both co-hosts are audibly recovering from colds.

    https://rottenindenmark.wordpress.com/2019/01/03/the-challenger-disaster/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Gimlet Creative | Good Design is Human | Gimlet Creative

    “How do we design systems that support people and humanity, as opposed to just getting the job done? ”

    —Irene Au

    From airplane crashes, to industrial disasters and medical error: When things go terribly wrong, why do we blame human beings instead of bad design?

    https://creative.gimletmedia.com/episode/good-design-human-centric/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Science Weekly podcast: how to rebuild our world from scratch

    Astrophysicist and author Lewis Dartnell reveals why he has written The Knowledge, a handy guide for post-Apocalypse survivors

    http://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2014/mar/31/science-weekly-podcast-knowledge-rebuild-world-scratch-lewis-dartnell

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. The Knowledge: How to Rebuild our World from Scratch by Lewis Dartnell

    Maybe an asteroid hit Earth. Perhaps a nuclear war reduced our cities to radioactive rubble. Or avian flu killed most of the population. Whatever the cause, the world as we know it has ended and now the survivors must start again. But how do we set about rebuilding our world from scratch?

    Once you’ve salvaged what you can from the debris, how do you grow food and make clothes? How do you generate energy and develop medicines? And once you’ve mastered the essentials, how do you smelt metals, make gunpowder, or build a primitive radio set?

    The Knowledge is a guidebook for survivors. We have become disconnected not only from the beautiful fundamentals of science and technology but even from the basic skills and knowledge on which our lives and our world depend.

    The Knowledge is a journey of discovery, a book which explains everything you need to know about everything. Here is the blueprint for rebooting civilisation.

    It will transform your understanding of the world – and help you prepare for when it’s no longer here.

    http://lewisdartnell.com/en-gb/2013/11/the-knowledge-how-to-rebuild-our-world-from-scratch/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Irwin Redlener on surviving a nuclear attack

    The face of nuclear terror has changed since the Cold War, but disaster-medicine expert Irwin Redlener reminds us the threat is still real. He looks at some of history’s farcical countermeasures and offers practical advice on how to survive an attack.

    About Irwin Redlener

    Dr. Irwin Redlener spends his days imagining the worst: He studies how humanity might survive natural or human-made disasters of unthinkable severity.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/irwin_redlener_warns_of_nuclear_terrorism.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Forgotten tragedy: The loss of HMT Lancastria | The National Archives

    On 17 June 1940, HMT Lancastria was sunk by a German bomber while evacuating troops from St Nazaire; over 9,000 troops were packed on board. The exact number of soldiers who died that day will never be known, though even the lowest estimates rank this as the worst British maritime disaster in history, with losses exceeding those of the Titanic and Lusitania combined. This talk attempts to explain why so many who were lost will never be accounted for.

    http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/podcasts/loss-of-lancastria.htm

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  8. Titanic: the official story | The National Archives

    Using documents from The National Archives, James Cronan will take you through the history of the ship, from its construction and launch to its fateful end. James Cronan is a records specialist in diplomatic and colonial records. His interest in all things Titanic stems from the fact that his great-grandfather was a crewman on board the stricken ship. He has worked at The National Archives for 17 years, at Chancery Lane, the Family Records Centre and Kew.

    http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/podcasts/titanic-the-official-story.htm

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Quirks & Quarks - 10 Ways the World Could End

    Despite what you may think, the universe is not necessarily a friendly place. Sure, things here on Earth have been pretty stable over the past few millennia, allowing human civilization to gain a foothold. But that could change at any time. Disaster lurks everywhere, from the deepest reaches of space to the very bowels of our planet. We’ve recruited nine prominent Canadian scientists (and one science fiction writer) and asked them to imagine how they think the world might end.

    —Huffduffed by adactio