adactio / tags / devices

Tagged with “devices” (14)

  1. The Digital Human: Haunted

    Aleks Krotoski asks if we are haunted by our technology, or are we haunting it?

    So much of our experience of technology can feel a bit like being haunted. It starts like any good ghost story with the just mildly unsettling; things aren’t were you left them or seem to have moved on their own within our devices. Its a creepy feeling that leaves you unsure about what to believe. Our understanding of how much of technology works is so limited that when it starts to behave out of the ordinary we have no explanation. This is when we start to make very peculiar judgement’s; "why did you do that" we plead, as if some hidden force was at work.

    For some these feelings of being haunted by our technology can develop into full blown apparitions; keen gamers frequently experience Game transfer Phenomena where they literally see images of their game play in the real world, an involuntary augmented reality. While the hallucinations aren’t necessarily distressing in themselves the experiences can leave individuals questioning their sanity.

    The coming internet of things will bring problems of its own; smart locks that mysteriously open by themselves for example as if under the influence of some poltergeist. Aleks herself has had the experience of digital ‘gas lighting’ (a term drawn from an Ingrid Bergman movie of a woman being driven mad by husband) when her partner logged on to their home automation system remotely and started to mess with the lights while Aleks was home alone. As one commentator puts it in a reworking of the old Arthur C. Clarke quote "any sufficiently advanced hacking is indistinguishable from haunting."

    And as our devices and appliances increasingly start talking to each other bypassing us altogether who’s to say we, like Nicole Kidman’s character in The Others, haven’t become the ghost in the machine.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b080t0p9

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Tom Coates on conversational devices

    The O’Reilly Bots Podcast: Conversational interfaces for the Internet of Things.

    In this episode of the O’Reilly Bots Podcast, I speak with Tom Coates, co-founder of Thington, a service layer for the Internet of Things. Thington provides a conversational, messaging-like interface for controlling devices like lights and thermostats, but it’s also conversational at a deeper level: its very architecture treats the interactions between different devices like a conversation, allowing devices to make announcements to any other device that cares to listen.Coates explains how Thington operates in a way analogous to social media; in fact, he calls it “a Twitter for devices.” Just as people engage with each other in a commons, devices chat with each other in Thington’s messaging commons. He also discusses the value of human-readable output and the challenges involved in writing human-understandable scripts.

    Other links:

    Coates’ blog post “The Shape of Things,” an overview of how connected devices will communicate with humans

    Google Translate’s interlingua

    The O’Reilly Artificial Intelligence conference, June 27-29, 2017, in New York

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/tom-coates-on-conversational-devices

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. RWD Podcast Episode 41 : Peter-Paul Koch — Responsive Web Design

    This week I’m joined by Peter-Paul Koch of quirksmode.org fame. We talk about a conference PPK is co-organising, the state of the mobile device browsers, and perhaps decide that the web needs to creep along rather than streak ahead of come to a standstill. I thoroughly enjoyed this chat and I’m sure you will too.

    https://responsivedesign.is/podcasts/rwd-podcast-episode-41-peter-paul-koch

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. dConstruct 2015: Josh Clark

    Jeremy talks to Josh Clark about technology, magic, Harry Potter and the internet of things.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Josh Clark is the founder of Big Medium, a design agency specializing in connected devices, mobile experiences, and responsive web design. His clients include Samsung, Alibaba, eBay, AOL, Entertainment Weekly, Time Inc, JCrew, O’Reilly Media, and many others. Josh wrote “Tapworthy: Designing Great iPhone Apps” (O’Reilly, 2010) and the forthcoming “Designing for Touch” (A Book Apart, 2015). He speaks around the world about what’s next for digital interfaces.

    Before the internet swallowed him up, Josh was a producer of national PBS programs at Boston’s WGBH. He shared his three words of Russian with Mikhail Gorbachev, strolled the ranch with Nancy Reagan, hobnobbed with Rockefellers, and wrote trivia questions for a primetime game show. In 1996, he created the uberpopular “Couch-to-5K” (C25K) running program, which has helped millions of skeptical would-be exercisers take up jogging. (His motto is the same for fitness as it is for software user experience: no pain, no pain.)

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/josh-clark

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Aaron Gustafson & Jenn Lukas – Cross-device Adaptive Design » UIE Brain Sparks

    Responsive web design is widely regarded as a must when designing for multiple devices. With just one code base, instead of multiple sites, you can more efficiently make use of your resources. But, how your design looks is only a piece of the overall experience for a user. Having it be able to adapt to different browsers and technology can fully round out the interaction.

    Aaron Gustafson describes adaptive design as layering on the experience. He likens it to a peanut M&M. At the core is a peanut, which is a perfectly acceptable snack. But after layering on chocolate and then a candy shell, it arguably becomes a much more enjoyable experience. Just as on the web, if you have a more capable browser that can support the latest in CSS and HTML. you’ll get a richer experience. But even at its core, your site should work on more stripped down devices.

    Jenn Lukas has noticed that some companies have gone “all-in” on a technology or approach in the past and that ends up making things more difficult in the long run. If, for instance, they’ve invested heavily in Flash or JavaScript it could literally be impossible to reach potential users. Another consideration is speed. If you have a really heavy website, load times on cellular networks could be creating painful experiences for users.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2015/01/26/aaron-gustafson-jenn-lukas-cross-device-adaptive-design/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Design for how the world should work

    As the Internet is increasingly embedded into our physical world, it’s important to start designing for physical and intentional interactions with interfaces to supplement the passive, data-gathering interactions — designing smart devices that service us in the background, but upon which we also can exert our will.

    In this episode, Josh Clark (in an interview) and Tim O’Reilly (in a keynote) both address the importance of designing for contextual awareness and physical interaction. Clark stresses that we’re not facing a challenge of technology, but a challenge of imagination. O’Reilly argues that we’re not paying enough attention to the aspects of people and time in designing the Internet of Things, and that the entire system in which we operate is the user interface — as we design this new world, we must think about user needs first.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. ModevUX Preview: Josh Clark Goes Deep on Human Interaction Design

    It’s always awesome to get to chat with Josh Clark.  You might know him from his top selling book, Tapworthy, but Josh is also a veteran lecturer and the driving force behind Global Moxie—a creative agency working with some of today’s biggest industry innovators.

    Josh stopped by the Modev podcast for a great chat—that started out about his two upcoming talks happening at ModevUX May 19-20, but quickly turned into a great conversation about the Internet of Things, human interaction design, privacy, and more, including:

    Josh’s work redesigning for media giants like Time, AOL, eBay, Entertainment Weekly, and TechCrunch

    New digital-meets-physical innovations in healthcare, including his recent work with Asthmapolis

    What we mean by passive vs. intentional interaction in design

    How we eventually, more intuitively manipulate smart objects from a distance (HINT: it’s about the object, not simply bolting on technology)

    Who some of the leaders are in the digital-meets-physical revolution

    The ongoing evolution of device-to-device technologies, designing for good, and privacy concerns

    What we mean by ‘software is political.’

    Give it a listen and let us know what you think! You can get us anytime at hello@gomodev.com

    Josh will be leading a 3-hour workshop – Designing for Touch – on May 19 at ModevUX and will be back on May 20 to deliver our closing keynote.

    Join us at the Hilton Tysons Corner in McLean, VA! Save 20% on your registration with code MODEV.

    http://gomodev.com/modevux-preview-josh-clark-human-interaction-design/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. The coming war on general purpose computing - Future Tense - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Sci-fi author and digital rights activist Cory Doctorow talks about a coming ‘war on general purpose computing’, which could have far reaching consequences for our society.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/the-coming-war-on-general-purpose-computing-v2/5117100

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Karen McGrane’s Closing Plenary at IA Summit 2013

    The IA Summit closing plenary tradition started in 2005 as a way to bring the Summit to an end withan inquisitive session looking to the future of our practice and practitioners. The selection criteria for the closing plenary speaker is simple but important: an interesting voice from within our community with something meaningful to say about the direction of the practice.

    http://library.iasummit.org/podcasts/closing-plenary-2/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

Page 1 of 2Older