adactio / tags / danny hillis

Tagged with “danny hillis” (4)

  1. Brian Eno, Danny Hillis: The Long Now, now

    Make the next legal U-turn

    "Bitching Betty," they call the robotic voice of the car’s GPS guidance system.

    Eno and Hillis, on their road trips, always become so engrossed in conversation that they get lost—one time, driving to Monterey they wound up in Sacramento, 200 miles wrong.

    So they turn on GPS, and Betty joins the conversation with helpful advice about U-turns.

    Hillis observed, "The GPS is very good at giving you instructions to get someplace.

    But Brian and I have no idea where we’re going; we just want some time together.

    What usually happens for us after a couple days of frustratingly looking at the tiny GPS map is that we stop and buy a big paper map.

    And the moment we open a map of Nevada or Arizona, it feels like we’re in a much bigger world.

    The big maps are not that useful to navigate by, but there’s a sense of relief of seeing the bigger context and all the possibilities of where we might go.

    That’s exactly what The Long Now Foundation is for."

    Culture is a long conversation, Eno proposed.

    "When I talk about the practice of art I often use the word "conversation" because I think that you never see a piece of art on its own.

    You look at a painting in relation to the whole conversation of paintings.

    Some things are completely meaningless outside of that kind of context.

    if you think about Kazimir Malevich’s "White on White" painting, it’s hardly a picture actually, but it’s an important picture in the history of painting up to that point."

    Hillis replied, "My plan for painting is to have my bones removed and replaced with titanium, and then I grind up my bones to make white pigment."

    Eno: "That’s very old-fashioned."

    Hillis talked about the long-term stories we live by and how our expectations of the future shape the future, such as our hopes about space travel.

    Eno said that Mars is too difficult to live on, so what’s the point, and Hillis said, "That’s short-term thinking.

    There are three big game-changers going on: globalization, computers, and synthetic biology.

    (If I were a grad student now, I wouldn’t study computer science, I’d study synthetic biology.)

    I probably wouldn’t want to live on Mars in this body, but I could imagine adapting myself so I would want to live on Mars.

    To me it’s pretty inevitable that Earth is just our starting point."

    Eno remarked, "Sex, drugs, art, and religion—those are all activities in which you deliberately lose yourself.

    You stop being you and you let yourself become part of something else.

    You surrender control.

    I think surrendering is a great gift that human beings have.

    One of the experiences of art is relearning and rehearsing surrender properly.

    And one of the values perhaps of immersing yourself in very long periods of time is losing the sense of yourself as a single focus of the universe and seeing yourself as one small dot on this long line reaching out to the edges of time in each direction."

    Hillis described some elements of surrender designed in to the visitor experience of the 10,000-year Clock being built in the mountains of west Texas.

    "You’ll be away from your usual environment for days to travel to the remote site.

    Because of where it is on the mountain, you have to wake up before dawn, and there’s the physical exertion of climbing up the mountain.

    As you climb, there’s some points of confusion, where you’re not sure if you’re in the right place.

    "For example, in the total darkness inside the mountain, as you go up the spiral stairs surrounding the Clock mechanism for hundreds of feet, you think you know where you’re going because there’s light at the top of the shaft that you’re climbing toward, but as you get up there, the stairs keep becoming narrower, and you see they’re tapering off to smaller than you could possibly walk on.

    And you realize, ‘My plan isn’t going to work.’

    "You have to get away from the idea of direct progress and surrender that kind of control in order to find your way."

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02014/jan/21/long-now-now/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. 10,000 Year Clock Challenges Approach To Time : NPR

    In this final interview in our series of conversations about the future, Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep talks to Danny Hillis, a scientist and engineer and the inventor of a clock designed to last 10,000 years. The clock is meant to encourage people to think about the long-range future; the "long now" as Hillis calls it.

    http://www.npr.org/2013/12/31/258548386/10-000-year-old-clock-challenges-approach-to-time

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. The Interview Project - Hans Obrist & Danny Hillis

    When we think of cultural artifacts, we often think of objects – a painting, a book, or a Clock. But perhaps not all artifacts take tangible form: can the ideas that inspired such objects be considered cultural artifacts, too? And if so, how can we save these for future generations?

    Hans Ulrich Obrist answers that first question with a resounding ‘yes’ – and offers an answer to that second one, as well. The swiss-born curator and art historian has been working on a project of cultural preservation – but rather than collect objects, he is capturing ideas as they materialize in conversation. Part art project, part oral history, and part exercise in the workings of memory, the Interview Project is an effort “to preserve the voices of the world’s artists and innovative thinkers of the last 50 years in a digital archive.”

    Through a series of “sustained conversations” with influential figures from the worlds of art, science, and culture, Obrist seeks to do more than just document the important ideas that drive today’s culture: he hopes to capture their dynamic and transformative nature. Focusing on how ideas are born and recreated through dialogue, the Interview Project explores the role of time, evolution, and global connections in shaping human culture and innovation.

    As part of this project, Obrist recently interviewed Danny Hillis, co-chair of the Long Now Foundation’s board of directors. In a public event organized in conjunction with the Institute for the 21st Century, a Los Angeles-based initiative that works to archive Obrist’s interviews, he and Hillis spoke about the ideas that inspired Long Now’s 10,000-year clock, and the cultural evolution it hopes to encourage.

    Discussing the convergence of science, technology, and art, their conversation (which you can listen to here) illustrates that no cultural artifact emerges in a vacuum. New ideas are born from those that came before, and go on to inspire others in return. Culture is carried by, and created through, the dynamic exchange of conversation. “Knowing something is so 20th century,” says Hillis in the interview, speaking about the pre-internet age, in which a person’s knowledge was the sum of what his memory could hold. Today more than ever, in a world where billions of bits of digital information can be accessed at the tap of a finger, human knowledge and culture reside in our global network of exchange. And just as Hillis’ Connection Machine proved that linking processors together can transform the capability of computers, so can the connection of ideas produce unprecedented opportunities for new cultural creation. The Clock of the Long Now grew from the convergence of ideas that inspired its creators, and will hopefully contribute to the development of many new ideas and directions in the future.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. The Coming Entanglement: Bill Joy and Danny Hillis: Scientific American Podcast

    Digital innovators Bill Joy, co-founder of Sun Microsystems, and Danny Hillis, co-founder of the Long Now Foundation, talk with Scientific American Executive Editor Fred Guterl about the technological "Entanglement" and the attempts to build the other, hardier Internet. Web sites related to this episode include http://compass-summit.com and The Shadow Web

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=the-coming-entanglement-bill-joy-an-12-02-15&WT.mc_id=SA_WR_20120222

    —Huffduffed by adactio