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Tagged with “culture” (176)

  1. Lewis Dartnell at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    Lewis Dartnell at The Interval: From the cultivation of the first crops to the founding of modern states, the human story is the story of environmental forces, from plate tectonics and climate change, to atmospheric circulation and ocean currents.

    Professor Lewis Dartnell will dive into the planet’s deep past, where history becomes science, to explore a web of connections that underwrites our modern world, and that can help us face the challenges of the future.

    Lewis Dartnell is a Professor of Science Communication at the University of Westminster. Before that, he completed his biology degree at the University of Oxford and his PhD at UCL, and then worked as the UK Space Agency research fellow at the University of Leicester, studying astrobiology and searching for signs of life on Mars. He has won several awards for his science writing and contributes to the Guardian, The Times, and New Scientist. He is also the author of three books. He lives in London, UK.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02019/sep/10/origins-how-earths-history-shaped-human-history/

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  2. Palladium Podcast 59: Samo Burja on Long History – Palladium

    Samo Burja joins Wolf Tivy from Turkey to discuss why civilization is older than we thought. Samo’s research into ruins like Göbekli Tepe inspired him to ask just how ancient civilization could really be. Topics include why national politics can end up yielding archaeological progress, whether the Dunbar number is a false limit on human development, and why Samo is willing to bet on finding cities that predate the last Ice Age.

    https://palladiummag.com/2021/05/22/palladium-podcast-59-samo-burja-on-long-history/

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  3. How the Irish shaped Britain

    With migration, integration and assimilation dominating much public debate, Fergal Keane explores the profound influence, over many centuries, of the Irish in Britain. Whether it is 19th Century theatre or verse, or today’s pop culture, Irish migrants and their descendants have deeply influenced and steered the UK’s literature and arts. Fergal Keane examines the impact of the longest and biggest immigrant story in the history of the United Kingdom.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p097pzn5

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  4. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Food

    Melvyn Bragg explores the history of food in Modern Europe. The French philosopher of food Brillat-Savarin wrote in his Physiology of Taste, ‘The pleasures of the table belong to all times and all ages, to every country and to every day; they go hand in hand with all our other pleasures; outlast them, and remain to console us for their loss’ . The story of food is cultural as well as culinary, and what we eat and how we eat has always been linked to who we are or whom we might become, from the great humanist thinker Erasmus warning us to ‘Always use a fork!’ to the materialist philosopher Feuerbach telling us baldly, ‘You are what you eat’.But what have we eaten, and why? In Europe since the Renaissance how have our intellectual appetites fed our empty stomachs? With Rebecca Spang, Lecturer in Modern History at University College London; Ivan Day, food historian; Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, Professor of Modern History at Oxford University.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00547n1

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  5. The Man Who Tried to Feed the World

    Norman Borlaug won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970 for his work as a wheat breeder. The disease-resistant, dwarf wheats that he developed were the foundation of the Green Revolution, banishing global famine and turning India into a food-exporting nation. Many people have hailed Borlaug as a saint, a saviour of humanity. Others have blamed him for everything that is wrong with the modern global food system. The truth, naturally, lies somewhere in between, which is brought out in a new documentary about Borlaug and his work.

    The documentary airs on PBS in the United States next week. I got the chance to see a preview and to talk to Rob Rapley, the writer, director and producer.

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  6. Fall, or Dodge in Hell | Neal Stephenson

    Neal Stephenson, author of "Fall, or Dodge in Hell", in conversation with Long Now Board Member, Kevin Kelly.

    "Fall, or Dodge in Hell": https://www.harpercollins.com/9780062458711/fall-or-dodge-in-hell/ is pure, unadulterated fun: a grand drama of analog and digital, man and machine, angels and demons, gods and followers, the finite and the eternal. In this exhilarating epic, Neal Stephenson raises profound existential questions and touches on the revolutionary breakthroughs that are transforming our future. Combining the technological, philosophical, and spiritual in one grand myth, he delivers a mind-blowing speculative literary saga for the modern age.

    Neal Stephenson: https://www.nealstephenson.com is the bestselling author of the novels "Reamde", "Anathem", "The System of the World", "The Confusion", "Quicksilver", "Cryptonomicon", "The Diamond Age", "Snow Crash", and "Zodiac", and the groundbreaking nonfiction work "In the Beginning…Was the Command Line." He lives in Seattle, Washington.

    "Neal Stephenson - Fall, or Dodge in Hell " was given on June 06, 02019 as part of The Long Now Foundation’s “Conversations at The Interval” Salon Talks. These hour long talks are recorded live at The Interval, our bar, cafe, & museum in San Francisco. Since 02014 this series has presented…

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