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Tagged with “cosmos” (7)

  1. David Deutsch: A new way to explain explanation | TED Talk

    For tens of thousands of years our ancestors understood the world through myths, and the pace of change was glacial. The rise of scientific understanding transformed the world within a few centuries. Why? Physicist David Deutsch proposes a subtle answer.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/david_deutsch_a_new_way_to_explain_explanation

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  2. Neil DeGrasse Tyson Explains Why The Cosmos Shouldn’t Make You Feel Small : NPR

    The astrophysicist says that participating in a "great unfolding of a cosmic story," should make us feel large, not small. This spring, Tyson hosts a TV series called Cosmos: A Space-Time Odyssey.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/02/27/283443670/neil-degrasse-tyson-explains-why-the-cosmos-shouldnt-make-you-feel-small

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  3. David Deutsch: Chemical scum that dream of distant quasars

    Legendary scientist David Deutsch puts theoretical physics on the back burner to discuss a more urgent matter: the survival of our species. The first step toward solving global warming, he says, is to admit that we have a problem.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/david_deutsch_on_our_place_in_the_cosmos.html

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  4. David Deutsch And The Beginning of Infinity

    Quantum computing genius and Oxford don David Deutsch is a thinker of such scale and audaciousness he can take your breath away. His bottom line is simple and breathtaking all at once.

    It’s this: human beings are the most important entities in the universe. Or as Deutsch might have it, in the “multiverse.” For eons, little changed on this planet, he says. Progress was a joke. But once we got the Enlightenment and the scientific revolution, our powers of inquiry and discovery became infinite. Without limit.

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  5. Lord Martin Rees: Life and the Cosmos

    It’s famously called the Final Frontier, and thanks to rapidly developing technology we now know more about the outer reaches of our galaxy than ever. But that leaves unknowns.

    Does the universe have any limits? Are there any other earth-like planets out there? And the big one, are we alone?

    Addressing the University of Melbourne recently, Britain’s Astronomer Royal, Lord Martin Rees, reports on the latest research.

    http://fora.tv/2010/03/30/Lord_Martin_Rees_Life_and_the_Cosmos

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  6. Science & The City: What Time Is It?

    Famed screenwriter Charlie Kaufman and theoretical physicist Brian Greene dissect time as we know it. What is the smallest unit of time, and what does it look like? For starters, you should stop looking at the clock, and start looking at the universe.

    http://www.nyas.org/Publications/Media/PodcastDetail.aspx?cid=f3f02313-c697-49da-b298-9b00f2e3d541

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  7. To The Best Of Our Knowledge: Einstein, God & The Universe

    Albert Einstein died more than half a century ago, but there’s still a raging debate over what he thought about religion. He once said "Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind." In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, what exactly did Einstein conclude about religion? We’ll hear from leading scientists and religious scholars, including Richard Dawkins, Steven Weinberg and Elaine Pagels, as well as Einstein biographer Walter Isaacson.

    Steve Paulson speaks with Richard Dawkins, Elaine Pagels, and Einstein biographer Walter Isaacson. David Lindorff wrote about two physicists’ interest in mysticism and alchemy. David Leavitt tells the story of mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan. Father Thomas Keating talks about God and the contemplative life.

    http://wpr.org/book/080106a.html

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