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Tagged with “cooking” (109)

  1. Rocket Fuel: Cooking the Books with Mary Robinette Kowal – FRAN WILDE

    What Mary Robinette Kowal brings to the Cooking the Books table is no fewer than seven novels, two short story collections, more than 70 short stories, a blog that boosts other writers with My Favorite Bit, advocacy and volunteering, the Writing Excuses Podcast AND Cruise, the Futurescapes Writing Workshop, and a somewhat unfortunate attachment to okra, although she explains to me frequently that I’ve just not had it cooked properly. There’s a lot more as well (audio recordings, puppetry, a serious dedication to both fashion and typewriters…)

    Mary is an outstanding cook and has been visiting NASA often for research on her latest books — part of the Lady Astronaut of Mars series — The Calculating Stars and The Fated Sky, the first of which is out July 3. (the second appears August 21). So of course we asked her about space food.

    She joins Aliette de Bodard and me for Cooking the Books this month (in our 65th interview & 38th podcast episode!) to dish on all the details.

    https://franwilde.wordpress.com/2018/06/27/rocket-fuel-cooking-the-books-with-mary-robinette-kowal/

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  2. The Importance of Tangerines: Cooking the Books with Yoon Ha Lee – FRAN WILDE

    This is the podcast in which we try not to fangirl. (That’s all of the podcasts, actually.) We failed. (Ok I failed, Aliette asked excellent questions from her berth as an instructor on the Writing Excuses cruise and I just … well, you’ll see.)

    Yoon Ha Lee’s first collection, Conservation of Shadows, and his short stories at Tor.com, Lightspeed, Beneath Ceaseless Skies and more, have been favorites for a long time. When Ninefox Gambit came out last year, I was hooked, and Raven Strategem has come through even stronger.

    On the heels of his second Hexarchate novel, Yoon stopped by to discuss tangerines, researching the history of kimchi, and the complexities of characters including Jedao. It’s all for Cooking the Books this month, both here and at the extension kitchen over at The Booksmugglers! (check out Yoon’s Booksmugglers Bonus answers!).

    https://franwilde.wordpress.com/2017/08/09/the-importance-of-tangerines-cooking-the-books-with-yoon-ha-lee/

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  3. Rachel Laudan on the History of Food and Cuisine - Econlib

    Rachel Laudan, visiting scholar at the University of Texas and author of Cuisine and Empire, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the history of food. Topics covered include the importance of grain, the spread of various styles of cooking, why French cooking has elite status, and the reach of McDonald’s. The conversation concludes with a discussion of the appeal of local food and other recent food passions.

    http://www.econtalk.org/rachel-laudan-on-the-history-of-food-and-cuisine/

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  4. Is There a Place for Salt?

    Sheila Dillon asks if there is a place for salt in our cooking and if all salts are equal.

    Salt has long been prized, but in recent years it has become, for many, something to be avoided: to reduce or even eliminate. At the same time, there are new salt making businesses popping up all over the UK, celebrating salts with - they claim - unique characteristics due to their location and methods of production; they are salts of a place. In this edition of The Food Programme Sheila Dillon asks if there is a place for salt - in our kitchens and on our plates.

    Featuring chef and writer of ‘Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat’ Samin Nosrat, lexicographer and etymologist (and Dictionary Corner resident) Susie Dent, Senior Health Correspondent for online news site vox.com Julia Belluz, salt makers Alison and David Lea-Wilson, and the chef and author of ‘Salt is Essential’: Shaun Hill.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09zt49r

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  5. Butterbeer and Grootcakes

    Aleks Krotoski takes her seat at the table to explore the amazing world of fictional food made real.

    Food is not a new force in fiction, but increasingly fictional food is finding its way onto the table. And fan communities from the new breed of modern cultural canon aren’t just nibbling on Laura Esquivel’s devastating quail in rose petal sauce from Like Water for Chocolate, but also tucking in to fried squirrel and raccoon from The Hunger Games, Sansa’s lemon cakes from Game of Thrones, or downing a frothy glass of butterbeer from Harry Potter.

    Now Aleks gathers together three people who know a lot about fictional food to discuss its appeal for fans, authors and food creators alike. Together, they will make, and eat, a meal of food from fiction, and discuss some of the interesting questions it raises.

    Joanne Harris is author of several novels where food is almost a character in its own right - most famously Chocolat, which was turned into a film of the same name; she also co-created a cookbook, The Little Book of Chocolat, for the many fans desperate to make the concoctions they had read about in her novels. Sam Bompas is co-founder of creative food studio Bompas & Parr, who recently helped create Dinner At The Twits, inspired by Roald Dahl’s book. And Kate Young brings together her passion for food and literature in her blog The Little Library Café, where she creates recipes for food found in fiction, and many of them will be included in her first cookbook, The Little Library Cookbook.

    The programme also includes music played on the flavour conductor - a working cocktail organ, conceived by Sam Bompas for Johnnie Walker. The music is composed by Simon Little.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0560f1h

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  6. A computer learns about ingredients and recipes

    Recommendation engines are everywhere. They let Netflix suggest shows you might want to watch. They let Spotify build you a personalised playlist of music you will probably like. They turn your smartphone into a source of endless hilarity and mirth. And, of course, there’s IBM’s Watson, recommending all sorts of “interesting” new recipes. As part of his PhD project on machine learning, Jaan Altosaar decided to use a new mathematical technique to build his own recipe recommendation engine.

    The technique is similar to the kind of natural language processing that powers predictive text on a phone, and one of the attractions of using food instead of English is that there are only 2000–3000 ingredients to worry about, instead of more than 150,000 words.

    The results so far are fun and intriguing, and can only get better.

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/a-computer-learns-about-ingredients-and-recipes/

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  7. An Antarctic Chef

    Charles Green. Chas to his family, ‘cook’ to his colleagues. A young baker whose sense of adventure drew him to a career cooking on the sea. You may never have heard of Charles, but you certainly will have heard of an expedition on which he played a crucial role…

    Charles was cook for the crew of the 1914 Trans-Antarctic Expedition led by Sir Ernest Shackleton. A disastrous expedition which ended up lasting for more than two years. The men were forced to camp on moving ice flows, and eventually a remote Antarctic beach on Elephant Island. But against all odds, every man on Shackleton’s ship The Endurance survived. In August 1916, the men were rescued. They were on the edge of starvation.

    During their time on the ice, Charlie Green cooked tirelessly using his creative flair to concoct meals out of exceptionally meagre means. His food kept the men alive. He went back to the Antarctic with Shackleton on the expedition which would be Shackleton’s last. But then, despite living until the 1970s, he faded into obscurity. Known only for slide shows that he gave locally with the well-known images of the expedition.

    One hundred years on, another Antarctic chef Gerard Baker, uncovers the extraordinary life led by Charles Green and his version of two years cooking for the men of the Endurance. One of the greatest survival stories of all time.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07vk71m

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