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Tagged with “cooking” (101)

  1. An Antarctic Chef

    Charles Green. Chas to his family, ‘cook’ to his colleagues. A young baker whose sense of adventure drew him to a career cooking on the sea. You may never have heard of Charles, but you certainly will have heard of an expedition on which he played a crucial role…

    Charles was cook for the crew of the 1914 Trans-Antarctic Expedition led by Sir Ernest Shackleton. A disastrous expedition which ended up lasting for more than two years. The men were forced to camp on moving ice flows, and eventually a remote Antarctic beach on Elephant Island. But against all odds, every man on Shackleton’s ship The Endurance survived. In August 1916, the men were rescued. They were on the edge of starvation.

    During their time on the ice, Charlie Green cooked tirelessly using his creative flair to concoct meals out of exceptionally meagre means. His food kept the men alive. He went back to the Antarctic with Shackleton on the expedition which would be Shackleton’s last. But then, despite living until the 1970s, he faded into obscurity. Known only for slide shows that he gave locally with the well-known images of the expedition.

    One hundred years on, another Antarctic chef Gerard Baker, uncovers the extraordinary life led by Charles Green and his version of two years cooking for the men of the Endurance. One of the greatest survival stories of all time.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07vk71m

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  2. Cooking clubs in Basqueland

    Spain’s Basque region exerts a powerful influence on global cuisine, Dan Saladino finds out why. Heston Blumenthal and writer Harold Mcgee provide insights into this food culture.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0829dcq

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  3. 5 - Amanda Cohen and Adam Danforth - Meat and Veggie Showdown

    We’re bringing together a professional vegetarian and a professional carnivore.

    And not just any vegetarian—Amanda Cohen is the chef-owner of the celebrated restaurant Dirt Candy on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Without braising a single pork belly since it opened in 2008, Dirt Candy remains one of New York’s hottest restaurants. Our other guest, Adam Danforth, isn’t your everyday carnivore. A butcher by trade, Adam has written a James Beard Award-winning guide to meat cutting and worked at New York culinary temples Marlow & Daughters and Blue Hill. Despite his food’s popularity, he’s the butcher who thinks we should all be eating less meat. Plus: Smoothies! Reality TV! Pig tails!

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  4. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Claudia Roden

    This week Sue Lawley’s castaway is the award-winning cookery writer Claudia Roden whose Book of Middle Eastern Food revolutionised Western attitudes to the cuisines of the Middle East. Her Book of Jewish Food has been described as ‘the richest and most sensuous encyclopaedia of Jewish life ever set in print’. She chooses eight records to take with her to the mythical island.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00948k7

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  5. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Heston Blumenthal

    Kirsty Young’s castaway this week is the chef Heston Blumenthal. He is one of only three chefs working in Britain today to be awarded three Michelin stars and last year his restaurant, The Fat Duck, was named the best in the world by a panel of 5,000 food experts.

    His speedy rise to the top of his profession is little short of extraordinary. He has only ever spent a week in a professional kitchen and taught himself classical French cookery. He became fascinated by the science of cooking and has become the Willy Wonka of modern cuisine - dishes he’s created include mango and douglas fir puree, salmon poached with liquorice and, most famously, snail porridge. But he acknowledges his success has been largely due too to his wife’s support and now wants to change the balance of his life towards spending more time with his young family.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0093tyn

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  6. For Israeli-Born Chef, Hummus And ‘Tehina’ Are A Bridge To Home : The Salt : NPR

    Chef Michael Solomonov sees his mission as connecting people to the food of his homeland. "That, to me, is my life’s work," he says. Solomonov’s new cookbook is Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/10/06/446249184/for-israeli-born-chef-hummus-and-tehina-are-a-bridge-to-home

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  7. Is This Food Racist?

    How do our assumptions about people affect our assumptions about their food? And how do their assumptions about our food affect how we feel about ourselves? What happens when chefs cook a cuisine they weren’t born into? And what happens when there’s a backlash? Our friend Dan Pashman, host of WNYC Studio’s The Sporkful, has launched a special series of episodes called "Other People’s Food," which aims to explore exactly these questions. Dan talks with Brooke about the project so far. 

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  8. Fifth quarter: Rachel Roddy’s Rome

    That sink is where Rachel Roddy, an English woman in Rome, prepares meals to share with her partner Vincenzo, their young son Luca, and a horde of appreciative readers of her website and, now, her first book.

    Five Quarters: Recipes and Notes from a Kitchen in Rome, features the sink on its front cover. That probably makes it one of the most famous sinks in Rome. So naturally when Rachel and I got home from our meeting in the new Testaccio market, it was the first thing I wanted to see. And photograph. Our conversation ranged widely, from book titles and domain names to the links between the food of Rome and the food of Manchester. And although she says she’s a romantic and prone to nostalgia, it is also clearly the case that Rachel Roddy loves learning about food and cooking, loves sharing what she’s learned, and loves telling stories. Simple ingredients, for a satisfying cookbook and website.

    A couple of other links. Rachel mentioned her friend Fabrizia Lanza and the farm and cooking school she runs in Sicily. Here’s what Rachel wrote recently about a wonderful idea called Cook the Farm. If you decide to follow the link, do give yourself time to pursue Rachel down all her intriguing rabbit holes.

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/fifth-quarter-rachel-roddys-rome/

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  9. Food Transformers: Reimagining Food Traditions - SXSW Interactive/Film 2016

    Three nationally-acclaimed, dynamic chefs share their inspiration for how they have transformed time-honored food traditions into hot tastes for today’s palates. Food writer and culinary network star Virginia Willis transforms classic-but-heavy southern recipes into healthful and wholesome by re-imagining ingredients while keeping Southern charm and appeal. Austin chef / DJ, Tatsu Aikawa (co-owner of Ramen Tatsu-Ya) infuses time-honored ramen-making techniques into a mash-up of inventive ramen dishes. Chef Michael Fojtasek (co-owner of Olamaie, Eater National’s 21 Best New Restaurants) transforms five generations of Southern cooking traditions into Modern Southern Cuisine.

    https://soundcloud.com/officialsxsw/food-transformers-reimagining-food-traditions-sxsw-interactivefilm-2016

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  10. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Rene Redzepi

    Rene Redzepi, Danish chef, is interviewed by Kirsty Young for Desert Island Discs.

    His restaurant, Noma, in Copenhagen has been named ‘best in the world’ for a fourth time, and holds two Michelin stars. His cooking captures not just the essence of his homeland - using ingredients like reindeer tongue, sea buckthorn or fish scales - but also a strong flavour of ‘now’. He believes traditional notions of luxury are outdated. A sense of ‘time and place’ are his kitchen’s guiding principles.

    His childhood was split between Denmark and Macedonia, where he spent his summers foraging in the woods. He as good as stumbled into catering, because he couldn’t think of anything better to do, but pretty quickly realised that cooking allowed him to dream.

    He says, "The day when there is no more to do is the day when you’re burned out. There are endless possibilities - it’s just whether you can see them or not … and right now I see plenty."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b044bcc5

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