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Tagged with “conversation” (14)

  1. Mandolin virtuoso Avi Avital - Conversations - ABC Radio

    Avi is revolutionising the image of traditional folk instrument, the mandolin (R)

    Avi grew up in Be’er Sheva in Israel, where he learned mandolin from a violinist.

    Not until he went to Italy to study at the Cesare Pollini Conservatory of Music in Padua, did he play music written specifically for his instrument.

    Today his style sits somewhere between the traditional mandolin technique he was taught in Italy, and his own.

    Avi now lives in Berlin and performs all over the world, from New York’s Carnegie Hall, to the Forbidden City in Beijing.

    His renditions of Baroque and folk music, in concert and recordings, have been described as ‘electric’, and have seen his acclaim, and touring schedule, grow dramatically.

    In a first for a mandolinist, Avi was nominated for a Best Instrumental Soloist Grammy in 2010.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/conversations/avi-avital-rpt/9022104

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  2. The morality of robots: Genevieve Bell’s predictions for the future of AI - Conversations - ABC Radio

    Genevieve had never imagined a life in technology, until a chance meeting in a bar in Palo Alto.

    A chance meeting in a bar one night led a young Australian academic Genevieve Bell into a job she’d never expected.

    She was hired by software maker, Intel, as their resident anthropologist.

    Her boss asked her to find out how people outside America were using their cell phones.

    This began fourteen years of helping translate how humans use technology back to the software engineers who make the machines in the first place.

    Now Genevieve is back in Australia, in a job which aims to transform how we think about the interconnectedness of the technological world.

    In an era of rising anxiety about Artificial Intelligence, she says many predictions about the AI-driven future are far too apocalyptic.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/conversations/conversations-genevieve-bell/9173822

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  3. Facebook and the last days of reality: futurist Mark Pesce - Conversations - ABC Radio

    Is our increasing immersion in the online world affecting our ability to distinguish between what’s real and what’s not?

    Mark is an inventor, writer and entrepreneur, with more than three decades experience in digital technology.

    He believes Facebook is constantly trying to shape the emotional state of its users, to make them happy to stay there longer.

    Mark says the world is increasingly being presented to us as we want to see it, rather than as it really is.

    Looking ahead, he is wondering whether we’re approaching the last days of reality.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/conversations/conversations-mark-pesce/9354558

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  4. Tom Coates on conversational devices

    The O’Reilly Bots Podcast: Conversational interfaces for the Internet of Things.

    In this episode of the O’Reilly Bots Podcast, I speak with Tom Coates, co-founder of Thington, a service layer for the Internet of Things. Thington provides a conversational, messaging-like interface for controlling devices like lights and thermostats, but it’s also conversational at a deeper level: its very architecture treats the interactions between different devices like a conversation, allowing devices to make announcements to any other device that cares to listen.Coates explains how Thington operates in a way analogous to social media; in fact, he calls it “a Twitter for devices.” Just as people engage with each other in a commons, devices chat with each other in Thington’s messaging commons. He also discusses the value of human-readable output and the challenges involved in writing human-understandable scripts.

    Other links:

    Coates’ blog post “The Shape of Things,” an overview of how connected devices will communicate with humans

    Google Translate’s interlingua

    The O’Reilly Artificial Intelligence conference, June 27-29, 2017, in New York

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/tom-coates-on-conversational-devices

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  5. Hear Ryan Adams and Bob Mould Play Music And Talk About Everything Under The Sun : All Songs Considered : NPR

    Bob Mould has a new solo album, and Ryan Adams, who is a fan, invited the singer to his home studio for a rambling conversation that’s occasionally interrupted by the pair recording a song together.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2016/03/24/471733566/hear-ryan-adams-and-bob-mould-play-music-and-talk-about-everything-under-the-sun

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  6. Kitchen Conversations Podcast

    During Festival Luna, a two-day Global Weekends festival that took place at the American Museum of Natural History in early 2013, the Museum hosted a team from Kitchen Conversations, a project to document storytelling about food. Interviewers asked visitors to offer personal reflections about meals and cooking. In this podcast, join the conversation with raconteurs of all ages and from different backgrounds as they swap recipes and recall their favorite home-cooked meals. 

    http://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/kitchen-conversations-podcast

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  7. Brian Eno, Danny Hillis: The Long Now, now

    Make the next legal U-turn

    "Bitching Betty," they call the robotic voice of the car’s GPS guidance system.

    Eno and Hillis, on their road trips, always become so engrossed in conversation that they get lost—one time, driving to Monterey they wound up in Sacramento, 200 miles wrong.

    So they turn on GPS, and Betty joins the conversation with helpful advice about U-turns.

    Hillis observed, "The GPS is very good at giving you instructions to get someplace.

    But Brian and I have no idea where we’re going; we just want some time together.

    What usually happens for us after a couple days of frustratingly looking at the tiny GPS map is that we stop and buy a big paper map.

    And the moment we open a map of Nevada or Arizona, it feels like we’re in a much bigger world.

    The big maps are not that useful to navigate by, but there’s a sense of relief of seeing the bigger context and all the possibilities of where we might go.

    That’s exactly what The Long Now Foundation is for."

    Culture is a long conversation, Eno proposed.

    "When I talk about the practice of art I often use the word "conversation" because I think that you never see a piece of art on its own.

    You look at a painting in relation to the whole conversation of paintings.

    Some things are completely meaningless outside of that kind of context.

    if you think about Kazimir Malevich’s "White on White" painting, it’s hardly a picture actually, but it’s an important picture in the history of painting up to that point."

    Hillis replied, "My plan for painting is to have my bones removed and replaced with titanium, and then I grind up my bones to make white pigment."

    Eno: "That’s very old-fashioned."

    Hillis talked about the long-term stories we live by and how our expectations of the future shape the future, such as our hopes about space travel.

    Eno said that Mars is too difficult to live on, so what’s the point, and Hillis said, "That’s short-term thinking.

    There are three big game-changers going on: globalization, computers, and synthetic biology.

    (If I were a grad student now, I wouldn’t study computer science, I’d study synthetic biology.)

    I probably wouldn’t want to live on Mars in this body, but I could imagine adapting myself so I would want to live on Mars.

    To me it’s pretty inevitable that Earth is just our starting point."

    Eno remarked, "Sex, drugs, art, and religion—those are all activities in which you deliberately lose yourself.

    You stop being you and you let yourself become part of something else.

    You surrender control.

    I think surrendering is a great gift that human beings have.

    One of the experiences of art is relearning and rehearsing surrender properly.

    And one of the values perhaps of immersing yourself in very long periods of time is losing the sense of yourself as a single focus of the universe and seeing yourself as one small dot on this long line reaching out to the edges of time in each direction."

    Hillis described some elements of surrender designed in to the visitor experience of the 10,000-year Clock being built in the mountains of west Texas.

    "You’ll be away from your usual environment for days to travel to the remote site.

    Because of where it is on the mountain, you have to wake up before dawn, and there’s the physical exertion of climbing up the mountain.

    As you climb, there’s some points of confusion, where you’re not sure if you’re in the right place.

    "For example, in the total darkness inside the mountain, as you go up the spiral stairs surrounding the Clock mechanism for hundreds of feet, you think you know where you’re going because there’s light at the top of the shaft that you’re climbing toward, but as you get up there, the stairs keep becoming narrower, and you see they’re tapering off to smaller than you could possibly walk on.

    And you realize, ‘My plan isn’t going to work.’

    "You have to get away from the idea of direct progress and surrender that kind of control in order to find your way."

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02014/jan/21/long-now-now/

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  8. Jill Tarter , Robin Sloan “Long Conversation 5 of 19”

    This is one conversation out of the 19 that took place as part of the Long Conversation.

    Long Conversation, an epic relay of one-to-one conversations among some of the Bay Area’s most interesting minds, took place over 6 hours in San Francisco on Saturday October 16, 02010.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02010/oct/16/long-conversation-5-19/

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  9. Stewart Brand , Jane McGonigal “Long Conversation 19 of 19”

    This is one conversation out of the 19 that took place as part of the Long Conversation.

    Long Conversation, an epic relay of one-to-one conversations among some of the Bay Area’s most interesting minds, took place over 6 hours in San Francisco on Saturday October 16, 02010.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02010/oct/16/long-conversation-19-19/

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