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Tagged with “community” (19)

  1. ‘In disasters, most people are altruistic, brave, communitarian, generous…’ says Rebecca Solnit | CBC Radio

    Author Rebecca Solnit has an enduring fascination with what happens to communities in times of crisis, and what disasters reveal about human nature. With the global spread of the coronavirus pandemic, and its radical impact on our lives here in Canada, Solnit’s research on disasters becomes even more resonant.

    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/thesundayedition/the-sunday-edition-for-march-22-2020-1.5500395/in-disasters-most-people-are-altruistic-brave-communitarian-generous-says-rebecca-solnit-1.5500410

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  2. Bina Venkataraman: The power to think ahead in a reckless age | TED Talk

    In a forward-looking talk, author Bina Venkataraman answers a pivotal question of our time: How can we secure our future and do right by future generations? She parses the mistakes we make when imagining the future of our lives, businesses and communities, revealing how we can reclaim our innate foresight. What emerges is a surprising case for hope — and a path to becoming the "good ancestors" we long to be.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/bina_venkataraman_the_power_to_think_ahead_in_a_reckless_age?language=en

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  3. Mena Trott: Meet the founder of the blog revolution | TED Talk

    The founding mother of the blog revolution, Movable Type’s Mena Trott, talks about the early days of blogging, when she realized that giving regular people the power to share our lives online is the key to building a friendlier, more connected world.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/mena_trott_meet_the_founder_of_the_blog_revolution

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  4. The Accidental Technologist: Caterina Fake

    Caterina Fake was on her way to life in academia as a Renaissance literature scholar when the tech world came knocking. She co-founded Flickr, the hugely popular photo-sharing site, and started a handful of other tech companies. These days she runs her own VC investment firm and is regarded as one of Silicon Valley’s top visionaries. But spend five minutes with her and you’ll realize she has not left behind her academic roots; instead, she brings that mindset to everything from predicting the next big tech movement to making the case that every business should be a family business.Caterina Fake is the co-founder of Flickr and Hunch.com. She is a partner at Yes VC. To learn more about Caterina’s upcoming podcast check out ShouldThisExist.coWithout Fail is hosted by Alex Blumberg. It is produced by Sarah Platt and edited by Alex Blumberg, Devon Taylor and Nazanin Rafsanjani. Jarret Floyd mixed the episode. Music by Bobby Lord.

    https://www.gimletmedia.com/without-fail/the-accidental-technologist-caterina-fake#episode-player

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  5. Designing for Everyone, Everywhere with Luke Wrobkewski | Overtime

    Our latest Overtime guest, Luke Wroblewski, is known best for humanizing technology. He’s the author of several web design books, has founded several start-ups that were later acquired, and he’s now the Product Director at Google.

    In this episode, Dan and Luke discuss the key ideas behind his book Mobile First and how that translates to building for devices today, why we should be data-informed not data-driven when it comes to building products, and what he learned from his time creating and building Bagcheck and Polar.

    https://overtime.simplecast.fm/luke-wroblewski

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  6. #16 Model Behavior — with entrepreneur/investor Caterina Fake (Etsy, Kickstarter, Flickr)

    Whatever you are when you’re small gets amplified when you grow. So if you’re staring any kind of online community (social media, e-commerce, crowd-funding…) be careful what you cultivate. Caterina Fake has founded or invested in companies with the most interesting and influential communities - Flickr, Etsy, Kickstarter, Stack Overflow, even Blue Bottle Coffee. Her wise words for every founder: You have has a responsibility to shape the community from day one — because the tone you set is the tone you’re going to keep, even as you go viral.

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  7. How MetaFilter’s Founder (Successfully) Stepped Away From the Community After 16 Years

    After managing MetaFilter for 16 years, founder Matt Haughey stepped away from the community in 2015, handing the day-to-day operations over to a long time staff member with a small, paid team. More than a year and a half later, Matt stops by Community Signal to reflect on his decision and how it has impacted the community. The transition of power at MetaFilter is our focus on this episode, including what led Matt to realize that it was time for him to go. Plus:

    Why MetaFilter charges $5 for new accounts The time that Matt caught Dilbert creator Scott Adams posting anonymously to praise himself What concerns Matt about the consolidation of power in social media platforms

    Big Quotes

    “I worked at startups, and I didn’t like it. I couldn’t imagine ever running one or feeling comfortable with it. [With MetaFilter], I just wanted to build something that was useful for people and enjoyable, and gave back to the people who participated in it. That was my goal.” -@mathowie

    “[After taking a year to plan his exit from MetaFilter:] Maybe it’s the nature of community managers in general. We’re careful, thoughtful people or else we would have terrible communities. I’m the type of guy that gives three months notice if I leave a job. I don’t want to leave people feeling out of it. The community’s maintained health was my number one priority. It takes a year to pull yourself out of a project when you have tendrils in every aspect of it.” -@mathowie

    “[MetaFilter’s $5 account registration fee] wasn’t really economic. It was definitely just trying to put a hurdle in front of people. … Anytime we [were mentioned] in the press … 500 or 600 people would just funnel in, sign up for an account and find the nearest thread and just start leaving comments. Most of them are just clueless, like ‘What is this site for, why am I here, what the hell is this, I don’t even like the color of it?’ It would just be chaos.” -@mathowie

    “I never wanted a community that was so big, it felt anonymous.” -@mathowie

    “[When people started selling MetaFilter accounts on eBay,] I’m sitting there going like, ‘Boy, this is weird having a black market around my own thing.’ I was railing on the music industry. I was writing blog posts about how it sucks the music industry is vilifying Napster and MP3s like, let me pay for digital music. I remember begging, writing things in 2002 and 2003. … There’d be no Napster if you had 50 cent songs or dollar songs. It would be easier to just pay for them than it would be to track down these MP3s … I remember just thinking, yeah, there’s this black market around MetaFilter. I can get rid of it by just doing what I would ask the music industry to do, which is provide an economic way to do the right thing. There were no more eBay auctions after that because anyone could get [an account] for five bucks.” -@mathowie

    “Scott Adams and Dilbert stuff would come up on MetaFilter from time to time. I don’t even know what tipped me off … but I’d noticed every time there’s a thread about Dilbert or Scott Adams, there’s this weird user with this really bizarre username that’s always there to defend him to the death. He would argue with everybody about what a genius Scott Adams was. … We have PayPal records with some identifiers of your name and email. [I pulled up the account,] and it’s Scott Adams. … Running communities is weird. This stuff comes up from time to time.” – @mathowie

    “The way we think of comments today, as mostly garbage to be ignored and phasing out rapidly in many places, is largely due to the lack of community management.” -@mathowie

    “A zillion newspapers and news sites adopted comments without ever hiring a single person to moderate them or even care to look at them. So they became synonymous with cesspools of nonsense.” -@mathowie

    “I do think we’re just on the cusp of figuring out where the downside is to [consolidating social interaction to a few, powerful platforms]. Like this week, there was news that Facebook’s working on censorship software for China so that controversial articles would, basically, never be seen in China because that’s a requirement of web publishing in China. That’s really disturbing. How could that be applied by any other government or anybody else or anyone at Facebook? Those are things that are super concerning. I don’t know if we’re ever going to return to a rich, lush, open web of thousands of decentralized servers and writers, unfortunately.” -@mathowie

    About Matt Haughey Matt Haughey was one of the pioneers of blogging. In 1999, he started MetaFilter.com as the first blog community and continued to run it until last year. He’s now a writer at Slack, and continues to tinker on dozens of small web projects today. Related Links

    MetaFilter, the community that Matt founded and managed for 16 years Slack, where Matt is a senior writer Slashdot, a social news website and community that inspired Matt Digg, once a social news site, now a news aggregator Managing Online Forums, Patrick’s book Tom Vanderbilt, a New York Times bestselling author who has received inspiration from Ask MetaFilter for his books Alex Goldman, a MetaFilter user who now co-hosts the Reply All podcast for Gimlet Media The WELL, an early, influential online community Matt’s announcement at MetaFilter about moving on Jason Goldman, Chief Digital Officer of the White House, who helped Matt realize it was time to move on Josh Millard, who now manages MetaFilter Matt’s account on MetaFilter

    http://www.communitysignal.com/how-metafilter-transitioned-power-from-the-founder-after-16-years/

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  8. #0026: This Is Haughey Do It

    The evolution of MetaFilter: this week Paul Ford and Rich Ziade talk to Matt Haughey, the founder of MetaFilter, the collection of sites and communities that Paul describes as “one of the real success stories of the web.” The conversation covers Matt’s early career at Pyra Labs, the accessibility of digital technologies, his current job as a writer for Slack, and how if you spend enough time publishing online, you’ll inevitably attract the attention of two groups — trolls and lawyers.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/postlighttrackchanges/this-is-haughey-do-it
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 17 Aug 2016 01:21:19 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. 099 - Austin Kleon on Creative Community & More

    Today on the show we have the brilliant Austin Kleon!

    Austin is a bestselling writer and artist. You might know him from the books Newspaper Blackout, Steal Like an Artist or Share Your Work.

    Today on the show we talk about being part of a creative community, art school, location and more!

    Austin was so generous with his time and wisdom, you are going to love this!

    Apply to the CPT MFBA Online Program www.creativepeptalk.com/mfba

    Show Notes Austin Kleon http://austinkleon.com/

    Moomin Comics https://www.drawnandquarterly.com/moomin-book-one

    Nancy Strips http://nancyandsluggo.com/

    Bruce Eric Kaplan http://bruceerickaplan.com/

    Public School http://gotopublicschool.com/

    Bill Cunningham New York https://www.amazon.com/Bill-Cunningham-York-Anna-Wintour/dp/B0050I975Q

    John Maeda Talk (Paul Rand Quote) http://www.fastcodesign.com/3036833/innovation-by-design/ex-risd-president-john-maeda-to-designers-make-lots-of-money

    Hugh MacLeoud - Ignore Everybody https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0026NBZFI/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/creativepeptalk/099-austin-kleon-on-creative-community-more
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 06 Aug 2016 15:03:17 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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