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Tagged with “climate change” (12)

  1. Episode 63: Kim Stanley Robinson – The Conversation

    Kim Stanley Robinson is one of the biggest names in current science fiction. His most famous work is, arguably, the Mars Trilogy, but he is the author of seventeen novels and several collections of short stories. I could easily overburden you with biographical details and lists of his accolades, but I’ll leave that to this very comprehensive fan page.

    I learned about Stan through my interview with Tim Morton in 2012—they are friends and, at the time, both lived in Davis. It took a year but, when I next passed through Davis, I was fortunate enough to get three hours to sit down with Stan and talk about the future. I was especially interested in Stan’s work because he is an incredible researcher and regularly uses his fiction to explore a variety of plausible economic, scientific, ecological, and social futures. In other words, he uses fiction to ask many of the same questions that we have been asking our interviewees throughout the project. The result, I think, is one of the strongest and most wide-ranging interviews in The Conversation.

    http://www.findtheconversation.com/episode-63-kim-stanley-robinson/

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  2. Kim Stanley Robinson: Valuing the Earth and Future Generations: Imagining Post-Capitalism

    Climate change and population growth will combine in the twenty-first century to put an enormous load on humanity’s bio-infrastructural support system, the planet Earth. Kim Stanley Robinson argues that our current economic system undervalues both the environment and future human generations, and it will have to change if we hope to succeed in dealing with the enormous challenges facing us. Science is the most powerful conceptual system we have for dealing with the world, and we are certain to be using science to design and guide our response to the various crises now bearing down on us. A more scientific economics — what would that look like? And what else in our policy, habits, and values will have to change?

    Winner of Hugo, Nebula and Locus Awards, Kim Stanley Robinson is best known for his award-winning Mars trilogy. He has published fifteen novels and several short stories collections, often exploring ecological and sociological themes. Recently, the US National Science Foundation has sent Robinson to Antarctica as part of their Antarctic Artists and Writers Program. In April 2011, Robinson presented his observations on the cyclical nature of capitalism at the Rethinking Capitalism conference, University of California, Santa Cruz. In 1984, he published his doctoral dissertation, The N…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Csvroehk7Ww
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sun, 10 Mar 2019 00:11:13 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  3. Kim Stanley Robinson at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    "Adapting to Sea Level Rise: The Science of New York 2140": Legendary science ficiton author Kim Stanley Robinson returns to The Interval to discuss his just released novel New York 2140. Robinson will discuss how starting from the most up to date climate science available to him, he derived a portrait of New York City as "super-Venice" and the resilient civilization that inhabits it in his novel. In 02016 Robinson spoke at The Interval about the economic ideas that inform New York 2140. He will be joined by futurist Peter Schwartz in conversation after his talk.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02017/may/09/adapting-sea-level-rise-science-emnew-york-2140em

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  4. Professor Matt Ridley; Global Warming vs Global Greening

    Professor Matt Ridley explains some basics about just why we should not be in fear of "man-made" climate change. Speech was at the Royal Society, UK on the 17th October, 2016.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCcLggcPcj0
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 28 Oct 2016 20:20:35 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  5. Neil deGrasse Tyson & Bill Nye talk “The Future of Humanity” with Elon Musk

    Neil deGrasse Tyson explores the future of humanity with one of the men forging that future: billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla Motors. Co-hosted by Chuck Nice and guest starring Bill Nye.

    https://soundcloud.com/startalk/the-future-of-humanity-with-elon-musk

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  6. Smashing Physics: how we discovered the Higgs boson - podcast | Science | theguardian.com

    This week Guardian science editor Ian Sample meets particle physicist Professor Jonathan Butterworth from University College London to talk about his new book Smashing Physics. It’s an insider’s account of one of the most momentous scientific breakthroughs of our times: the discovery of the Higgs boson announced in July 2012.

    Jon discusses what it’s like to work on the largest science experiment in history and why such ambitious – and costly – endeavours benefit us all.

    Next up, British Association media fellow Nishad Karim reports from the UCL Symposium on the Origins of Life. Be it life on Earth or life elsewhere in the universe, this symposium covered it all with a range of experts from cosmology and biology to meteorology, discussing some very big questions. Where did we come from? Did life begin on Earth or elsewhere? Are we alone?

    Nishad spoke to several of the presenters including Dr Zita Matins, an astrobiologist from Imperial College London, and Dr Dominic Papineau, a geochemist from UCL. Dr Martins is a specialist in finding organic material essential for life in meteorites, and Dr Papineau looks for old organic life a little closer to home, analysing Earth rocks.

    Other speakers included Dr Francisco Diego, a UCL cosmologist, who discussed the life of the universe itself from beginning to now, 13.8bn years later.

    And finally, Ian asks Guardian environment writer Karl Mathiesen whether 2014 will be the hottest year on record.

    http://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2014/jul/28/smashing-physics-higgs-boson-jon-butterworth-podcast

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  7. David Deutsch: Chemical scum that dream of distant quasars

    Legendary scientist David Deutsch puts theoretical physics on the back burner to discuss a more urgent matter: the survival of our species. The first step toward solving global warming, he says, is to admit that we have a problem.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/david_deutsch_on_our_place_in_the_cosmos.html

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  8. Dyson on Heresy, Climate Change, and Science

    Freeman Dyson of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about science, his career, and the future. Dyson argues for the importance of what he calls heresy—challenging the scientific dogmas of the day. Dyson argues that our knowledge of climate science is incomplete and that too many scientists treat it as if it were totally understood. He reflects on his childhood and earlier work, particularly in the area of space travel. And he says that biology is the science today with the most exciting developments.

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  9. Science Weekly: End of the World News

    We talk to the BBC’s David Shukman about reporting climate change and the BP oil spill. Plus, the results of the Guardian’s hack day, a study on mobile phone masts and cancer, and the pitfalls of patenting genes.

    A gaggle of geeks recently invaded the Guardian’s London headquarters for a hack day. Their leader, Jeremy Keith, reveals the results of two days of brainstorming.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/audio/2010/jun/28/science-weekly-podcast-david-shukman

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