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Tagged with “china” (20)

  1. Radiolab: The Wubi Effect

    When we think of China today, we think of a technological superpower. From Huawei and 5G to TikTok and viral social media, China is stride for stride with the United States in the world of computing. However, China’s technological renaissance almost didn’t happen. And for one very basic reason: The Chinese language, with its 70,000 plus characters, couldn’t fit on a keyboard.

    Today, we tell the story of Professor Wang Yongmin, a hard headed computer programmer who solved this puzzle and laid the foundation for the China we know today.

    https://www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/radiolab/articles/wubi-effect

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  2. Episode 68: Little Rice - Xiaomi, Smartphones \u0026 The Chinese Dream With Clay Shirky by analyseasia

    Within the great firewall of China, Clay Shirky, associate professor from interactive media & arts department in NYU Shanghai and also TED speaker, joined us to discuss his latest book "Little Rice - Xiaomi, Smartphones & the Chinese Dream". In this episode, he shared his thoughts about the revolution of different media platforms and its after-effects to the evolution of Chinese companies from hardware manufacturing to software services and how the continued tension between economic development and political control will change the nature of Chinese companies going global. We also discussed how Xiaomi embodies "the Chinese Dream" and the challenges that it will face in expanding globally to the world.

    https://soundcloud.com/analyseasia/episode-68-little-rice-xiaomi-smartphones-the-chinese-dream-with-clay-shirky

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  3. Alex Garland “Ex Machina” | Talks at Google

    Writer, producer, director Alex Garland visits Google to discuss his directorial debut movie Ex Machina. Moderated by Dana Han-Klein.

    "Ex Machina" is about young coder at the world’s largest internet company, wins a competition to spend a week at a private retreat belonging to the reclusive CEO of the company. Upon his arrival, he learns that he must participate in a bizarre experiment which involves interacting with the world’s first true artificial intelligence, which comes in the form of a beautiful female robot.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvH-5rBEsgs
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  4. 82 Alex Garland - The Science of Ex Machina by Inquiring Minds Podcast

    Alex Garland is the writer and director of Ex Machina, a recently released film about what happens when someone is asked to interact with what might be the world’s first true artificial intelligence (as well as the writer of Dredd, Sunshine, and 28 Days Later).

    On the show this week guest host Rebecca Watson talks to Garland about the science behind the film, and what he learned in the process of making it.

    https://soundcloud.com/inquiringminds/82-alex-garland-the-science-of-ex-machina

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  5. Why Other Worlds? (Isn’t the “Real” One Enough?) | Key West Literary Seminar

    Margaret Atwood is a Canadian writer best-known for novels including the Man Booker Prize-winning Oryx and Crake and Year of the Flood, both of which are set in the near future. British novelist China Miéville often describes his work as “weird fiction”; his books, including Kraken and Un Lun Dun, have been credited with changing the rules of the fantasy and science fiction genres. Joyce Carol Oates is a prolific American novelist, poet, and essayist, as well as author of the recent memoir A Widow’s Story. Her works frequently explore the “other world” located in the human psyche and seek to recreate what she has called “the drama of human personality.”

    This panel discussion from the 2012 seminar was moderated by acclaimed science and technology writer James Gleick. He leads Atwood, Miéville, and Oates through a discussion of the tensions between the real and the unreal inherent in writing and reading works of fiction. “All fiction,” says Miéville, “revolves around an oscillation between recognition and estrangement.” “People read or go to art not to get answers,” explains Oates, “but for a thrilling experience that is essentially mysterious.” And while Atwood stresses fiction’s obligation to be “true to life,” she argues that even “ordinary domestic reality” (Gleick’s phrase) often appears surreal, wild, or supernatural when depicted truthfully.

    The novelists also discuss the readerly tendency to try to “decode” or “understand” strangeness in fiction and the exceptions to rules that create great works of art. “You can do anything you want” in fiction, says Atwood, “if you can pull it off.” Along the way, the novelists discuss a range of influences and examples, including German author Franz Kafka, Irish satirist Jonathan Swift, science fiction writer J.G. Ballard, philosopher George Santayana, and ghost story writer Algernon Blackwood.

    http://www.kwls.org/podcasts/why-other-worlds-isnt-the-real-one-enough/

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  6. China Miéville: Manifestos, Movements, & Moments | Key West Literary Seminar

    British novelist China Miéville is a three-time winner of the Arthur C. Clarke Award, given annually to the best science-fiction novel published in the U.K. His books include The City & The City, Iron Council, and, most recently, Embassytown, and he has drawn comparison to such writers as Franz Kafka, George Orwell, and Phillip K. Dick. Miéville is also active in left-wing politics, has stood for the House of Commons for the Socialist Alliance, and published Between Equal Rights, a book on Marxism and international law.

    On this recording from the final day of the 2012 seminar, Miéville sets out to explore genre, “the elephant in the room,” in a lecture which he says could be titled “in defense of pigeonholes.” The human mind is “a neurotically clucking connection maker,” says Miéville, “a taxonomic engine” that cannot help but divide art and literature into subdivisions. He argues that such separation into genre and sub-genre needn’t be seen as reductive, but rather ought to be embraced as a taxonomy that allows us to determine the ways in which one book stands in relation to another. Furthermore, says Miéville, quoting hip-hop artists Jay-Z and M.I.A., the distinction between genre fiction and so-called literary fiction can be reduced to a difference in “swagger,” or the way in which one presents oneself, one’s ideas, and one’s work. In a five-minute question-and-answer session at the end of the recording, Miéville talks about The City and the City and its indebtedness to crime and fantasy genres, his willingness to transgress the terms of genre, and the role of critics in creating genre distinctions.

    http://www.kwls.org/podcasts/china-mieville-manifestos-movements-moments/

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