adactio / tags / britain

Tagged with “britain” (10)

  1. How the Irish shaped Britain

    With migration, integration and assimilation dominating much public debate, Fergal Keane explores the profound influence, over many centuries, of the Irish in Britain. Whether it is 19th Century theatre or verse, or today’s pop culture, Irish migrants and their descendants have deeply influenced and steered the UK’s literature and arts. Fergal Keane examines the impact of the longest and biggest immigrant story in the history of the United Kingdom.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p097pzn5

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  2. The mystery of time - Big Ideas - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    More or less everything you know about time is wrong. This is no single time, but every one of you lives within your own time. Time passes at a different speed for each one of you. There is even no ‘now’ that you share with the person next to you. And the past only exists in your mind created by your memories.

    The Order of Time presented at the Royal Institution of Great Britain. 30 April 2018

    https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/the-mystery-of-time/9790674

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  3. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, Connected Thinking

    Long before the heroics of the world wide web, the internet was born out of a mixture of American ambition and British thrift. Packet Switching was the name coined by Welsh computer scientist Donald Davies in an effort to link the early computers in the labs of the National Physical Laboratory in Teddington.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069xdy3

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  4. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, ERNIE Picks Prizes

    In 1956, adverts enticed the British public with a brand new opportunity. Buy premium bonds for one pound, for the chance to win a thousand. At the time, it was a fortune - half the price of the average house.

    Behind this tantalising dream was a machine called ERNIE - the Electronic Random Number Indicator Equipment.

    ERNIE was built by the team who constructed Colossus, the code-breaking engine housed at Bletchley Park. They had just nine months to make a machine that generated random numbers using all the latest kit, from printed circuit boards to metal transistors.

    In this episode, mathematician Hannah Fry talks to Dr Tilly Blyth from the Science Museum about how ERNIE became an unlikely celebrity. Featuring archive from NS&I, the Science Museum and the BBC Library.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069wzvw

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  5. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, LEO the Electronic Office

    Hannah Fry hears the incredible story of how a chain of British teashops produced the first office computer in the world.

    J Lyons and Company was the UK’s largest catering company, with 250 teashops across the country. They also owned their own bakeries, a tea plantation and haulage firm, as Dr Tilly Blyth from the Science Museum describes.

    By the 1950s, this vast business was drowning in paperwork. Lyons embarked on an ambitious new project to build a machine called LEO - the Lyons Electronic Office.

    Their office computer was based on the giant calculating machines being built inside UK universities to solve mathematical equations

    Sure, these machines could manage maths, but could they handle catering?

    Featuring archive from the British Library, the Science Museum and the LEO Society.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069rvb4

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  6. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, Electronic Brains

    From the mobile phone to the office computer, mathematician Hannah Fry looks back at 70 years of computing history, to reveal the UK’s lead role in developing the technology we use today.

    In the first episode, she travels back to the 1940s, to hear the incredible story of the creation, in Britain, of the computer memory.

    Three teams from across the country - in Teddington, Manchester and Cambridge - were tasked with designing automatic calculating engines for university research. But which team would be first to crack the tricky problem of machine memory?

    Meanwhile, tabloid headlines proclaimed that engineers were building ‘electronic brains’ that could match, and maybe surpass, the human brain, starting a debate about automation and artificial intelligence that still resonates today.

    Featuring archive from the Science Museum and the BBC Library, plus an interview with technology historian Dr James Sumner from Manchester University.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069r3rt

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  7. How beer travelled the world

    Most every society has fermented alcoholic beverages - Mexican pulque, Peruvian chicha, Japanese sake, Indian palm toddy, African sorghum beer. But the German lager beer has largely displaced these local brewing traditions over the last 200 years to become a global consumer icon. That has many reasons—trade, migration, colonialism—but the success of lager lies also in the fact that it’s so bland.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/beer/6081164

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