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Tagged with “books” (57)

  1. Mini-Stories: Volume 9 - 99% Invisible

    Back in the 70s, being a film buff involved a lot of patience. A movie would open and then it would play in theaters for a year or so if it was popular. But then you had to wait a long time to see it again. There was no home video, and it could take years for a movie to make its way onto television. But there was one way you could experience your favorite film in the comfort of your living room: through novelizations.

    https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/mini-stories-volume-9/

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  2. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The danger of a single story | TED Talk

    Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_ngozi_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story

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  3. Why it’s time to stop worrying about the decline of the English language – podcast | News | The Guardian

    People often complain that English is deteriorating under the influence of new technology, adolescent fads and loose grammar. Why does this nonsensical belief persist?

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2019/sep/13/why-its-time-to-stop-worrying-about-the-decline-of-the-english-language-podcast

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  4. Abby Smith Rumsey at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    Abby Smith Rumsey at The Interval: Memory is not about the past, it is about the future. Historian and media expert Abby Smith Rumsey explores how digital memory, which cannot be preserved, will shape the future of knowledge and affect our survival. From March 02016.

    Abby Smith Rumsey is a historian who writes about how ideas and information technologies shape perceptions of history, of time, and of personal and cultural identity. She served as director of the Scholarly Communication Institute at the University of Virginia, and worked for more than a decade at the Library of Congress. Her book When We Are No More, How Digital Memory Is Shaping Our Future (02016) looks at how human memory from pre-history to the present has shed light on the grand challenge facing our world—the abundance of information and scarcity of human attention.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02016/mar/29/how-digital-memory-shaping-our-future

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  5. Marcus du Sautoy and James Bridle – books podcast

    On this week’s show, we’re exploring infinity and beyond with artist and writer James Bridle and mathematician Marcus du Sautoy.

    Through his visual art and writings on technology and culture, James Bridle has been at the forefront of our understanding of tech for the last decade – and from his perspective, the view of our future is both exciting and gloomy. He sat down with the Guardian’s technology reporter Alex Hern to talk about his book, New Dark Age.

    Limits are grist to the mill for Marcus du Sautoy, professor of public understanding of science at Oxford University. His mission is to explore – and if possible, explain – the unknown, so following hot on the heels of his bestselling book What We Cannot Know, is How to Count to Infinity. Meeting with Richard Lea at the Hay festival, Du Sautoy explained how a German mathematician first proved the existence of infinity in 1874, and what the concept means for our understanding of the universe.

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  6. Longform Podcast #289: Craig Mod · Longform

    Craig Mod is a writer and photographer. His podcast is On Margins.

    “You pick up an iPad, you pick up an iPhone—what are you picking up? You’re picking up a chemical-driven casino that just plays on your most base desires for vanity and ego and our obsession with watching train wrecks happen. That’s what we’re picking up and it’s counted in pageviews, because—not to be reductive and say that it’s a capitalist issue, but when you take hundreds of millions of dollars of venture capital, and you’re building models predicated on advertising, you are gonna create fucked-up algorithms and shitty loops that take away your attention. And guess what? You need to engage with longform texts. You need control of your attention. And so I think part of what subverted our ability to find this utopian reading space is the fact that so much of what’s on these devices is actively working to destroy all of the qualities needed to create that space.”

    https://longform.org/posts/longform-podcast-289-craig-mod

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  7. The Incomparable | I Tried to Quit This Book Twice (Episode 359)

    Looking for a good science fiction or fantasy book to read? Have we got a list for you. Our intrepid panel read all the novels nominated for the Hugo and Nebula awards this year—eight in total—and has returned with the results. No spoilers, but we’ll share our feelings about all eight books. With any luck, you’ll come out with one, or four, or eight books to add to your reading list.

    https://www.theincomparable.com/theincomparable/359/

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  8. 002: Frank Chimero, The New Golden Age of Bookmaking

    Designer and author Frank Chimero discusses the process behind his book, "The Shape of Design." We also dig into the normalization of paying creative people to make things via crowdfunding or patronage platforms, and why there’s never been a better time to make books. Show Links: 

    frankchimero.com Shape of Design online

    Shape of Design Kickstarter Kevin Kelly’s 1,000 true fans

    Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls, Kickstarter

    Robin Sloan Writes a Book, Kickstarter

    The Field Study Handbook Kickstarter Art Space Tokyo Kickstartup: Successful fundraising with Kickstarter and remaking Art Space Tokyo

    Full transcript and audio online at: https://craigmod.com/onmargins/002/  

    https://craigmod.com/onmargins/002/

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  9. Where to find what’s disappeared online, and a whole lot more: the Internet Archive | Public Radio International

    The Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine is much beloved by investigative reporters and others, looking to find out what a webpage looked like at some point in the past, even if it’s since disappeared. But the Internet Archive’s work is much more ambitious than that. Founder Brewster Kahle says through scanning books and recording video feeds around the world, it aims to make all human knowledge universally available on a decentralized Web, and illiberal impulses among leaders in America and elsewhere are only "putting a fire under our butts" to do the work, swiftly and effectively.

    https://www.pri.org/stories/2017-02-23/where-find-whats-disappeared-online-and-whole-lot-more-internet-archive

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