adactio / tags / books

Tagged with “books” (50)

  1. The Incomparable | I Tried to Quit This Book Twice (Episode 359)

    Looking for a good science fiction or fantasy book to read? Have we got a list for you. Our intrepid panel read all the novels nominated for the Hugo and Nebula awards this year—eight in total—and has returned with the results. No spoilers, but we’ll share our feelings about all eight books. With any luck, you’ll come out with one, or four, or eight books to add to your reading list.

    https://www.theincomparable.com/theincomparable/359/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. 002: Frank Chimero, The New Golden Age of Bookmaking

    Designer and author Frank Chimero discusses the process behind his book, "The Shape of Design." We also dig into the normalization of paying creative people to make things via crowdfunding or patronage platforms, and why there’s never been a better time to make books. Show Links: 

    frankchimero.com Shape of Design online

    Shape of Design Kickstarter Kevin Kelly’s 1,000 true fans

    Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls, Kickstarter

    Robin Sloan Writes a Book, Kickstarter

    The Field Study Handbook Kickstarter Art Space Tokyo Kickstartup: Successful fundraising with Kickstarter and remaking Art Space Tokyo

    Full transcript and audio online at: https://craigmod.com/onmargins/002/  

    https://craigmod.com/onmargins/002/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Where to find what’s disappeared online, and a whole lot more: the Internet Archive | Public Radio International

    The Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine is much beloved by investigative reporters and others, looking to find out what a webpage looked like at some point in the past, even if it’s since disappeared. But the Internet Archive’s work is much more ambitious than that. Founder Brewster Kahle says through scanning books and recording video feeds around the world, it aims to make all human knowledge universally available on a decentralized Web, and illiberal impulses among leaders in America and elsewhere are only "putting a fire under our butts" to do the work, swiftly and effectively.

    https://www.pri.org/stories/2017-02-23/where-find-whats-disappeared-online-and-whole-lot-more-internet-archive

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. BBC Radio 4 - Word of Mouth, Reading: Print v eBooks

    Michael Rosen & Dr Laura Wright discuss with linguist Professor Naomi Baron the quantifiable differences between the experience of reading print books and of reading eBooks, or onscreen. Which allows for deeper reading and a stronger emotional response, and what is the future of reading?

    Producer Beth O’Dea

    Naomi S. Baron is the author of Words Onscreen: The Fate of Reading in a Digital World.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06bnq18

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. The “Book Club” Episode | Internet History Podcast

    Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet, by Katie Hafner The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution, by Walter Isaacson The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires, by Tim Wu Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web, by Tim Berners-Lee How the Web Was Born: The Story of the World Wide Web, by James Gillies and Robert Cailliau AOL.com, by Kara Swisher The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon, by Brad Stone The Perfect Store: Inside eBay, by Adam Cohen Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader, by Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli Infinite Loop, How Apple, the World’s Most Insanely Great Company, Went Insane, by Michael S. Malone Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future, by Ashlee Vance

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2015/05/the-book-club-episode/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. BBC Radio 4 - Food Programme, Cookbooks of 2015

    Sheila Dillon and guests reflect on a year of cookery and food books.

    Sheila is joined in the studio by Bee Wilson, historian and food writer who’s about to publish First Bite: How We Learn to Eat, journalist and food writer Alex Renton, and Features Editor at trade magazine The Bookseller, Tom Tivnan.

    Tim Hayward meets chef Magnus Nilsson - who has just completed a nearly 800-page work called The Nordic Cook Book, the result of an almost Herculean effort to tell the food stories of a vast region.

    Sharing some of their standout books of the year are Xanthe Clay, Joanna Blythman, Gillian Carter and Diana Henry.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06qg1lv

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Kim Stanley Robinson and Sheldon Solomon on exploration and death – books podcast | Books | The Guardian

    Can humanity escape extinction by reaching for the stars? We confront final questions with the science fiction novelist Kim Stanley Robinson and the psychologist Sheldon Solomon.

    We’re heading off into the unknown in this week’s podcast, with a pair of writers who explore what drives our human experiment.

    The writer Kim Stanley Robinson has been examining possible futures for humanity for 40 years in a series of novels that stretch from nuclear devastation through climate chaos to Mars and beyond. His latest novel, Aurora, pushes 500 years onwards with a story of a vast starship on a 200-year journey to Tau Ceti.

    Robinson explains why he decided to write a generation starship novel and why he’s happier pushing at the boundaries of fiction rather than the boundaries of science.

    The psychologist Sheldon Solomon has, by contrast, been expanding the realm of science, putting an insight from ancient philosophy – that our lives are shaped by our awareness of our own mortality – on a sound experimental footing.

    Solomon explains how he and his colleagues Jeff Greenberg and Tom Pyszczynski have been measuring the ways in which the fear of death alters our behaviour and how the stories we tell ourselves against that fear have forged history.

    http://www.theguardian.com/books/audio/2015/aug/07/kim-stanley-robinson-sheldon-solomon-exploration-death-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Bookclub: Patrick O’Brian — Master and Commander

    With James Naughtie. In a special 200th edition of the programme we celebrate the centenary of author Patrick O’Brian and Allan Mallinson is our guide to the first in his hugely popular series of Napoleonic naval stories, Master and Commander. Known as the Aubrey/Maturin novels, the twenty books are regarded by many as the most engaging historical novels ever written. Master and Commander establishes the friendship between Captain Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin, who becomes his ship’s surgeon and an intelligence agent.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/bc

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Space talk: Ann Leckie and Caleb Scharf

    This week we’re leaving planet Earth behind, with the astrobiologist Caleb Scharf and the science-fiction phenomenon Ann Leckie.

    Recent advances in astrophysics have allowed scientists to find planets orbiting around remote stars, with more than a thousand distant exoplanets identified in the last 20 years. Scharf explores the competing pulls of two principles which have guided modern astronomers, and outlines his proposal for a middle way where human life is "special but not significant, unique but not exceptional".

    The novelist Ann Leckie is both significant and exceptional, carrying off an unprecedented sweep of science fiction’s most prestigious awards with her debut novel, Ancillary Justice. She talks about how she got into the head of a vast, distributed intelligence, why gender politics made their way into her novels and the different ways in which scientific discoveries fire the SF imagination.

    http://www.theguardian.com/books/audio/2014/oct/17/ann-leckie-caleb-scharf-science-fiction-astrobiology-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. The power of positive sci-fi

    For a couple of generations, it’s been a truism that good science fiction is grim science fiction. Technology is out of control, democracy is failing, the environment ruined. Think Hunger Games, Minority Report, The Matrix, and Blade Runner, all the way back to 1984. But science fiction writer and astrophysicist David Brin believes we’ve gotten too fond of these bummers. “It’s so easy to make money with a tale that says: ‘Civilization is garbage. Our institutions never will be helpful. Your neighbors are all useless sheep,’” he laments. “’Now enjoy a couple of characters running around shooting things and having adventures in the middle of a dystopia.’”

    Dystopias are bad? That’s heresy for science fiction. But a few people are starting to agree with him, like Neal Stephenson, the author of Cryptonomicon and Snow Crash. A few years ago, Stephenson was on a panel discussion with Arizona State University President Michael Crow, and Stephenson started complaining that there were no big scientific projects to inspire people these days. Crow shot back, “You’re the ones slacking off!” In Crow’s view, it was the writers who weren’t pulling their weight, supplying the motivating visions for science and technology.

    From that discussion, Crow and Stephenson have collaborated on The Center for Science and the Imagination at ASU. And Stephenson founded a group called Project Hieroglyph, which recruits science fiction authors to write more optimistically about the future. “I guess I had never given science fiction writers enough credit of being leaders of innovation,” Stephenson says. The writers who contribute to Project Hieroglyph don’t have to consult with scientists or engineers, but doing so “shows they’re on the right track.” Stephenson says. Only three rules: no hyperspace, no holocausts and no hackers. Coming from Stephenson, the bard of hackers, that’s quite a challenge.

    http://www.studio360.org/story/power-of-positive-sci-fi/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

Page 1 of 5Older