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Tagged with “book:author=steven johnson” (28)

  1. Wondery - Feel The Story » American Innovations

    By 1975, George Lucas knew exactly what he wanted Star Wars to look like, but what it would sound like was another story altogether. Lucas was tired of Sci-Fi’s typical synthetic and electronic cliches; he wanted a sonic world that felt organic and personal. So he hired a young sound designer named Ben Burtt, and sent him out into the world with a recorder and microphone.

    Burtt would need to blend and manipulate his recordings in order to achieve original sound designs, customized in every way to help bring the Skywalker saga to life. Like a detective, Burtt would have to hunt for the perfect buzz, bark, or hum to make Star Wars come alive. And in the process, he and Lucas would help to change the way audiences experience sound in films.

    https://wondery.com/shows/american-innovations/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Star Wars’ Cinema Technology | The Saga Continues | 2

    With the success of STAR WARS, George Lucas finally had the independence and power to make movies exactly the way he wanted to make them—which was critical, because the sequels he planned were going to be even bigger and more challenging than the original. The artists of Industrial Light and Magic had barely finished the first film, but now they’d have to top themselves—designing a snow planet, imperial walkers, tauntauns, asteroid fields, a Cloud City, and a 12-mile long Star Destroyer.

    From 1978 to 1983, ILM surged forward with the mandate to not only complete the original STAR WARS trilogy, but also expand the company itself. The ultimate mission: to push the edge of what visual effects could be, and ultimately lead cinema from its analogue origins, to its digital present.

    https://wondery.com/shows/american-innovations/

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  3. Star Wars’ Cinema Technology | 6842 Valjean Ave | 1

    When STAR WARS debuted in May 1977, it gave rise to a pop-cultural phenomenon unlike any the world had ever seen. The movie was so singular and iconic, and so technically ambitious — that it almost never came to be.

    To bring Star Wars to the screen, new technology had to be invented and existing technology had to be utilized in ways never before imagined. None of the special effects companies in Hollywood could handle the blend of creativity and innovation necessary to bring director George Lucas’s vision to life. So Lucas built his own studio, and forever changed the way movies are made.

    https://wondery.com/shows/american-innovations/

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  4. Steven Johnson on the Importance of Play and the Decisions We Make

    Steven Johnson, is the author of eleven books, including such bestsellers as Farsighted, Wonderland, Where Good Ideas Come From, and The Ghost Map. He is also the host of the PBS series How We Got To Now and the podcast American Innovations.

    http://www.aldacommunicationtraining.com/podcast/stephen-johnson-importance-play-decisions-make/

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  5. Steven Johnson: Wonderland: How Play Made the Modern World - The Long Now

    Inventing toward delight

    Humanity has been inventing toward delight for a long time.

    Johnson began with a slide of shell beads found in Morocco that indicate human interest in personal adornment going back 80,000 years.

    He showed 50,000-year-old bone flutes found in modern Slovenia that were tuned to musical intervals we would still recognize.

    Beads and flutes had nothing to do with survival.

    They were art, conforming to Brian Eno’s definition: “Art is everything you don’t have to do.”

    It looks frivolous, but Johnson proposed that the pursuit of delight is one of the prime movers of history—of globalization, innovation, and democratization.

    Consider spices, a seemingly trivial ornament to food.

    In the Babylon of 1700 BCE—3,700 years ago—there were cloves that came all the way from Indonesia,

    5,000 miles away.

    Importing eastern spices become so essential that eventually the trade routes defined the map of Islam.

    Another story from Islamic history: when Baghdad was at its height as one of the world’s most cultured cities around 800 CE, its “House of Wisdom” produced a remarkable text titled “The Book of Ingenious Devices.”

    In it were beautiful schematic drawings of machines years ahead of anything in Europe—clocks, hydraulic instruments, even a water-powered organ with swappable pin-cylinders that was effectively programmable.

    Everything in the book was neither tool nor weapon: they were all toys.

    Consider what happened when cotton arrived in London from India in the late 1600s.

    Besides being more comfortable than itchy British wool, cotton fabric (called calico) could easily be dyed and patterned, and the democratization of fashion took off, along with a massive global trade in cotton and cotton goods.

    Soon there was an annual new look to keep up with.

    And steam-powered looms drove the Industrial Revolution, including the original invention of programmable machinery for Jacquard looms.

    Consider the role of public spaces designed for leisure—taverns, coffee shops, parks.

    Political movements from the American Revolution (Boston’s Green Dragon Tavern) to Gay Rights (Black Cat Tavern in Los Angeles) were fomented in bars.

    Whole genres of business and finance came out of the coffee shops of London.

    And once “Nature” was invented by Romantics in the late 1800s, nature-like parks in cities brought delight to urban life, and wilderness became something to protect.

    Play invites us to invent freely.

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02017/jan/04/wonderland-how-play-made-modern-world/

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  6. Greater Than Zero (Or, the Politics of Serious Games)

    An investigation into the surprising history of games designed to change our political values, from the radical origins of Monopoly to a brand-new spin on Pokémon GO created to mobilize swing state voters in the 2016 presidential campaign. Special guests: Jane McGonigal, Mary Pilon, and Asi Burak.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/wonderland-podcast/greater-than-zero-or-the-politics-of-purposeful-games
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sun, 23 Oct 2016 10:02:14 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Airplanes, Zoos, and Infinite Chickens (Or, Why Do Humans Like To Play?)

    An exploration of the power of play, from screen-based games like Pokemon Go or Minecraft, to the imaginative worlds of children inventing playgrounds out of everyday life, with special guests with special guests Alison Gopnik, professor at Berkeley and author of The Gardener and the Carpenter, Youngna Park, head of product at Tinybop, Clive Thompson, journalist and author of Smarter Than You Think, and Ian Bogost, philosopher and video game designer.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/wonderland-podcast/airplanes-zoos-and-infinite-chickens-or-why-do-humans-like-to-play
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 08 Oct 2016 18:18:58 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  8. How Cafe Culture Helped Make Good Ideas Happen : NPR

    It is easy to talk about great ideas as if they were light-bulb moments —€” sudden epiphanies where everything comes together for you. But Steven Johnson, author of Where Good Ideas Come From, says the great ideas of the past have taken a lot more hanging out than you’d expect.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130595037&ps=rs

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  9. Searching For The Origins of Creativity : NPR

    From Darwin’s theory of evolution to the invention of YouTube, what factors play a role in innovation? Is there such a thing as an idea whose time has come? Steven Johnson, author of Where Good Ideas Come From, talks about great conceptual advances and how to foster creativity.

    http://www.npr.org/2010/12/24/132311762/Searching-For-The-Origins-of-Creativity?ps=rs

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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