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Tagged with “book:author=margaret atwood” (15)

  1. Margaret Atwood - The Handmaid’s Tale

    Margaret Atwood discusses her dystopian masterpiece The Handmaid’s Tale with James Naughtie and a group of readers. This edition celebrates Bookclub’s 20th anniversary and includes contributions from former alumni of Bookclub such as Ali Smith, Eimear McBride and Evie Wyld; as well as the reading group made up of Radio 4 listeners.

    Thirty three years ago, Margaret Atwood published The Handmaid’s Tale, a novel about a futuristic America, which following a major ecological disaster, is ruled by a brutal, misogynistic Christian theocracy called Gilead. In 2017 The Handmaid’s Tale became a television series, going on to win eight Emmies. It followed the book closely, telling the tale of a society in which women are subjugated and not allowed to work or read, and valued only for their fecundity. The book has now found a new readership amongst a younger generation.

    The Handmaids - most prominently a woman called Offred, the narrator of the novel, are the few fertile women, who are assigned to the homes of married male rulers, and compelled to endure rape at their hands in the name of procreation.

    Margaret Atwood, who is one of the most celebrated novelists writing in English today, meets an invited audience of Radio 4 listeners, including sixth-formers and university students, to discuss the Handmaid’s Tale.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b4zf0w

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  2. 70. Margaret Atwood (Author) - The Good, The Bad, and The Stupid

    Today’s guest is novelist, essayist, poet, and as of late, comic-book writer Margaret Atwood. She’s also got some really funny mini-comics about bad interviews, so Jason tries extra-hard to bring his a-game here. She’s the Booker prize winning author of The Blind Assassin, Oryx & Crake, The Handmaid’s Tale, and around 40 other beloved books. Her latest, Hag-Seed, is a total and delightfully wicked reimagining of Shakespeare’s The Tempest.In this episode Margaret talks with Jason about genomes in the cloud, Bob Dylan’s Nobel prize, the elusiveness of dead authors, and why technology’s a three-edged sword.

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  3. Ursula Le Guin & Margaret Atwood - Literary Arts

    Ursula Le Guin begins her lecture with Margaret Atwood by saying, “I emailed Margaret about six weeks or so ago and said, ‘What are we going to talk about?’ and she replied, ‘I expect we will talk about 1) What is fiction?; 2) What is science fiction?; 3) The ones who walk away from Omelas—where do they go?; 4) Is the human race doomed?; 5) Anything else that strikes our fancy.’” The two women proceed to examine these questions and talk through their answers. They delve into their writing processes and motives, creating many humorous analogies for the act of writing, whether they connect it to naked chickens, salted slugs, or dark boudoirs.

    Margaret Atwood is a poet, novelist, short story writer, essayist, and environmental activist. She has written over 40 books and is best known for her fiction, including The Blind Assassin, which won the Man-Booker Prize in 2000. Atwood has used her public profile to advocate for human rights, the environment, and the welfare of writers. She has been president of PEN International and helped found the Writer’s Trust of Canada. As a public intellectual, Atwood is known as a brilliant thinker on a huge range of subjects who has a wry and ironic sense of humor and who is willing to call out platitudes and other forms of lazy thinking.

    Ursula K. Le Guin sold her first story over 50 years ago and has been writing and publishing ever since. Tackling various modes, including realistic fiction, science fiction, high fantasy, children’s literature, screenplays, and essays, her work has challenged traditional understandings of gender roles, politics, race, and identity. She is best known for her fantasy series Earthsea and her science fiction novel The Left Hand of Darkness. She has influenced several generations of writers, including Junot Díaz, Kelly Link, David Mitchell, and Jonathan Lethem. Throughout her career, she has continuously met criticism with courage, causing one critic to note, “It’s been hard for reviewers to cope with Le Guin. She’s often seemed like a writer without a critical context. But that may just mean that the context is still to come.” Among her many honors, Le Guin has received a National Book Award and, most recently, The National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

    If we knew everything ahead of time, we wouldn’t write the book. It would be paint by numbers and there wouldn’t be any discoveries.” – Margaret Atwood

    “Rereading a book is much better than reading it. A good book reread is better than a good book read.” – Ursula Le Guin

    “All doors are doors to the future, if you go into them.” – Margaret Atwood

    https://literary-arts.org/archive/ursula-le-guin-margaret-atwood/

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  4. Midnight in Karachi Episode 57: Margaret Atwood | Tor.com

    Welcome back to Midnight in Karachi, a weekly podcast about writers, publishers, editors, illustrators, their books and the worlds they create, hosted by Mahvesh Murad.

    The podcast returns this week with an interview with Margaret Atwood, in which she talks with Mahvesh about monsters, myths, wise old women, wicked witches, why everyone isn’t collectively freaking out about climate change and the potentials of eating cloned celebrity flesh.

    http://www.tor.com/2016/08/04/midnight-in-karachi-episode-57-margaret-atwood/

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  5. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Margaret Atwood

    Sue Lawley’s castaway this week is the writer Margaret Atwood. Born just after the outbreak of the Second World War, Margaret Atwood spent much of her childhood in the Canadian outback where her father’s work involved studying insects. She grew up mostly without television, cinema, mains electricity or even a proper road to civilisation. For company she had only her parents and her brother, with whom she wrote "serials, mainly about space travel".

    It wasn’t until her teens that the urge to write struck seriously, an event she describes as "a large, invisible thumb descended from the sky and pressed down on the top of my head. A poem formed." After University, a spell in England and a period teaching early morning classes to engineering students she had her first novel, The Edible Woman, published. Since then she has written nine more novels, four of which were Booker nominated with The Blind Assassin finally winning in 2000. Three of those novels have been made into films: Surfacing, The Handmaid’s Tale and The Blind Assassin. She has also published some dozen books of poetry, five collections of short stories, four books for children and assorted non-fiction titles. Her latest novel, Oryx and Crake, set in a genetically engineered, post-apocalyptic landscape is published on May 5th this year.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00937l3

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  6. Margaret Atwood and Michael Cunningham | Key West Literary Seminar

    On January 14th, 2007 Margaret Atwood and Michael Cunningham sat down on the Key West Literary Seminar stage for a conversation on the topic of “Speculative Fiction and the Art of Subversion”

    http://www.kwls.org/podcasts/margaret_atwood_and_michael_cu/

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  7. Why Other Worlds? (Isn’t the “Real” One Enough?) | Key West Literary Seminar

    Margaret Atwood is a Canadian writer best-known for novels including the Man Booker Prize-winning Oryx and Crake and Year of the Flood, both of which are set in the near future. British novelist China Miéville often describes his work as “weird fiction”; his books, including Kraken and Un Lun Dun, have been credited with changing the rules of the fantasy and science fiction genres. Joyce Carol Oates is a prolific American novelist, poet, and essayist, as well as author of the recent memoir A Widow’s Story. Her works frequently explore the “other world” located in the human psyche and seek to recreate what she has called “the drama of human personality.”

    This panel discussion from the 2012 seminar was moderated by acclaimed science and technology writer James Gleick. He leads Atwood, Miéville, and Oates through a discussion of the tensions between the real and the unreal inherent in writing and reading works of fiction. “All fiction,” says Miéville, “revolves around an oscillation between recognition and estrangement.” “People read or go to art not to get answers,” explains Oates, “but for a thrilling experience that is essentially mysterious.” And while Atwood stresses fiction’s obligation to be “true to life,” she argues that even “ordinary domestic reality” (Gleick’s phrase) often appears surreal, wild, or supernatural when depicted truthfully.

    The novelists also discuss the readerly tendency to try to “decode” or “understand” strangeness in fiction and the exceptions to rules that create great works of art. “You can do anything you want” in fiction, says Atwood, “if you can pull it off.” Along the way, the novelists discuss a range of influences and examples, including German author Franz Kafka, Irish satirist Jonathan Swift, science fiction writer J.G. Ballard, philosopher George Santayana, and ghost story writer Algernon Blackwood.

    http://www.kwls.org/podcasts/why-other-worlds-isnt-the-real-one-enough/

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