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Tagged with “book:author=malcolm gladwell” (14)

  1. Revisionist History Podcast: Dragon Psychology 101

    Dragons hoard treasure, deep in their lairs. They don’t show it off to their neighbors. Revisionist History applies dragon psychology to the strange world of art museums, with help from Andy Warhol, J.R.R. Tolkien, a handful of accountants and the world’s leading hoarding expert.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/42-dragon-psychology-101

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Revisionist History: The Queen of Cuba

    Listen to "The Queen of Cuba" Season 4 Episode 11 of The Revisionist History Podcast with Malcolm Gladwell.

    On February 24, 1996, Cuban fighter jets shot down two small planes operated by Brothers to the Rescue, an organization in Florida that tried to spot refugees fleeing Cuba in boats. A strange chain of events preceded the shoot-down, and people in the intelligence business turned to a rising star in the Defense Intelligence Agency, Ana Montes. Montes was known around Washington as the “Queen of Cuba” for her insights into the Castro regime. But what Montes’ colleagues eventually found out about her shook their sense of trust to the core. (In this excerpt from Malcolm Gladwell’s forthcoming audiobook Talking to Strangers, we hear why spy mysteries do not unfold in real life like they do in the movies.)

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/41-the-queen-of-cuba

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Revisionist History Podcast Episode 8: In a Metal Mood

    Two seasons after its investigation of the decline of McDonalds french fries, Revisionist History returns to fast-food’s high-tech test kitchens. This time the subject is cultural appropriation. The case study is Taco Bell. Oh, and Pat Boone is involved.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/38-in-a-metal-mood

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Revisionist History Podcast Episode 10: The Obscure Virus Club

    Throughout the 1970s, a biologist named Howard Temin became convinced that something wasn’t right in science’s understanding of viruses. His colleagues dismissed him as a heretic. He turned out to be right — and you’re alive today as a result. Season Four ends with a bedtime story about how we should be freed by our doubts, not imprisoned by them.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/40-the-obscure-virus-club

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Revisionist History Podcast Episode 4 Good Old Boys

    If you disagree with someone — if you find what they think appalling — is there any value in talking to them? In the early 1970s, the talk show host Dick Cavett, the governor of Georgia Lester Maddox, and the singer Randy Newman tried to answer this question.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/34-good-old-boys

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Malcolm Gladwell

    Malcolm Gladwell is best know for his work as an author including five New York Times Best Sellers: The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference (2000), Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005), Outliers: The Story of Success (2008), What the Dog Saw: And Other Adventures (2009), and David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants (2013). He has been a staff writer for the New Yorker since 1996 and is also the host of one of the most popular podcasts: Revisionist History. Malcolm sat down with Lance in New York for an engaging discussion on a variety of topics including: the order of triathlon events, sports nutrition, the use of power meters in cycling, Edward Snowden, and much more.

    http://theforwardpodcast.libsyn.com/malcolm-gladwell

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Episode 02 :: Revisionist History Podcast

    Listen to “Saigon, 1965” Episode 2 of The Revisionist History Podcast with Malcolm Gladwell.

    In the early 1960s, the Pentagon set up a top-secret research project in an old villa in downtown Saigon. The task? To interview captured North Vietnamese soldiers and guerrillas in order to measure their morale: Was the relentless U.S. bombing pushing them to the brink of capitulation?

    Saigon, 1965 is the story of three people who got caught up in that effort: a young Vietnamese woman, a refugee from Nazi Germany, and a brilliant Russian émigré. All saw the same things. All reached different conclusions. The Pentagon effort, run by the RAND Corporation, was one of the most ambitious studies of enemy combatants ever conducted—and no one could agree on what it meant.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/02-saigon-1965/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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