adactio / tags / book:author=james burke

Tagged with “book:author=james burke” (9)

  1. YANSS 089 – James Burke’s new project aims to help us deal with change, think connectively, and benefit from surprise – You Are Not So Smart

    In this episode of the YANSS Podcast, we sit down with legendary science historian James Burke, who returns to the show to explain his newest project, a Connections app that will allow anyone to search and think "connectively" when exploring Wikipedia. He launched the Kickstarter for the app this month. This is a link to learn more.…

    https://youarenotsosmart.com/2016/11/17/yanss-089-james-burkes-new-project-aims-to-help-us-deal-with-change-think-connectively-and-benefit-from-surprise/

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  2. BBC Radio 4 - The Infinite Monkey Cage, Series 9, Science and Spin

    A witty, irreverent and unashamedly rational look at the world of science communication.

    Listen in pop-out player

    This week on the Infinite Monkey Cage, Brian Cox and Robin Ince take to the stage at Manchester University, to discuss the state of science communication. Is the public engaged enough with the complexities of science? Are scientists engaging enough with the hoi polloi or still stuck in their ivory towers? And when was the ‘golden age’ of TV science, if it ever existed? Joining our presenters are scientists Matthew Cobb and Sheena Cruikshank, comedian Helen Keen and legendary science TV presenter and writer, James Burke, whose classic series ‘Connections’ captivated audiences around the world.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03m43fx

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  3. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, James Burke

    The castaway this week is James Burke, whose broadcasting style has been described as "turning science into show-biz". But, paradoxically, he admits to being immensely impractical and reveals to Michael Parkinson, while choosing his eight records to take to the island, that he at one time planned to make music his career.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p009mgby

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  4. James Burke on the coming age of scarce scarcity and abundant abundance

    James Burke is a legendary science historian who created the landmark BBC series Connections which provided an alternative view of history and change by replacing the traditional “Great Man” timeline with an interconnected web in which all people influence one another to blindly direct the flow of progress. Burke is currently writing a new book about the coming age of abundance, and he continues to work on his Knowledge Web project. In the interview, James Burke says we must soon learn how to deal with a world in which scarcity is scarce, we are more connected to our online communities than our local governments, and home manufacturing can produce just about anything you desire.

    We also sit down with Matt Novak, creator and curator of Paleofuture, a blog that explores retro futurism, sifting through the many ways people in the past predicted how the future would turn out, sometimes correctly, mostly not.

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  5. You Are Not So Smart 020 – James Burke and Matt Novak ponder the future and why we are terrible at predicting it

    If you love educational entertainment – programs about science, nature, history, technology and everything in between – it is a safe bet that the creators of those shows were heavily influenced by the founding fathers of science communication: Carl Sagan, David Attenborough, and James Burke.

    In this episode of the You Are Not So Smart Podcast we sit down with James Burke and discuss the past, the present, and where he sees us heading in the future. Burke says we must soon learn how to deal with a world in which scarcity is scarce, abundance is abundant, and home manufacturing can produce just about anything you desire.

    James Burke is a legendary science historian who created the landmark BBC series Connections which provided an alternative view of history and change by replacing the traditional “Great Man” timeline with an interconnected web in which all people influence one another to blindly direct the flow of progress. Burke is currently writing a new book about the coming age of abundance, and he continues to work on his Knowledge Web project.

    We also sit down with Matt Novak, creator and curator of Paleofuture, a blog that explores retro futurism, sifting through the many ways people in the past predicted how the future would turn out, sometimes correctly, mostly not.

    Together, Burke and Novak help us understand why we are to terrible at predicting the future and what we can learn about how history truly unfolds so we can better imagine who we will be in the decades to come.

    After the interview, I discuss a news story about how cigarettes affect the way your brain interprets cigarette advertising.

    In every episode, before I read a bit of self delusion news, I taste a cookie baked from a recipe sent in by a listener/reader. That listener/reader wins a signed copy of my new book, “You Are Now Less Dumb,” and I post the recipe on the YANSS Pinterest page. This episode’s winner is Patrick Regan who submitted a recipe for orange slice cookies. Send your own recipes to david {at} youarenotsosmart.com.

    http://youarenotsosmart.com/2014/03/18/yanss-podcast-020-james-burke-and-matt-novak-ponder-the-future-and-why-we-are-terrible-at-predicting-it/

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  6. Audioboo / James Burke predicted the future in 1973. Now he does it again.

    Forty years ago for Radio Times, the scientist and broadcaster James Burke predicted events in 1993. He got a lot right. So we asked him in to PM this afternoon to predict the future. The sound begins with an actor reading from the original article, written by Tony Peagam.

    https://audioboo.fm/boos/1574606-james-burke-predicted-the-future-in-1973-now-he-does-it-again

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  7. James Burke – 1 + 1 = 3

    Journalist and academic Aleks Krotoski presents the second of her three guest curated events on the theme of ‘Connections’.

    James Burke takes a sideways look at the connective nature of innovation and its social effects. Two ideas come together to produce something that is greater than the sum of the parts. The result is almost a surprise (in the way, for instance, the first typewriters boosted the divorce rate!).

    Innovation has usually attempted to solve some aspect of the problem with which we have lived for two million tool-using years: scarcity. As a result, our institutions, value systems, modes of thought and behaviour have all been shaped by the fact that there’s never been enough of everything to go around.

    However, thanks to the internet and a radically-accelerated rate of connective, inter-disciplinary innovation, we may be on the verge of solving the problem of scarcity once and for all. In ways that may really surprise us. What will abundance do to us? And how should we prepare for it?

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  8. Stranova.com interview about K-Web

    Watch the news, and every day you see proof that the world is increasingly interlinked. Nowhere is too far away to matter, now.

    More than ever, we need to understand how other people and events across the world affect the way we live.

    Take a journey on the Knowledge Web and you see how this has always been true. The modern world was shaped because of the way people and things in the past were connected.

    Thanks to information technology and easier access, today’s global interactivity is also beginning to involve many more people. For the first time, everybody makes an impact.

    The Knowledge Web provides an opportunity for users of all kinds and ages and interests to learn about how interactivity works. It offers the chance to experience history the way the players at the time did: full of surprise twists and turns, accidents, discoveries, friends and foes. Above all, the K-Web reveals how they never knew what was coming next. Just like you.

    The Knowledge Web also shows how all knowledge is interlinked, and how applying K-Web techniques to your own situation can help you to second-guess your own future—as an individual, or a community, or a company.

    http://www.k-web.org/public_html/jbmessage.htm

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  9. Science Historian and Television Personality James Burke

    James Burke is a science historian, author, and television producer best known for his BBC documentary series Connections, Connections2, and Connections3, which focus on the history of science and technology leavened with a sense of humor. Burke was BBC television’s science anchor and chief reporter on the Project Apollo missions, including being the main host on the coverage of the first moon landings in 1969. He has been a regular contributor for Scientific American and Time magazines, and served as a consultant to the SETI project. He is the leading figure of the KnowledgeWeb Project, a digital incarnation of his books and television programs that allows users to move through history and create their own connective paths. Owen Johnson hosts.

    http://indianapublicmedia.org/profiles/science-historian-television-personality-james-burke/

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